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What to do now?


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#1 newtechnology   Members   -  Reputation: 783

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 01:16 AM

So I'm working on my fps game from last 5 months. I implemented everything on graphics including animation and static model rendering. I wish to complete my game and I want it to be a multiplayer game like Call of Duty/CS. I've implemented little physics stuff from bullet physics. Now I wish to study sound and networking and i think this is going to take huge time. What should I now? I want to finish my game and work on another project. How to make player die when someone shoots him? How to make gun fire? How to add multiplayer support to my game? I'm not an artist and I'm alone working on this project. What advice would you like to give me?


Edited by newtechnology, 14 June 2014 - 01:23 AM.


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#2 Satharis   Members   -  Reputation: 1048

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 01:36 AM

What advice would you like to give me?

Set realistic goals.

It sounds like you're either getting frustrated or just tired of working on the same project. Spending 5 months just getting rendering working is a little strange to be honest, unless you've been working at it VERY rarely.

What I would do:

-Decide if you're fine with adding a lot more code to your game, if you are, then sit down and figure out what your goals are with your game. If you're having trouble deciding what to work on then do the "what would I play" test, think about the order of things you can add to your game that will make it fun to play around with. Is the game going to have enemies to shoot? Well networking is probably second of importance then if you can't even shoot enemies or be killed yet. Is it all networked and only PVP? Networking is probably a higher priority then so you can start testing the actual mechanics.

-If you feel like you're gonna snap if you keep working on your game for much longer, then sit down and think how you could round the game off. You could probably do without sound for example, or some very basic sound, focus on adding the few features to the game to make it more like a game. If anything the worst part of putting months of work into a project is the temptation to just abandon it, at least make it so when you pop it open again in the future it acts like a game.

Personally I would focus on making the shooting game have actual shooting and defeating enemies before the other stuff, add stuff either in gameplay order or in the order that most interests you if you're working by yourself.

#3 newtechnology   Members   -  Reputation: 783

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 01:50 AM

 

What advice would you like to give me?

Set realistic goals.

It sounds like you're either getting frustrated or just tired of working on the same project. Spending 5 months just getting rendering working is a little strange to be honest, unless you've been working at it VERY rarely.

What I would do:

-Decide if you're fine with adding a lot more code to your game, if you are, then sit down and figure out what your goals are with your game. If you're having trouble deciding what to work on then do the "what would I play" test, think about the order of things you can add to your game that will make it fun to play around with. Is the game going to have enemies to shoot? Well networking is probably second of importance then if you can't even shoot enemies or be killed yet. Is it all networked and only PVP? Networking is probably a higher priority then so you can start testing the actual mechanics.

-If you feel like you're gonna snap if you keep working on your game for much longer, then sit down and think how you could round the game off. You could probably do without sound for example, or some very basic sound, focus on adding the few features to the game to make it more like a game. If anything the worst part of putting months of work into a project is the temptation to just abandon it, at least make it so when you pop it open again in the future it acts like a game.

Personally I would focus on making the shooting game have actual shooting and defeating enemies before the other stuff, add stuff either in gameplay order or in the order that most interests you if you're working by yourself.

 

Thanks for the advice but I didn't had experience with DirectX Graphics API when I started the project. I was learning plus making the game at same time so it took that much time.


Edited by newtechnology, 14 June 2014 - 01:51 AM.


#4 Jason Z   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5163

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 01:56 PM


Thanks for the advice but I didn't had experience with DirectX Graphics API when I started the project. I was learning plus making the game at same time so it took that much time.

 

You shouldn't have to justify yourself - if you want to take 5 months doing graphics, then that is perfectly fine.  Maybe you only get to work on it once in a while, maybe you had an interruption, or maybe you are just learning how to do it.  It doesn't really matter, but what does matter is that you stay motivated.  If you are looking to learn about sound and network programming, then take another few months and learn about them.  Don't just your progress based only on the game - if you are doing this to learn, then judge yourself by how much you have learned in the project.

 

I like to keep a hand written journal of the work that I am doing, and document some successes and some failures too.  It helps to keep me realistic, and to see how much I have done over the past month or so.  Give it a try and see if it works for you too.



#5 BHXSpecter   Members   -  Reputation: 1627

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 06:23 PM


You shouldn't have to justify yourself - if you want to take 5 months doing graphics, then that is perfectly fine.

Exactly! How many companies do you see justify why they postpone games and then suddenly cancel them? Blizzard never justified why they finally canceled Starcraft Ghost. The reason is that they don't have to justify why they start and stop projects nor do they have to justify why it takes so long to make their game and the same goes for beginners and indies. Though, gamers would have you believe otherwise.

 


So I'm working on my fps game from last 5 months.

Maybe you can write up something like a blog that tells of the success and failures you have so other beginners looking to make a similar game can kind of see what they may encounter. Also include what challenges and hangups you encountered as you make it. Just a thought for you to consider.


"Through vengence I was born.Through war I was trained.Through love I was found. Through death I was released. Through release I was given a purpose."


#6 Buckeye   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5681

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 07:53 PM


Now I wish to study sound and networking ... I want to finish my game and work on another project. How to make player die when someone shoots him? How to make gun fire?

 

First, it appears that you, like many of us here on gamedev, are a hobbyist and you have a long list of things you want to learn about. That is, it seemes you aren't working for anyone but yourself, and actual distribution/sale of a game is not a priority (or perhaps not even an interest.) If so, you are responsible only to yourself, and whatever your decisions are with regard to the next step you take is strictly up to you. The only expectations you have to meet are those you have of yourself.

 

I empathize with the thought behind the phrase: "I want to finish, (but) I want to work on another project." Rather than "Is the current project finished?" perhaps it should be "Am I done working on the current project?"

 

It appears you're in the learning phase of the API. I myself started into D3D11 a few months ago. I now have 5 or 6 versions of an "engine" in my projects folder. Each version is better (to me) than the last. None of the versions are "finished," but I've learned a LOT about the API, and I've had fun doing it because I allow myself to start a new project when my interest changes. I'm responsible to no-one but me.

 

If you'd rather work on seeing what networking is about, or how to implement sounds, start a new project or add to your existing app to learn that part of the experience. As mentioned above, if that takes 12 days or 12 months, and you enjoyed the work, that's all that matters.


Edited by Buckeye, 14 June 2014 - 07:55 PM.

Please don't PM me with questions. Post them in the forums for everyone's benefit, and I can embarrass myself publicly.


#7 newtechnology   Members   -  Reputation: 783

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 11:31 PM

Thank you for all this advice. I now understood that it is not important to finish the project but it is important to learn more and more. I already have a journal and a blog but there were very few comments so i stopped posting. But i think i will do it now again.

#8 BHXSpecter   Members   -  Reputation: 1627

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Posted 15 June 2014 - 12:55 PM


I now understood that it is not important to finish the project but it is important to learn more and more.

Well yes and no. It is important to learn more, but if you plan to either publish it or use it in your portfolio then finishing the project is very important. Those are really the only two reasons to finish a game to as close to 100% as possible. Otherwise just keep plugging away and learning.


I already have a journal and a blog but there were very few comments so i stopped posting. But i think i will do it now again.

Lack of comments is never a reason to stop. When you solve a problem and blog about it you may be the person that helps another beginner understand what they missed or may give direction to a directionless beginner. If you stop, then they may never find that 'Aha!' moment. Okay, that may be drastic, but it is an honest truth.


"Through vengence I was born.Through war I was trained.Through love I was found. Through death I was released. Through release I was given a purpose."


#9 ankhd   Members   -  Reputation: 1322

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 09:50 PM

Wow. I've been working on my curret project for 8 years lol and I'm no where near anything Hehe and I love it.

 

first get your objects and all game things running, then look in to networking, but you may want to first make some small network chat app and get the fill of it first.

 

you may need to work on shooting since you stated how do I shoot stuff.

 

you will need to be able to move things in your game world, some math needed like vectors to move objects based on your frame delta.

 

what I did first was get the main graphics up and running, then get a sprite to move from one side of the screen to the other and go from what you learn.



#10 Scott Bruno   Members   -  Reputation: 198

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 10:27 AM

So I'm working on my fps game from last 5 months.I'm not an artist and I'm alone working on this project. What advice would you like to give me?

 

The best advice I have for you is simply to remember that you will not get everything right the first time. Or the second. Hell, I've been doing this professionally for 14 years and every time I start from scratch I build something better than I had before.

 

The point is every iteration of your systems and the overall structure is a learning experience. Get it working, keep good notes on what kinds of problems you end up with, and think about how you might have designed things differently to avoid those problems. Same goes for the game design. It's unlikely that your first game will be awesome, so don't let that put you off. As long as you keep learning and moving forward you'll be fine.






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