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Java or Python


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#1 Dalphin   Members   -  Reputation: 192

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 10:16 AM

Hello guys,

I'm want to learn a programming language for making first person games (for the future and beginning small ofcourse  :D).

Some people said to me that java is a good idea and maybe from there move on to c++ for the big game engines out there, so i started with the udacity course for Java, but now many people say to me that python is better and more easy to begin with.

What should i do now: learn java, or python.

BTW: is thew book serie head first (for java: head first java and for python: head first python) good for a beginner to learn the language.

Thanks :).



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#2 Shippou   Members   -  Reputation: 1720

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 02:45 PM

Python is great for learning basic programming for some one who is new to programming .

 I would recommend starting with this language before moving on with more complex programming languages.

Here are 2 good free Python Ebooks for new folks

Invent Your Own Computer Games With Python [ LINK ]

Python: How to Think Like a Computer Scientist [ LINK ]

 

A good IDE for Python is PyScripter [ LINK ]

 

 Attempting to learn a more complex language by yourself ( as a first language ) may result in becoming very frustrated, and eventually "burning out"

 

If you want to attempt Java as a first language, here is a very good free Ebook to look at [ LINK ]

 

A good Java IDE is Eclipse [ LINK ]


Edited by Shippou, 21 June 2014 - 02:46 PM.

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#3 SeraphLance   Members   -  Reputation: 1439

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 03:22 PM

I have a strong hatred for Java, so you shouldn't listen to anything I say about that language.  However, Python is fantastic for both novices and veterans.  It's very easy to get into, and deep enough that even for more seasoned programmers, there are lots of really cool things to be done.  Both Java and Python are popular languages to use in CS intro classes for good reasons.

 

I don't know much about books (especially beginner books, since I'm fairly out of touch with them and the ones I used to have were crap anyway), but there's an avalanche of tutorials out for both languages, and some of them are even actually good.


Edited by SeraphLance, 21 June 2014 - 03:23 PM.


#4 Lysy   Members   -  Reputation: 564

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 04:17 PM

Python is a great language, easy to learn, and easy to work with (e.g installing new modules.), so it's a good choice if you're starting programming, and want to start it an easy way.

As an IDE I would recommend Pycharm. It's got free 'community edition', and got everything you will need.



#5 GuardianX   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1529

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 02:57 AM

Java is very popular C/C++/C# alike (which means you will be able to grasp those languages fairly quick if you already know Java) object-oriented, performant language used almost in any sphere of the IT. I would strongly recommend you learn it, instead of Python, which is used for scripting tasks mainly and sometimes for backend development, but not by a mile as often as Java. Basic Java concepts are very easy to comprehend, too.



#6 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4588

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 03:30 AM

I prefer Java over Python. No ";"? Good, I like that. No braces? Well, not that bad, I use allman anyway. ":" after control blocks and function definitions? Now you're starting to annoy me.

 

Let me correct that, I prefer C "inspired" languages.

 

Now, if you're asking me whats best for learning: Any of them. You'll learn in both concepts that will be easily transferable to eachother.

 

Personally I'd recommend something a bit more "strict" just for learning, C maybe? Pascal? Something that isn't managed nor dynamically typed. You can get into some pretty bad habits by not caring about memory nor types.


Edited by TheChubu, 22 June 2014 - 03:30 AM.

"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

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#7 Dalphin   Members   -  Reputation: 192

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 05:06 AM

Hmm lots of different reactions.

For the people who recommend python: is it more easy to learn java (and then c++), after i've learned python

 

BTW: really thanks for the many reactions you guys gave me! 



#8 Lysy   Members   -  Reputation: 564

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 06:19 AM

Python and C++ are whole different languages. I think knowledge of any programming language will make learning another one a little bit easier, just not as much easier as you probably hope. Regardless of your knowledge of Python or Java, you'll have to spend some time on learning C++ anyway. Python is good for start, for introducing the basic concepts of programming, this is why I recommend it personally for a beginner.



#9 Herwin P   Members   -  Reputation: 642

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 07:43 AM

If you're really new to programming, I suggest you to pick Python first. It's cleaner and doesn't stress newbies with syntax error. Of course, discipline is important, but what I'm trying to say is that it won't stress you as much in the beginning. It's easy to get started with. Learning logic and stuff. It's not as... deep as C++, yes, but it's not like you will need to play with memory and other low level stuff in the beginning.

 

Also, like others have said, Python is great for both veterans and beginners alike. I happen to know a very good Python tutorial, here.



#10 SeraphLance   Members   -  Reputation: 1439

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 10:21 AM

Hmm lots of different reactions.

For the people who recommend python: is it more easy to learn java (and then c++), after i've learned python

 

BTW: really thanks for the many reactions you guys gave me! 

 

Python is an interpreted language. while the other two are (mostly) compiled languages, so there are some differences there.  By and large though, learning any of the three is going to make learning the other two much easier, since they share a great many similarities. However, the hardest things about a language like C++ (stuff like memory management and synchronization) are going to be shielded from you in both Java and Python.



#11 dmatter   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3263

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 10:31 AM

As a beginning language I think both Python and Java are equally fine, I honestly don't think Python is easier than Java. Both are great choices to learn programming. Python is a richer language, so there are more concepts to learn perhaps but it's precisely those things I miss when working in Java (although the latest Java and future versions are improving that situation), you won't miss them at all as a beginner though.

For making games they both have a solid set of frameworks available for the Desktop but Java wins out when it comes to web and mobile platforms.

Neither language really prepares you for C++, while Java is cosmetically more similar looking in appearance it's just a totally different experience. Java and Python are similar enough even though they look quite different, while C++ is something unto itself. Nothing about C++ should influence a decision about whether to choose a Python or Java.

In the long run you'll learn both, I've no doubt. It doesn't matter which you start with, both are fine choices.




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