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from python to c++


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#1 Dalphin   Members   -  Reputation: 194

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 01:49 PM

Hello everyone,

A few weeks ago i started searching for a goog programming language for a beginner.

I always wanted to start immidiately with c++, but ofcourse many people said to me that C++

would maybe be not the best language to start with, as it could discourage a beginner and they 

advised me to start with python, so that's what i did. I know some basics now (like if, while statement, etc.),

but today i met some people which started learning C++ together. Some of them are more experienced,

so they can help eachother if they get stuck. They asked me to join to and let python go.

My question is now: What should i do. I mean i'm learning python now (altought i'm not that far), but 

I think this may be a great chance to learn C++, because it's in a group , unfortunately i'm not sure about it.

So i hope you guys can give me some advice on what to do.

 

Thanks.

Dalphin



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#2 tp9   Members   -  Reputation: 533

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 02:00 PM

I'd go for it. I love learning in groups. Just keep an open mind because sometimes the group fizzles and you'll be on your own again, but that's okay.

 

EDIT: I came up with some additional thoughts. This experience is good on multiple levels but 2 that come to mind is

 

1. The experience of learning a language with people who are already familiar with it.

 

2. Getting exposed to a new language is always beneficial. You can determine if you like it or not and move on if you don't like it.

 

I've had exposure to about a half dozen languages and there are things I like and don't like with each one. So far off the top of my head I've had exposure to JavaScript, Python, Ruby, PL/SQL, SQL, VB, VB.net, VB for Applications, C++, Java, and Assembly.

 

So if you love programming, like me, you'll be exposed to a lot of languages over the course of your career in programming. Learn to love the experience. Good luck and welcome to development!

 

Signed,

Lover of languages


Edited by tp9, 01 July 2014 - 02:13 PM.


#3 dejaime   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4119

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 02:14 PM

Remember that the languages are your tools. You re using them, not the opposite.

Just like hammer and screwdrivers have different uses, so does languages.

 

Get your hands dirty with C++ but don't simply let Python go. Learning C++ ain't a good reason to abandon Python, they can only complement each other.


Edited by dejaime, 01 July 2014 - 02:17 PM.


#4 Dalphin   Members   -  Reputation: 194

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 02:43 PM

So is it possible for a beginner such as me to try to learn c++ (In this group), and sometimes work with python (So i won't forget everything that i've learned till now)

(And ofcoure, in the future when i know noth, use them together.)


Edited by Dalphin, 01 July 2014 - 02:45 PM.


#5 tp9   Members   -  Reputation: 533

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 02:50 PM

So is it possible for a beginner such as me to try to learn c++ (In this group), and sometimes work with python (So i won't forget everything that i've learned till now)

(And ofcoure, in the future when i know noth, use them together.)

I forget stuff all the time. It's impossible to remember everything about every language. The important thing is knowing how to look up the answer either in your notes or on the web. It comes with practice but the more you do it the better you'll become at doing this. Places like StackExchange can be intimidating at first but once you learn how to read and understand the responses it will boost your programming ability a lot. You'll have the freedom to start learning almost anything and when you get stuck you can Google for the answers or even ask here for specific game development questions.

 

Plus you have the advantage of having friends who are experienced programmers. It's a no-lose situation IMO. Worst case you find out you don't actually like programming then no harm no foul. You can move on to something you do like and have the benefit of having had the experience.

 

Above all, remember to have fun! If you aren't then no sense wasting time banging your head against the same wall.

 

BTW, can you tell that I LOVE programming. But I've had the benefit of doing soul-sucking work for 5 years before getting into development.


Edited by tp9, 01 July 2014 - 02:52 PM.


#6 Dalphin   Members   -  Reputation: 194

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 02:58 PM

Okay that's helpfull. I just gonna try it a few lessons and then see if i can go on with C++ or move back to Python and learn C++ if i master it.

THANKS ALL!



#7 DavitosanX   Members   -  Reputation: 303

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Posted 03 July 2014 - 10:43 AM

I found this site very helpful when I started learning C++. I hope it helps you too.

 

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/

 

Also, try out different IDE's. Choosing the one that feels most comfortable to you is crucial, because it makes the whole experience a lot less frustrating. Personally, I ended up using gedit and g++.

 

Good luck on your endeavors!


Starting out in game programming? Me too! Check out my blog, written by a newbie, for the newbies. http://myowngamejourney.blogspot.mx/





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