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How to Export from 3DMax, GMax, to OpenGL


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#1 Cydriic   Members   -  Reputation: 139

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 07:37 AM

Hi Everyone, 

 

I'm looking for an efficient way to export my 3D Models from 3DSMax, or GMax to OpenGL.

 

Up to now the only way I found was to use a script that creates an .OBJ file from the 3D Scene, and then plug in the Vertices' Coordinates  in my code.

 

Is there and even faster way?

 

 

 

Thanks



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#2 Jan2go   Members   -  Reputation: 696

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 07:52 AM

From 3DS Max you can simply export your meshes using the integrated exporter. No need for any additional scripts.
To import the meshes into OpenGL you can use libraries like the FBX SDK or Assimp to get the vertex data from the file. Then you use this data to fill your OpenGL buffers.

#3 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4062

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 08:24 AM


I'm looking for an efficient way to export my 3D Models from 3DSMax, or GMax to OpenGL.
Let see...

 

Code your own model loader:

 

Export to XYZ format, code a loader for your game that assembles the data in a way it can be consumed by OpenGL.

 

Code your own exporter:

 

Code an exporter for 3DMax that exports the geometry data into a format of your own (preferably binary, which is compact and faster to load than text files). 

 

Code your own tool:

 

Export into XYZ format, and use an offline tool that can convert it to a format of your own that can be easily uploaded to OpenGL.

 

Using your own binary format would be the fastest way to get data from the disk to the GPU, coding an exporter for 3DMax would be the most convenient. Coding an importer in your application might be the less amount of work but decoding the data won't be as fast as reading binary and plugging it to a buffer.


"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

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#4 HappyCoder   Members   -  Reputation: 2556

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 02:57 PM

I think the best way to go about this is to create a mesh loader base class. This would be an abstract class so you would likely only have a single load mesh method. You then create multiple base classes, each base class loads a different file format. You could have your obj file loader, an fbx loader, or even your custom file format. I would also strongly recommend you use existing loading libraries. Assimp lib3DS. You then have a manager class that holds all of these loaders. When you ask the manager to load a file, it looks at the extension and decides which loader to use.

 

This way, you can add any number of loaders easily. You can use obj, 3ds, or any other format in development. Then, if you need to improve loading times, you can write a utility program that converts the obj or 3ds format into your own custom binary format that is designed to load quickly. You would then add a mesh loader for your custom format.



#5 Thinias   Members   -  Reputation: 139

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:58 PM

HappyCoder's suggestions are very good.  In some ways, the answer here depends on what you mean by efficiency... but in general, if you need to ask questions like the above, you aren't going to create a more efficient solution than importing someone else's library.

 

If you meant efficiency from a "I need to get this running yesterday" perspective, a library that already does the work for you will almost always be the best answer.  HappyCoder has given you examples.

 

If you meant efficiency from a runtime perspective, unless you've done this before you're unlikely to produce a faster answer.  Worse, your answer may be inadvertantly incomplete, resulting in faster loads but worse performance after loading time is complete.






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