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XNA vs Other


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#1 tmer1   Members   -  Reputation: 139

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 02:57 AM

Hi,

 

I am taking a short course in programming games in C#, about 70hrs class time. I have no previous knowledge of programming. 

 

In class we will be using XNA, but I have a Macbook at home to work with. I know I cannot use XNA on the Mac, but will I be able to copy code from XNA and paste into another Mac friendly program ?

Or am I better of borrowing an old windows laptop to work on homework ?

 

 

-also, if I intend to make simple 2D games for smartphone (on my macbook) should I be using Xamarin or Unity ? 



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#2 Ashaya   Members   -  Reputation: 135

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:03 AM

Personally, [And I may be wrong] my knowledge is that XNA and Macs, even Mac friendly applications, don't get along with each other as seamlessly and efficiently as borrowing a old Windows computer would be, especially since your professor is almost certainly going to be assuming you are using a Windows computer. Using a Mac may have unfortunate side effects that could lower your grade. The likelihood of this isn't guaranteed, but I would personally not take it.

Unity is [usually] used for 3D game design, so I would use Xam, as it is more streamlined and efficient for your purposes, which is making smartphone games.

And yes, Xam does run on Macs, thankfully.


Edited by Sirvivir, 12 July 2014 - 03:05 AM.

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#3 tmer1   Members   -  Reputation: 139

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:17 AM

Ok thanks,

 

Don't care about grades, just wondering if using Mac at home would involve  2x  or more work.

 

Would it be possible to bring Mac to class and just work on that with a little pre knowledge of Xamarin tools ? after all both is using same language, C#..



#4 Ashaya   Members   -  Reputation: 135

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:24 AM

I see no reason on why that wouldn't work, however, I would ask your professor to make sure he's cool with it.
His opinion matters far more than mine, on that matter.


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~Currently designing a throwback 2D Side Scrolling game inspired by Kung Fu for the NES.

 


#5 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 32041

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:27 AM

You can just install windows on your MacBook as well as OSX. Then you can use OSX for your personal stuff and Windows for your homework.

#6 Ashaya   Members   -  Reputation: 135

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:29 AM

^Thats true, using bootcamp or the like for running Windows. I hadn't thought of that.
Heres a link.
http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1461


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~Currently designing a throwback 2D Side Scrolling game inspired by Kung Fu for the NES.

 


#7 tmer1   Members   -  Reputation: 139

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:37 AM

no I don't want to mess up my Macbook, its already 4 years old, and can act up occasionally.

 

I found an old PC laptop , real anteic it's from like 2007...  windows XP. I will use it for first few weeks and if I gain some confidence with messing around on Xamarin, i'll ask my teacher if I can just use my Mac and Xamarin in class.

 

 

Do you guys know any good tutorials for beginner programming using Xamarin ?



#8 Ashaya   Members   -  Reputation: 135

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:46 AM

http://developer.xamarin.com/guides/

Good luck.
 


Edited by Sirvivir, 12 July 2014 - 03:48 AM.

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~Currently designing a throwback 2D Side Scrolling game inspired by Kung Fu for the NES.

 


#9 Karsten_   Members   -  Reputation: 1655

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:25 AM

Microsoft used to come around University telling the students that XNA is deprecated in favour of MonoGame (an open-source XNA clone). The VisualStudio IDE used to crash every time they did a demonstration of the content pipeline with MonoGame biggrin.png

http://www.monogame.net

At risk of getting a lower grade because of minor differences between the two, I can't suggest that you use it. But you should probably evaluate it yourself and make the choice.

Your tutor might respect the fact that you are looking outside the box and towards solving issues of portability (a major topic within the game development industry).

If you are stuck with C#, an option that I would personally suggest is OpenTK. It is basically a very portable (and pretty thin) .NET binding around OpenGL, OpenAL etc. Anything you learn here will almost directly be translatable in later life to C, C++ or other languages using OpenGL. Including Javascript and WebGL (or preferably Emscripten).
For 2D you should find it pretty easy. For 3D naturally it becomes a more steep learning curve because you will be learning the fundamentals of modern 3D graphics programming rather than just scripting and automating products like Unity.

http://www.opentk.com

Edited by Karsten_, 12 July 2014 - 05:34 AM.

Mutiny - Open-source C++ Unity re-implementation.
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#10 LordRhys   Members   -  Reputation: 367

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 07:05 AM

Monogame would be the better choice, they are close to getting the content pipeline working on its own but what you can do is develop the content pipeline info i.e. the .xnb files in class and copy them into the monogame solution. Currently that is how Monogame uses content resources anyway. Your code would be the same between both with maybe a few minor changes. Monogame is cross-platform capable so you can convert your game to a smartphone.

#11 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4839

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 04:35 PM


Your tutor might respect the fact that you are looking outside the box and towards solving issues of portability (a major topic within the game development industry).
Now that would be a sight to behold, my tutor scolded me for trying Lazarus instead of Delphi :D (I had a linux box so Delphi wasn't an option).

"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

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#12 blewisjr   Members   -  Reputation: 622

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:54 PM

 


Your tutor might respect the fact that you are looking outside the box and towards solving issues of portability (a major topic within the game development industry).
Now that would be a sight to behold, my tutor scolded me for trying Lazarus instead of Delphi biggrin.png (I had a linux box so Delphi wasn't an option).

 

Heh I had a teacher scold me for using GCC + Makefiles + Vim in my C++ class because it was all I had available at the time due to a computer explosion.  Apparently Visual Studio is the only way to write C/C++ now a days in school.



#13 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22812

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 08:56 PM

Your tutor might respect the fact that you are looking outside the box and towards solving issues of portability (a major topic within the game development industry).

Now that would be a sight to behold, my tutor scolded me for trying Lazarus instead of Delphi :D (I had a linux box so Delphi wasn't an option).
Heh I had a teacher scold me for using GCC + Makefiles + Vim in my C++ class because it was all I had available at the time due to a computer explosion.  Apparently Visual Studio is the only way to write C/C++ now a days in school.
Not sure if that is just a bad school, or if it is a real trend.

Both undergrad and grad were mixed environments. At undergrad the department head maintained a VAX-11 that he used for the assembly course, labs included an O2 lab for graphics and another with NeXT boxes. Grad school had a mix of machines from supercomputers to standard windows and linux boxes.

I cannot see how any research school would not have a complement of *nix boxes in the CS department.

Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.





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