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Game programming curriculum. Feedback please !

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#1 sadek   Members   -  Reputation: 121

Posted 24 July 2014 - 06:22 AM

Game programming curriculum. Feedback please!

 

"English isn't my native language so there are probably some mistakes. Also I hope this post is allowed in this section, still not sure."   
 
Hey guys and gals,  

I'm pretty new in the whole gamedev scene. I worked myself through various basic topics and really like it so far. Still i got one major problem,

everytime i came across a new topic it was necessary to already have a certain set of skills wich I didn't had most of the time, because i started

learning in a wrong order. So after quite a bit of research, reading, more reading and even more reading i came to a conclusion.

Maybe i should build a little curriculum (guide) for myself with wich i can work my way through to all the major and minor topics. So did i, kind of.  
 
little sidenote -
"Right now it's only like a curriculum for game programming, not game design in general. I probably build up a new curriculum for game design

too after i'm finished with this one, wich can take a little while"  
 

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Please bare in mind this is a feedback post. I'm pretty sure i'll missed important parts i still didn't even know of. If this is true please leave feedback

in a form like this ( I also appreciate general feedback. Do you like this idea yes why, no why ? ... )  . 
 
topic I already mentioned:
 
Topic
  - What is bad and if it is why
  - how could i improve it
  - any good readings or general infos on this topic i havent included
 
topic I did not include so far:  
 
[NEW] Topic
  - Why is this topic important 
  - any good readings or general infos on this topic  
 
I know I ask for alot of things here, but I think if we structure this topic well this could be a major 
help for all the beginners out there wich are struggling like me, it would help the 
overall readability of this post and I could work through the feedback faster.  

 

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1. General programming  
 I choosed general programming as a starting point, because it is a game programming curriculum
so it should be self explaining. Before the programming language war beginns. I choosed c++
because I already feel confident in basic programming. It's still a beast and i would recommend everyone
completly new to programming to start with an easier programming language. ( I started with Java )  

 

useful links and books

 

1. TheNewBoston Tutorials

I would recommend this for everyone who is tired of reading books, he gives a nice introduction to c++ but I

would still prefer a book.

 

 

2. C Primer Plus and after this C++ Primer

If you really want to get the hang of C++ you should read C Primer Plus and then C++ Primer, it wont give you

everything you need but you'll have the base to go on to more advanced topics.

 

 

3. [GER] C++ das umfassende Handbuch 3. Auflage

A really good german c++ book 

 

1.5.1 Game programming patterns  
 
Everytime i tried to write my own programm or little game i struggled keeping the clode clean. I recommend everyone who finished

the first part, too read through this first before going on. It is a really great book, it will help you to structure your code and prevent

some serious headaches.  

 

Link:
http://gameprogrammingpatterns.com/

 

 
1.5.2 Math  
 
Simple as it is, if you want to advance into the next topics you have to know math.  
 
- basis arithmetics
- Vectors
- Matrices
...  
 
Don't know what i am talking about ?
Then you should definitly look up those topics!

 
2. Graphics programming  
 
If you want to be a game programmer you have to visualize your game somehow. After getting all the knowledge you need on how to write code

and how structure it, it's time to move on to the graphics part. 
 
useful links and books:
 
1. Realtime rendering 3th edition

Jeah, thats pretty much the book to go, nuff said. Please also read the SuperBible.  
 

 

2. OpenGL SuperBible 6th edition

Got great critics so far, can only recommend it. It introduces you to graphics programming in OpenGL. 

 

 

3. TheBennyBox

For the Java guys this is a youtube channel wich created a whole tutorial on programming a game engine in Java and LWJGL the

openGL library for Java. They are structured very nice and definitly worth a watch. Also he started a new tutorial series on modern

openGL with C++, have fun.
 

 

4. ChilliToomatoNoodle

It's also a guy on youtube, he features directX programming in a tutorial series. Starting from 0 programming knowledge to advanced topics

and he also got his own forum for his community.

 

 
3. Game Engine Archtecture  
 
Okay my knowledge stops right here but i think it's logical to go in this direction. By now you should have all the necessary skills to handle

this topic. It's very advanced and requires alot of effort.  

 
I only got one useful book so far, it gets recommended everywhere and has very nice critics BUT game engine architecture is a very broad topic

itself, so after reading this book you should probably advance into more specific topics of the game engine itself.  
 

1. 3D Game Engine Architecture

As i already said, i only heard good things about it so far. Im not sure there may be an even newer version out then this, but

even for todays standarts it should be still usefull. ( edit. there should be a newer version out there in August )

   
 
4. ...

 

5. ...  

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

This should probably be longer but my current knowledge is definitly not enough to make profound decisions on where to go from here. 
I hope there are no major mistakes so far. If you got feedback PLEASE write it down here I would really much appreciate it. I take any critics you got. 

 
I'll edit this post everytime i got new things to add.

 
Thanks for your attention smile.png


Edited by sadek, 24 July 2014 - 12:32 PM.


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#2 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1617

Posted 24 July 2014 - 09:32 AM

I'm having an incredibly difficult time reading and understanding your post.  BUT... I can say this:

 


- 3D Game Engine Architecture ( As i already said, i only heard good things about it so far.
Im not sure there may be an even newer version out then this, but even for todays standarts it should be still usefull)

 

Yes, there is a new version (out this summer, I think).  I've got the current version and it is a FANTASTIC book.  While I'm not interested in designing my own game engine, understanding the nut-'n'-bolts and behind the scenes processes made it worth the multiple readings.  For me, a designer, it gave me a really good foundation to effectively communicate with programmers.

 

You will lose nothing by reading this.  You can only gain.


I don't even like games anymore.


#3 sadek   Members   -  Reputation: 121

Posted 24 July 2014 - 10:24 AM

Hey, thanks for your feedback. Jeah i was pretty sure that there is a newer version of this book somewhere out there, just couldnt find it !

 

 

 

I'm having an incredibly difficult time reading and understanding your post.  BUT... I can say this:

 

 

 

Okay, thanks for letting me know. Can you point out particular portions of the text? Would be nice :)



#4 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1617

Posted 24 July 2014 - 11:13 AM


Okay, thanks for letting me know. Can you point out particular portions of the text? Would be nice

 

Well, it's more the whole thing.  Capitalization, punctuation, etc., would be great.

 

Also, are you using this as a buying guide for yourself?  I mean, do you want opinions of the resources you list?

 


Hey, thanks for your feedback. Jeah i was pretty sure that there is a newer version of this book somewhere out there, just couldnt find it !

 

You may need to wait a month -- August 2014 is the street day (I think).  It does seem to have a big chunk of new material, particularly on rendering.


I don't even like games anymore.


#5 sadek   Members   -  Reputation: 121

Posted 24 July 2014 - 11:56 AM

Well, it's more the whole thing.  Capitalization, punctuation, etc., would be great.

 

Hehe, jeah. Think i have to work on this then.

 

Also, are you using this as a buying guide for yourself?  I mean, do you want opinions of the resources you list?

 

This was my plan, yes. I wanted to gather some advice first, improve the list and then work my way thorugh it.

 

*edit

Also my initial goal was to constantly improve this post and keep it up-to-date, so other beginners will have an overview of all the major topics surrounding game programming in a structured way and some useful links to books or other sources of information. The reason I am doing this is because sometime ago I was constantly looking for something like this and haven't found anything yet, only really old blog posts wich are outdated. So, I thought im doing it myself with the help of the community !

 

You may need to wait a month -- August 2014 is the street day (I think).  It does seem to have a big chunk of new material, particularly on rendering.

 

Thanks, guess i'll wait a month for it.


Edited by sadek, 24 July 2014 - 12:46 PM.


#6 Pink Horror   Members   -  Reputation: 1140

Posted 24 July 2014 - 07:45 PM

There should probably be something about algorithms. If there's one book any programmer should have, it's Introduction to Algorithms: http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/introduction-algorithms.

 

For the math section, to start to learn how to apply all those vectors and geometry and such to a game, this book is very useful: http://realtimecollisiondetection.net/

 

Those are my two favorites.



#7 BHXSpecter   Members   -  Reputation: 1441

Posted 24 July 2014 - 10:49 PM


 
1. TheNewBoston Tutorials
I would recommend this for everyone who is tired of reading books, he gives a nice introduction to c++ but I
would still prefer a book.

 

 

2. C Primer Plus and after this C++ Primer
If you really want to get the hang of C++ you should read C Primer Plus and then C++ Primer, it wont give you
everything you need but you'll have the base to go on to more advanced topics.

 
3. [GER] C++ das umfassende Handbuch 3. Auflage
A really good german c++ book 

From what I have read and been told the NewBoston tutorials and C++ Primer Plus are on the list of what to avoid for learning programming. Can't comment on the german book as I don't know german (only know English [native] and Spanish [2 years, but majorly rusty]).

 

I would replace them with:

 

1) Programming Practices and Principles Using C++ 2nd Edition 

Is a book designed to help you learn to program (if you have never programmed before) using C++ as a tool. It is also the intro course book for several degrees at Texas A&M University. Not to mention it is written by Bjarne Stroustrup himself.
 

2) C++ Primer 5th Edition

The usual recommendation for Beginner C++, but that phrase is a little misleading. It isn't a book for someone who as never programmed, but rather a book for a programmer who is experienced in another language and looking to learn C++ now. It covers C++ more in-depth.
 

3) The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference

Covers the standard library in-depth. 
 

4) The C++ Programming Language (as a reference)

I recommend this purely as a reference book. It too is written by Bjarne Stroustrup. You can certainly read it cover to cover if you like, but it makes a better reference than a book about learning due to its technical nature.


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