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Chances of getting Blackmoor Bay crowdfunded


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#1 Darkmill   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 06:25 AM

Hey,

 

    Seeing that this is probably the biggest forum for game developers I thought i'd post my question here as well.

 

My original post on TIGSource :

 

"Hello everyone!

After lurking around the forums for some time now I've decided to create an account to ask a question that's been bugging me for a while now.
Let me start

I am THE sole developer of this little game :

  http://www.indiedb.com/games/blackmoor-bay

I am currently developing it using Unity Free and I handle everything except most of the 3D ( Most of the models are bought from the asset store and some edited to suit my needs) and music.
The thing is that while Unity Free is ok and allows me to finish the game , Unity Pro would really help in making it look nicer/more atmospheric.

So I've been thinking of having an Indiegogo(Cannot use kickstarter due to country) campaign in the future( when I have the trailer out and the game is nearing release). The campaign will focus on getting enough money for 2 things : Unity Pro and voice acting.

For this I plan to have a campaign for about 5000 dollars max.

Based on your experiences with both your games and based on what you can see about my game, any estimates on the chances of it getting funded?

Because making an Indiegogo campaign will take some time and if it'd more likely to fail those resources are better invested in finishing the game faster .

Also any feedback is appreciated.

Thanks!"

 

Some further clarifications :

 

- My game is an adventure game/ interactive story , similar to games like Gone Home, Lifeless Planet and Dear Esther. You explore the island, find clues and solve puzzles. There is no combat, survival , crafting elements. Just a story to unfold and  location to explore.

 

- I hope to gather responses from people that actually had experiences with crowdfunding , positive or negative , but educated guesses help as well

 

 

Thanks !-

 



Sponsor:

#2 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1641

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 10:49 AM

I've been involved with three crowd-funding projects (one table-top game, one video game, one musical project), none of them as the founder/owner.  The tabletop-game (an RPG from a known designer) tripled its goal well before the target date.  The video game (Turn-based RPG, Sci-Fi) didn't get to 1%. The musical project (a recording) from a well known guitarist is stalling at 38% at the halfway point.

 

So, based on these experiences and a few other word-of-mouth anecdotes, I fell confident in saying that unless you have a proven track record with excited customers or 500 friends willing to give you $10 each, you'll likely put a lot of time into a marketing campaign that won't pay off.

 

To be honest, I wouldn't back it.  Nothing makes me want to pay you to make a game you will then sell to other people.  Maybe a good video review from a reliable source would change my mind or spark my interest.


Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.


#3 Darkmill   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 03:10 PM

    Hey thanks for your input and I do see your point, but one thing bugs me. You paying for a game that i will sell to other people. Doesn;t that apply to every game on kickstarter/indiegogo? I mean you will get the game for free for donating a certain amount (cheaper than the release) and I will probably include some other perks as well if people want to give more substantial donations. But I'm not really sure what you meant with that statement.

 

Other than that yea  I do feel that it might be prone to fail before it even begins because of some of the reasons you mentioned and others. That's why I'm asking people with experience.



#4 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1641

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 10:05 AM


but one thing bugs me. You paying for a game that i will sell to other people. Doesn;t that apply to every game on kickstarter/indiegogo?

 

Absolutely!  I didn't mean it to sound personal at all -- it wasn't about me and you, it was more of a comment on crowd-funding's bizzaro finances.  I've had the same criticism of it from the start, even though I back plenty of things.  Many people think it is a fine model for accomplishing projects, but the inner capitalist in me just thinks of it as investment without ownership, equity, or royalties.

 

And while you might release your game at a higher price point to non-backers, that hasn't always been the case in the past.  It's a muddy topic and my thoughts on it are all pretty negative, so you may want to ignore my cranky old-guy ramblings of "Get yer Kickie-Go-Go off my lawn!" with a grain of salt.

 

But the real question is: What WOULD make someone like me want to back your project? 

 

That's easy: I would be swayed by some third-party reviews and proof positive that with the right contributions the game will be finished.  Maybe you could start showcasing a single "level" or chunk of gameplay that you could give to reviewers or send to the guys at Rock, Paper, Shotgun (or similar place).

 

I sincerely wish you luck.  I hope I didn't sound down on your game (which seems like something I'd buy on release) when I was trying to be down on your current marketing (which doesn't grab me).


Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.


#5 Darkmill   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 12:54 PM

Thanks for clearing that up . I never felt it was personal, was just puzzled by your stance :) 

 

I do plan of sending stuff to review sites and especially RPS, but that means polishing specific content while the game as a whole is not finished , which does mess with your workflow and I wanted to postpone that until close to release but it seems i might have to do it faster if i want coverage.

 

Thanks for your replies so far. They were really helpful so far.



#6 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 28729

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 01:17 PM

First, the chances of getting your project enough money are very slim.
 
Then, once you get the money, the chances of actually completing it are slim.
 
What kind of experience do you have?  Your site says you have 4 years of industry experience, but it seems like you have no idea about the budget of games.
 
Do you KNOW the costs to develop the game you have in mind? 
 
You say you want a total of $5000. With that paltry amount of money, you want:

  • A gripping story told from multiple points of view.
  • Freely explore a living,breathing island , each place with it's own history to uncover.
  • Dark , wet and gloomy atmosphere.
  • Interactive world.Almost every object can be picked up, moved or used.

For $5000 you can afford two or three weeks of total development time. That is one individual for less than a month. What you described usually takes 30+ people more than a year of effort, costing millions of dollars.

 

With that much money you might be able to meet your funding goal, but you will likely be in the two thirds of products that don't deliver a finished, polished game.


Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.


#7 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1641

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 01:18 PM


Thanks for clearing that up . I never felt it was personal, was just puzzled by your stance smile.png

 

I aim to confuse!

 

 

 


but that means polishing specific content while the game as a whole is not finished , which does mess with your workflow and I wanted to postpone that until close to release but it seems i might have to do it faster if i want coverage.

 

It is a double edged sword, but taking the time to do it now might give you the boost in attention you need to get some buzz and fans.


Edited by GoCatGo, 25 July 2014 - 01:19 PM.

Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.


#8 Darkmill   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 02:14 PM

First, the chances of getting your project enough money are very slim.
 
Then, once you get the money, the chances of actually completing it are slim.
 
What kind of experience do you have?  Your site says you have 4 years of industry experience, but it seems like you have no idea about the budget of games.
 
Do you KNOW the costs to develop the game you have in mind? 
 
You say you want a total of $5000. With that paltry amount of money, you want:

  • A gripping story told from multiple points of view.
  • Freely explore a living,breathing island , each place with it's own history to uncover.
  • Dark , wet and gloomy atmosphere.
  • Interactive world.Almost every object can be picked up, moved or used.

For $5000 you can afford two or three weeks of total development time. That is one individual for less than a month. What you described usually takes 30+ people more than a year of effort, costing millions of dollars.

 

With that much money you might be able to meet your funding goal, but you will likely be in the two thirds of products that don't deliver a finished, polished game.

 

Hey thanks for the rather brutal reply. But let me clear up a few things.

 

The cost of development is 0 starting now. Well 0 financially. The cost is probably go pretty high on my mental stability once the project reaches the latter stages. I have a full time job in the industry. So I don't count my cost of living in the budget. 

 

I have already bought slowly over the course of  a few months all the assets I will be using for about 500-600 dollars total. It's amazing how many cool things you can find on the asset store if you look and have just a bit of 3d knowledge to modify them where needed.

 

 

I have been working on this for about 6 months or so and  it's over 50% done.

 

The story  and the flow is written already.

The level design is done 70% ish. Needs polish

The systems are working, just need polish( journal system, map system, object interaction system weather system etc). You need not forget that this game involves no combat . It was relatively easy to write the code for all the systems I use.

The island is quite small ( around 500m in length)

 I'm currently working on putting the flow from the paper to the actual game (about 20% done i'd estimate).

The game is quite short. It will take the same time to complete as the games mentioned above. 3-4 hours if you take your time and explore the island.

 

I am the only person directly working on the game and I plan to keep it that way, since I am confident I am able to release this alone. I do have someone writing the music , but other than that , it's just me and me alone. I have hopes of releasing it in mid december, but that's me being optimistic. But I should be able to release it sometime in Q1 next year if not.

 

The money I want to raise will be used for 2 things : Unity Pro and paying voice actors. That is all. I do not plan to hire programmers or 3D artists with it. Maybe purchase a few more assets packs from the asset store if I find something that looks nice and fits.

 

 

Well I don't know what else to say at this point. That's the gist of things and hopefully it clears a few things up smile.png


Edited by Darkmill, 25 July 2014 - 02:34 PM.


#9 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1641

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 10:54 AM

I would ignore frob's entire reply, even though every bit of it was truth for certain situations.

 

You are obviously not asking for crowdfunding support to pay a team or yourself.  You need assets (audio, models, textures, whatever).  Why not create a really detailed list of what you think you need to finish, why you need it, and how it adds value?  While "I need $5,000 for this," sound iffy, a statement of "I need $X for this, $XX for this, and $XXX for that," would lend more credibility to any fundraising campaign.

 

Also, I know you didn't ask this question, but I'm going to give you a suggestion anyway.  If you live in a town or city of moderate size, there are likely many small audio production studios.  Most of them struggle to turn over studio time. I've moved all of my musical rehearsals and band auditions to a recording studio because I can pay them by the hour, they want my business (even though I'm not recording), and it is easier than having strangers show up at my house.  Contact a small studio and tell them what you need to do (voice acting, sound effects, mixing, whatever).  You'll be amazed at what they throw together talent-wise just to get you to buy several hours at the studio.  Plus the recordings will be better that what most solo devs can do at home.


Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.


#10 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 24366

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 11:13 AM

I didn't mean it to sound personal at all -- it wasn't about me and you, it was more of a comment on crowd-funding's bizzaro finances.  I've had the same criticism of it from the start, even though I back plenty of things.  Many people think it is a fine model for accomplishing projects, but the inner capitalist in me just thinks of it as investment without ownership, equity, or royalties.

 

Does the same thought process apply to developers using KickStarter merely to "launch" projects that are only a month or two out from release? That is, it's more clearly a pre-order, because the game is at this point almost entirely created.


Edited by Servant of the Lord, 26 July 2014 - 11:14 AM.

It's perfectly fine to abbreviate my username to 'Servant' rather than copy+pasting it all the time.
All glory be to the Man at the right hand... On David's throne the King will reign, and the Government will rest upon His shoulders. All the earth will see the salvation of God.
Of Stranger Flames - [indie turn-based rpg set in a para-historical French colony] | Indie RPG development journal

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#11 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1641

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 09:18 AM


Does the same thought process apply to developers using KickStarter merely to "launch" projects that are only a month or two out from release? That is, it's more clearly a pre-order, because the game is at this point almost entirely created.

 

I try not to let my thought processes overlap.  They tend to be single-use items, these thought processes of mine.

 

I am pretty jaded when it comes to Kickstarter and its ilk.  I would be more likely to ignore a "lauch" crowdfuning campaign (as you describe) than a well presented "We need marketing money" kind of thing.  It really depends on my wildy vacillating moods, I guess.


Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.


#12 Unduli   Members   -  Reputation: 1443

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 02:38 PM

Although using IndieGoGo instead of Kickstarter worries me (theoretically I can't have KS campaign as well) , IndieGoGo has "advantage" of flexible funding which allows you to get money whether fully funded or not.

 

So you might also consider something like "my goal is $1000, if I hit $5000 you get better environment (a nicer way of saying I'll get Unity Pro) and voice acting" , that way you at least sell copies anyway.



#13 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1641

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 08:36 AM


So you might also consider something like "my goal is $1000, if I hit $5000 you get better environment (a nicer way of saying I'll get Unity Pro) and voice acting" , that way you at least sell copies anyway.

 

I disagree -- I think full disclosure is the way to go.  I'd me more inclined to fund something like: First $1500 gets the upgrade to the "Pro" engine, the next chunk adds this, that, or the other.  I've already stated I'm a cranky, pessimistic old coot, so "I need $1000 and $5000 will make it look nicer" just makes me think the guy needs rent money and time.


Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.


#14 ShadowFlar3   Members   -  Reputation: 1258

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 09:49 AM

I've been with indieDB since 2006 and honestly with what you've CURRENTLY got out there, not a chance unless I've under-evaluated the genre's appeal and supply-demand by a lot. But!

 

I can see you have a huge amount of content done but you just aren't really selling it. You should have maybe done some gameplay videos before you went for "feature complete alpha" to grow a better fanbase. But it's still a new project on the site and this is a perfect opportunity to test your marketing abilities. First focus on climbing indieDB popularity and see what works and what doesn't.

 

Son of Nor is one example of how to do it. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/stillalivestudios/son-of-nor-the-world-is-your-weapon

They just tackled the public from all angles, they did everything from indieDB to this site, Steam Greenlight, Kickstarter, facebook, Twitter... they had so much content fired all over the internet that nobody could miss it and once they got people interested they kept them tagged along by constant updates and video blog with in-game material, developer insight etc. I'm not saying that's what it takes but getting the public interested in your game enough to fund it even if you have a solid idea and good progress is hard work and you probably only get once real chance with the crowdfunding.

 

So get the trailer out there and start marketing the project. Update the indieDB site frequently (each update bumps the project back to top) and try to reflect your project status accurately because you are further than one could deduce from the screenshots alone. Currently the indieDB site is your only base on the net and you've got around 30 followers (now including me :) ) and if each of us were interested enough to chip in we'd have to donate quite large sums of money.

 

I think you should pay attention to establishing the "brand" of your game. Logos, fonts, colors, visual style. Maybe that'll come naturally as you complete the trailer.

 

When you get a growing fanbase and start to attract the masses you know you're on the right track. For indiegogo campaign It might be a good idea to dissect the $5,000 budget and really go over the costs to see if that's the right amount to make the game really happen. Prove people that your game is awesome, this is where you are, this where you want to be and this is what it takes to get there. After that it's just a matter of listing the right perks :)

 

I might be speaking just my personal opinion but even if you have a game that is almost playable I suggest you don't stress the fact that people are getting the game for their money or that they are buying the product. I feel like this only makes the audience more skeptical and critical. "Is he really going to finish it?" "What if he won't get all the money? Then I don't get the game and my money isn't returned" "Do I really want to play this game more than my favorite $20 game?" When they might just want to give you some money because they liked your project.

 

GL and I'll be watching your progress :)



#15 Darkmill   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:38 AM

I've been with indieDB since 2006 and honestly with what you've CURRENTLY got out there, not a chance unless I've under-evaluated the genre's appeal and supply-demand by a lot. But!

 

I can see you have a huge amount of content done but you just aren't really selling it. You should have maybe done some gameplay videos before you went for "feature complete alpha" to grow a better fanbase. But it's still a new project on the site and this is a perfect opportunity to test your marketing abilities. First focus on climbing indieDB popularity and see what works and what doesn't.

 

Son of Nor is one example of how to do it. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/stillalivestudios/son-of-nor-the-world-is-your-weapon

They just tackled the public from all angles, they did everything from indieDB to this site, Steam Greenlight, Kickstarter, facebook, Twitter... they had so much content fired all over the internet that nobody could miss it and once they got people interested they kept them tagged along by constant updates and video blog with in-game material, developer insight etc. I'm not saying that's what it takes but getting the public interested in your game enough to fund it even if you have a solid idea and good progress is hard work and you probably only get once real chance with the crowdfunding.

 

So get the trailer out there and start marketing the project. Update the indieDB site frequently (each update bumps the project back to top) and try to reflect your project status accurately because you are further than one could deduce from the screenshots alone. Currently the indieDB site is your only base on the net and you've got around 30 followers (now including me smile.png ) and if each of us were interested enough to chip in we'd have to donate quite large sums of money.

 

I think you should pay attention to establishing the "brand" of your game. Logos, fonts, colors, visual style. Maybe that'll come naturally as you complete the trailer.

 

When you get a growing fanbase and start to attract the masses you know you're on the right track. For indiegogo campaign It might be a good idea to dissect the $5,000 budget and really go over the costs to see if that's the right amount to make the game really happen. Prove people that your game is awesome, this is where you are, this where you want to be and this is what it takes to get there. After that it's just a matter of listing the right perks smile.png

 

I might be speaking just my personal opinion but even if you have a game that is almost playable I suggest you don't stress the fact that people are getting the game for their money or that they are buying the product. I feel like this only makes the audience more skeptical and critical. "Is he really going to finish it?" "What if he won't get all the money? Then I don't get the game and my money isn't returned" "Do I really want to play this game more than my favorite $20 game?" When they might just want to give you some money because they liked your project.

 

GL and I'll be watching your progress smile.png

Hey thanks for the throrough answer. You have a lot of valid points. 

 

My biggest worry (and the reason I mostly post screenshots of the landscape) is that there isn;t enough stuff to show. I mean it's a first person adventure game. There is not a lot of gameplay I can show. It's mostly story driven. I didn;t see gameplay of games like dear esther or gone home or lifeless planet before release so I assumed there's not really a lot to show. The greatness( or lack of) of these games hinge on the story and how it's presented. And until I get a least some voice acting going it's kind of dull for me to show the players lots of text and interactions that  lack context for them .

 

And everything regarding the gui is still using the default unity skin for buttons/menus etc that look very ugly and I'm afraid showing them now would deterr some players ( I always  was under the impression that showing something off too early hurts more than it helps).

 

At this point my plan is basically this :

 

1. Release a teaser trailer ( Currently editing it, so that should be ready soon ish).

2. Continue to update IndieDB with one screenshot per day.

3. Continue working on the game until it reaches a Beta status.

4. Start focusing on promoting the game through every media available(steam greenlight etc)/ go for the indiegogo campaign.

5. If indiegogo is successful , switch to unity pro and finish the game,while also investing time on promoting it.

6. If indiegogo is not successful  ,finish the game,while also investing time on promoting it.

7. After game is finished....promote it some more

8. Release it

 

 

That's the basic idea. I know there will be a lot of hurdles, but i'm afraid to start promoting it too soon, and would rather work on the actual game first. I'm not sure this is the right mentality , so let me know your opinion on it.



#16 Navezof   Members   -  Reputation: 1427

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 12:50 PM

I don't think an early campaign (meaning talking about the game before the beta)  fit well your type of game (adventure, story-driven)

What you want to show is not really the game. Everybody know what an adventure game is. You also can't show the story, as the player would probably prefer discovering it himself.

What you want to show is most likely the atmosphere of your game.

And screenshot often fail at rendering an entire atmosphere. I would focus on very short video (30 sec max) with few words like a movie teaser. Imagine a camera moving slowing over a lake, then the screen go blakc, and a sentence appears, then the camera move slowly over a forest, and then again, another sentence. Add to this a good music, nice audio effects, and you didn't have to show any gameplay, any completed level, just the stage you made for the teaser :D

To better illustrate there is an exemple of sentence which may fit in a teaser, from Flower of Evil : "When, after a decree of the supreme powers, The Poet is brought forth in this wearisome world, His mother terrified and full of blasphemies  Raises her clenched fist to God, who pities her".

The goal is to make the potential player wondering : "What is this?"

Even better, post each week a short video with a sentence each time apparently unrelated to the previous. But, when you assemble all the sentence from each video, all make sense.

Having some sort of enigma, and making the potential player already thinking about your game, before the game is released can be a nice way to get some attention. And when your game will be ready, by playing your game, player will be : "Ah, I understand now!" Or something like that.


But this "solution" can be more risky than other more classical.



#17 Darkmill   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 12:54 PM

I don't think an early campaign (meaning talking about the game before the beta)  fit well your type of game (adventure, story-driven)

What you want to show is not really the game. Everybody know what an adventure game is. You also can't show the story, as the player would probably prefer discovering it himself.

What you want to show is most likely the atmosphere of your game.

And screenshot often fail at rendering an entire atmosphere. I would focus on very short video (30 sec max) with few words like a movie teaser. Imagine a camera moving slowing over a lake, then the screen go blakc, and a sentence appears, then the camera move slowly over a forest, and then again, another sentence. Add to this a good music, nice audio effects, and you didn't have to show any gameplay, any completed level, just the stage you made for the teaser biggrin.png

To better illustrate there is an exemple of sentence which may fit in a teaser, from Flower of Evil : "When, after a decree of the supreme powers, The Poet is brought forth in this wearisome world, His mother terrified and full of blasphemies  Raises her clenched fist to God, who pities her".

The goal is to make the potential player wondering : "What is this?"

Even better, post each week a short video with a sentence each time apparently unrelated to the previous. But, when you assemble all the sentence from each video, all make sense.

Having some sort of enigma, and making the potential player already thinking about your game, before the game is released can be a nice way to get some attention. And when your game will be ready, by playing your game, player will be : "Ah, I understand now!" Or something like that.


But this "solution" can be more risky than other more classical.

 

I actually like that approach. I'll try to think of something interesting and see how it goes. Thanks for the tip!



#18 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1641

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 03:37 PM

This whole thread goes to show that another crucial member of the game project is the marketing person.  I'm the worst at it since I've got this "Hey, don't play it if you don't like it" attitude.


Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.


#19 ShadowFlar3   Members   -  Reputation: 1258

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 06:55 AM

Yeah, obviously your trailer is not going to be with explosions and lasers and doing running jumps. It's going to be about... well, what your game is about. Focusing on the story start with the conflict and bring in the diversifiers but don't reveal too much. Don't worry about the GUI or any other content you don't want to show yet, focus on what looks nice and delvers the atmosphere you're going for.

 

TBH I assumed you had a clear view of where to aim for having mentioned some great names like Dear Esther. I was there when it was released as HL2 mod and I can tell you they had nothing but couple images and some piano tracks there IIRC. It was truly a hidden gem and people were blown away having played it after all the countless unoriginal HL2 mods. The current trailer for the game is not a bad reference and source of inspiration, just don't feel bad if you can't go for the same visual perfection. Be confident, It was once no better than your project is now. :)



#20 Darkmill   Members   -  Reputation: 152

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 11:05 AM

Yeah, obviously your trailer is not going to be with explosions and lasers and doing running jumps. It's going to be about... well, what your game is about. Focusing on the story start with the conflict and bring in the diversifiers but don't reveal too much. Don't worry about the GUI or any other content you don't want to show yet, focus on what looks nice and delvers the atmosphere you're going for.

 

TBH I assumed you had a clear view of where to aim for having mentioned some great names like Dear Esther. I was there when it was released as HL2 mod and I can tell you they had nothing but couple images and some piano tracks there IIRC. It was truly a hidden gem and people were blown away having played it after all the countless unoriginal HL2 mods. The current trailer for the game is not a bad reference and source of inspiration, just don't feel bad if you can't go for the same visual perfection. Be confident, It was once no better than your project is now. smile.png

 

After making a first draft of the trailer and discussing it with a few game designer friends , I've realized that what i have now in the trailer is not appealing. It feels empty and rushed ( well i did rush it to get it out as fast as possible). The consensus is, while it looks nice for something made it a short timespan by me alone, that's not worth anything at all. So I need to go back , get the game in beta stage , where I can show more and then make a trailer that actually makes you want to play the game.

 

 So thanks for all the feedback. I'm gonna to back to work now and see what I can come up with in about 7-8 weeks from now. Hopefully it will be something that will get people talking and supporting!

 

Also for anyone interested here is the trailer(I'm not too proud of it)Even with adding a title screen and music I still don;t think it's any good  :   .


Edited by Darkmill, 29 July 2014 - 11:13 AM.





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