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#1 Xyexs   Members   -  Reputation: 124

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 02:58 PM

A few years ago i randomly felt like learning programming, I was 11 and googled where to start.

I got a random 5 part text based swedish guide for c++. It took me a while to learn but after that i had a very basic grasp of c++.

I was super hyped... i had made a text based rock papor scissors game! Ofcourse i didn't know how to export it from my IDE and i had failed a bit with the randomness but... i had made stuff appear on the screen.

I still didn't put much time into this, it was just something i did when i had time over.

 

So after that i didn't know  what to do... at the time i was a huge minecraft fan and my goal was modding minecraft, i had heard minecraft was made in java so i went learning it at thenewboston.com. A year had past and my english was decent so i could atleast understand most of what he said.After a year or so i eventually got through his basic/intermediate tutorials and made a cool 2d pong/snake game in swing. Still not putting that much time into the hobby.

 

At this point in time i still liked minecraft, and there was a mod for it that made computers/robots ingame that you could give scripts to in lua. It was fun and i made a script that got 35000 views on a forum... i was super proud until i realised there was a very major bug in the structure of the program that made it unusable... you would think that someone of the 35000 readers would tell me...

 

Wellwell, i still haven't solved that problem and my code was so unorganized i never will. After all that i started with unity after a few months break and found it awesome how fast you could make games with it.

 

I made a breakout game(following a tutorial), and then this random thing on a random afternoon where i had to much time (http://www.kongregate.com/games/theprodev/leaf-simulator-2015)

 

That leads me to today, unity is cool but in kind of feels like unoptimized cheating. 

I'm 14 now, next year i have the choice to learn basic programming in school (can't wait!). I wan't to make good games, and i've never spent that much time on a project... I really want to learn opengl.

I found this 3d tutorial, http://www.arcsynthesis.org/gltut/, and couldn't even setup the ide... i felt that was way beyond my scope (even though i learned a bit about vector math and the structure of programs there). For now i want to settle with 2d.

 

Any good tutorials for my skill level... or maybe another alternative?



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#2 kseh   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1992

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 03:30 PM

Since you said you're 14 and you're about to take your first programming class (and because I don't have fond memories of the early classes that were available to me), don't be surprised if you find your first programming class a bit of a disappointment. Maybe your school is awesome and current and has an excellent program to help young programmers but the truth is you've got a fair amount of experience under your belt right now that other people joining the class probably won't have and the class will be about getting them up to speed. And the crazy thing is that you'll need to pay attention too as there is always the possibility that something is covered that you haven't already learned. So don't sleep the entire class off.

35k views on a project is a lot but it doesn't necessarily mean 35k people tried your mod. And of the ones that had tried your mod, they all could have experienced different results and never seen the bug that you've found. Or they could be sufficiently unaware of what goes on behind the scenes to be unaware of the problem. Or they could just be completely apathetic or have low expectations. In any case, if it's something that bothers you then go fix the bug. It can be hard to go back to work on a project that you've already thought was completed but supporting your work is part of the job.

Efficient and organized code comes with experience and practice. So, identify what it is that you want to improve on, and work on projects specifically to learn those skills.



#3 Xyexs   Members   -  Reputation: 124

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 04:12 PM

Thank you for taking the time!
The programming course is something i had heard was easy for anyone, especially someone that knew something before.
What i am hoping for is being able to interact with a teacher and ask him questions about more advanced things that we dont learn in the course.
I heard he is a great teacher, and my hopes are up the roof! :D (i guess that could be a bad thing)

About the computercraft script... It was good for me, i learned how important version control and organizing / comments is.

Thank you again

#4 Xyexs   Members   -  Reputation: 124

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 04:14 PM

Double post...

#5 Xyexs   Members   -  Reputation: 124

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 04:16 PM

Triple post.... Überfail

#6 Gian-Reto   Members   -  Reputation: 733

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 02:58 AM

Don't bash too much on Unity.... true, its not the most optimized engine in the world, and it takes some expierience to really make decently optimized games in it.

 

But really, don't ditch it because "other engines are more 1337" or something like that. I did, and got burnt by the "uber-1337" enthusiast engine that was implementing all this DX11 shizzle at a time when even Unreal 3 did not.

 

Found out the dev just concentrated on looks and shiny features instead of performance...

 

 

Of course, using an Engine is pretty much useless if you really want to learn to code "to the metal". Then, even the Unreal 4 engine or other big commercial ones will not do.

 

And don't be too worried about past coding of yours being a total mess. Happened to every programmer at some stage, and even today I sometimes open old code and can't help but think "what the f*** was I thinking?" ;)

 

 

Also, don't expect any school to teach you anything about the really advanced subjects. Schools there to teach you the basics, which holds true even for universities and higher education.

There is a good reason why a lot of people seem to start giving out the advice to build up a portfolio of personal works even outside of the arts and design sector (where it its a must since like... forever).

 

Its not only for show. Setting yourself a task and trying to achieve it will help you build knowledge at a rapid pace. Depending on your learning type, you might find it even better for learning than school (was true for me... I only ever learned a subject when I had overcome a problem with it in a personal or school project).

 

So while I can understand how excited you are about the start of your programming classes... keep up working on your personal projects! You might find out they are more valuable to your learning than any programming class (especially entry level) can be.


Edited by Gian-Reto, 29 July 2014 - 03:09 AM.


#7 Xyexs   Members   -  Reputation: 124

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 03:37 AM

Since i feel i get good answers for anything here i'll keep asking questions.

Does c++ and OpenGL work good for 2d? Would that be to hard for me?
If not; any tutorials?

Right now i want to make small games and upload to sites like kongregate... There is no way to do that with C++? I guess i could go back to keeping my stuff for my self... But i get less feedback then.

#8 superman3275   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2011

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 08:07 AM

Since i feel i get good answers for anything here i'll keep asking questions.

Does c++ and OpenGL work good for 2d? Would that be to hard for me?
If not; any tutorials?

Right now i want to make small games and upload to sites like kongregate... There is no way to do that with C++? I guess i could go back to keeping my stuff for my self... But i get less feedback then.

You don't want to use OpenGL as your first library (or for 2D games, in that regard). You should learn a higher-level library, I recommend SFML.


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#9 Eck   Members   -  Reputation: 2114

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 09:02 AM

You might try C# and MonoGame (an open source port of XNA). I'm not sure how difficult it is to setup the IDE since I'm still messing with XNA. I hear that programming in MonoGame is extremely similar to XNA, so I can safely recommend it as a good choice for 2D games. The reason I recommend MonoGame instead of XNA is because XNA is no longer being actively supported by Microsoft whereas MonoGame has a pretty active community.

 

And count yourself lucky for getting started so early in life. Having a passion to learn and some smarts to back it up is a pretty rare combination. So many people have one or the other but not both. :) 

 

- Eck







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