Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

We're offering banner ads on our site from just $5!

1. Details HERE. 2. GDNet+ Subscriptions HERE. 3. Ad upload HERE.


Which topics (languages, engines and other things) are being taught in top game programming institutes to make someone industry ready?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
7 replies to this topic

#1 Rbsupercool   Members   -  Reputation: 133

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2014 - 06:33 AM

I'm currently a computer science student on my 5th semester, want to be a game programmer and get a job in a top AAA company. I know i'm far away from that , but i just want to develop myself as a good game developer, so i wanna know what are the things being taught in top institutes. I know c/c++, java. how should i progress. Currently i'm learning Unity. Should i learn directx, opengl next.Thanks a lot..



Sponsor:

#2 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1637

Like
5Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2014 - 08:30 AM

Is there such a thing as a "Top Game Programming Institute"?

 

I'd be more concerned with finding a university with a quality computer science program.  GAMESgamesGAMES sounds fun, but so does being a rock star or NBA player.  You still need fundamentals, so go to uni and focus on growing as a person and learning your craft.  Then use those abilities to get a job at a AAA studio.

 

Fact:  A Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from CMU will be more appealing to an employer than an online degree from Blah-Blahs Game School.

 


Should i learn directx, opengl next.Thanks a lot..

 

There are over 42 billion (yes, I counted) links, FAQs, and "Read this before posting" threads on this very site.  Use them.


Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.


#3 Gian-Reto   Members   -  Reputation: 1428

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2014 - 08:49 AM

I am far from the right guy to answer this question but with the CS Degree you seem to be working on and you obviously engaging in learning Game Dev related stuff in your free time you seem to be pretty much on track.

 

A lot of people will tell you to start building games/engines/game related systems, so you have something to show after finishing your degree.

 

How to do that -> see GoCatGo's comment.


Edited by Gian-Reto, 30 July 2014 - 08:50 AM.


#4 ferrous   Members   -  Reputation: 2075

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2014 - 04:32 PM

Is there such a thing as a "Top Game Programming Institute"?

 

 

DigiPen, maybe?  In which case, the answer would be C/C++, as that's their focus.  I think that goes for Full Sail as well.  But I'd give the same answer for "What languages do AAA developers use", as it's pretty much C++ all the time.  At least for consoles and PC, with maybe a bonus for knowing some scripting languages and/or C#.

 

EDIT: Open GL or DirectX, doesn't really matter, just make games.  AAA games have many programmers, graphics, AI, UI, gameplay, networking, etc.  Concentrate on an area you want to specialize in, make sure that portion of the game is great and or novel.


Edited by ferrous, 30 July 2014 - 04:35 PM.


#5 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1637

Like
2Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2014 - 05:10 PM


I think that goes for Full Sail as well.

 

I think we have very different ideas of what constitutes a top educational program.


Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.


#6 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22293

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2014 - 06:02 PM

It is the person, not the school, that makes the difference.

 

College and university graduates are entry level game developers.  

 

Even the "top educational program" graduates start out with an entry level job.  They may have some additional knowledge and skills that are useful in some circumstances and may be given a job requiring a year or two of experience, but really that is nothing. 

 

That is a 1-2 year acceleration off your 40+ year career.

 

Once you have a few years of experience under your belt you should be able to pick up any topic fairly quickly. Over your career you will be expected to re-invent yourself multiple times. You will be expected to learn about all kinds of new technologies and do it on your own time. If you don't, you will find yourself passed by or limited in growth as the next round of technology comes around.

 

 

Learn algorithms and data structures, since they are the core of programming. Learn about all forms of communication, as that has been a core growth topic for twenty years. Learn about any other topics that interest you, like data storage, graphics, tools, computer human interaction theory, compiler theory, computing theory, and whatever else makes you excited. Then keep learning.


Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.


#7 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10080

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2014 - 06:29 PM

Is there such a thing as a "Top Game Programming Institute"?


There is, but is that really what's best for everyone? No - location, cost, skills, passion - these things all vary per person.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#8 GoCatGo   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 1637

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 31 July 2014 - 01:54 PM

Yeah, a person can get out what they put in, but, call me an elitist, some places are just over-priced degree mills.  None of this is really on topic, so I'll leave it at that.


Edited by GoCatGo, 31 July 2014 - 01:55 PM.

Indie games are what indie movies were in the early 90s -- half-baked, poorly executed wastes of time that will quickly fall out of fashion.  Now go make Minecraft with wizards and watch the dozen or so remakes of Reservior Dogs.





Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS