Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


Very new, where should I start?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
5 replies to this topic

#1 cavendert   Members   -  Reputation: 155

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 31 July 2014 - 11:59 AM

Hey everyone. I'm about as new as new can be. I am teaching myself coding right now (ok with C++), but that's about the end of my experience. 

 

Should I jump into learning Python and review C++ every once in awhile?

 

What else should I start learning? Im really interested in this, but just don't know where to begin. 



Sponsor:

#2 Lactose!   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 3302

Like
5Likes
Like

Posted 31 July 2014 - 12:09 PM

You should start with the FAQ, if you haven't already.

 

Other than that it depends on what you want to do. Certain languages/frameworks/libraries might be better suited for certain things.



#3 cavendert   Members   -  Reputation: 155

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 31 July 2014 - 01:09 PM

You should start with the FAQ, if you haven't already.

 

Other than that it depends on what you want to do. Certain languages/frameworks/libraries might be better suited for certain things.

Just out of curiousity, what do you like to do? At the moment, I have a decent interest in programming. But, I'm  not even sure what else is all available. 



#4 shadowisadog   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2506

Like
3Likes
Like

Posted 31 July 2014 - 02:49 PM

I think the best advice I can give to someone just starting out is the following:

 

1. Understand that the field of game development and computer programming is HUGE. It is perfectly ok to not know everything at once and you shouldn't feel like you have to learn everything at once.

 

2. Start small. When I learn a new programming language I start with a small program and gradually increase the complexity. I might start off with hello world, make a guess the number game, program a text adventure, write hangman and nim before even starting with anything involving graphics.

 

3. Programming a game is programming. To learn to program a game you must learn the fundamentals of programming. The fundamentals transfer well between different languages so learning new languages should become easier with time.

 

4. A good software developer should know a wide variety of languages and technologies/techniques. They are your tools and you should pick the right tool for the job. A carpenter does not use only a hammer! However if you only have experience using a hammer then all jobs might seem like proper things to use a hammer for.

 

5. Failure is fine as long as you learn from it. Giving up should not be ok with you if you want to be successful.

 

6. Use the language that you feel most comfortable with using... Don't use a language just because it is what the industry uses... use it because you can be productive with it... only when you gain some experience then you can worry with what the industry uses!

 

Just my advice :).



#5 cavendert   Members   -  Reputation: 155

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 31 July 2014 - 03:27 PM

Fantastic Advice! I've been toying with both C++ and Python, so I will continue with those. As of this moment, I have a huge interest in programming. But, you never know. Thanks for the advice guys!



#6 shadowisadog   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2506

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 31 July 2014 - 04:47 PM

Your welcome :) .

 

Here are some other things I thought of:

 

1. One of the biggest hurdles I had to overcome when I started was the fact that there is no "best" language. There is no "best" design approach. Some techniques and designs are "better" (of course this is quite subjective, but in this case I will use it to mean more maintainable) than others, but you will find that everyone has a particular preference and style.

 

2. Use existing tools and technologies where possible. Lots of new people try to make their own engines and/or own tools from scratch. This can be a great learning exercise, but it will really limit your productivity if you attempt to code everything yourself. Using the work of others is how we are able to build bigger and better games and systems! Remember that for a lot of tools and engines have had many brilliant and experienced people working for many years to develop them.

 

3. College/University for computer science/software engineering is very valuable. You will learn a lot, but more importantly the people you meet and the things that you do will be very valuable to you later!

 

4. Learn every day. I am STILL learning new things every day and I have a degree in computer science and I have been working as a software engineer for a number of years. Never stop learning new things!






Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS