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Intersting Game Idea


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#1 madmanwithanaxe   Members   -  Reputation: 112

Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:09 AM

 I have had a good idea (which Is rare for me) of a game where you play as a "vigilante" who is a modern Street runner who believes he can make the world a better place so he decides to take out the small gun market so he starts to take out gangs and the player can choose to tackle as little or as many enemies he wants and after he knocks out the enemies he can either take their guns or disassemble or break their guns depending on what option he choses the player will get the choice to create themselves a new weapon for example if the player were to get 6 pistol barrels and a gas canister the player could create a air gun or something along that lines. Also I would like my game to be first person.

 

I have had no experience making a game and cannot code.unsure.png

 

I would like this to be a little indie project or possibly a large game and would fully enjoy you honest opinions.

 

Thank You for reading this.



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#2 Zaoshi Kaba   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4588

Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:21 AM

So what do you want? Learn to code? Or you're looking for a team?



#3 madmanwithanaxe   Members   -  Reputation: 112

Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:24 AM

I am looking for advice whether I should learn to code or assemble a team or if I should kickstart it or if I should scrap the project. And also what I should make it with I am planning on using the free unity to make a small version of this game and if it is popular assemble a team who will help it become a full proper game instead of being an indie game.


Edited by madmanwithanaxe, 10 August 2014 - 10:27 AM.


#4 madmanwithanaxe   Members   -  Reputation: 112

Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:33 AM

I have come up with a title

 

                                                                  The "Hero(ish)"



#5 Lactose!   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 3827

Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:47 AM

If you want to make games yourself, put that game idea away for a while and start smaller. A lot smaller. Pong complexity is what you'll be focusing on for quite a while.

See the FAQ for more details.

 

If you want to get a team to join you, you'll need to bring more to the table than just an idea. Be it art skills, programming, level design abilities, etc.

While it might seem a bit harsh, you would probably benefit from reading this as well.

 

Making games is difficult, and will require a lot of time. If you stick to it, you can achieve quite amazing things, either on your own or as a part of a team, but the likelyhood of you basically starting from nothing and pursuing a dream project with no prior experience AND finishing it are practically zero.



#6 Code Fox   Members   -  Reputation: 1809

Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:54 AM

Getting a "team" together with only an idea will not go very well ( this has been talked about many times before) .

You need to:

1: Have a detailed plan on what you want your game to do, and how it will be accomplished.

2: Figure out which game engine you will want to use - or if you want to build a game from scratch.

3: Figure out which language you will need to learn to create your game - you will have to learn to code.

4: Produce a prototype of your game to show off.

5: Attempt to recruit or hire folks .


Does Anyone Actually Read This ?
 


#7 Andy Gainey   Members   -  Reputation: 2104

Posted 10 August 2014 - 11:46 AM

You might have fun trying to turn your ideas into a board game, pen-and-paper RPG, or other table-top style game.  No coding necessary, obviously.  History, the past few decades especially, have proven that there is a huge possibility space with non-digital games.  It also gives you an excuse to play around with crafts, if that's something you find fun.

 

This sort of approach will teach and exercise game design skills, particularly the design of game mechanics.  This can definitely carry over into digital games as well.  (There are differences for sure, but a lot of similarities too, which I worry often go unrecognized!)  Plus, if you have a playable and fun physical game that can be demonstrated, it can be much easier to get a team together, because there's already proof that the core mechanics translate into an enjoyable experience, and everyone can quickly get a tangible sense of what the vision for the game is.



"We should have a great fewer disputes in the world if words were taken for what they are, the signs of our ideas only, and not for things themselves." - John Locke

#8 madmanwithanaxe   Members   -  Reputation: 112

Posted 11 August 2014 - 03:42 AM

I am planning on using the free version of unity to create a small version of my idea and plan to kickstart it and assemble a team to create a bigger version. 



#9 Gian-Reto   Members   -  Reputation: 1816

Posted 11 August 2014 - 04:45 AM

I am planning on using the free version of unity to create a small version of my idea and plan to kickstart it and assemble a team to create a bigger version. 

 

This is a fine and good idea, and shows you at least took part of the advices given above serious:

a) don't try to assemble a team without prior expierience and with nothing to show / no skill to contribute

b) start smaller

 

 

Just to make sure you also got the other advices:

c) you will need A LOT of time to even create the smaller version, especially if you have no prior expiereince with making games (and just to make really sure, we are talking years here, depending on the amount of time you can allocate to this project of course)

d) Your idea alone is not worth a penny. Simple, but harsh truth. Your execution of the idea might be worth a lot. Always remember that when you prepare for a Kickstarter. People most probably are not interested in your idea... they want to see how this idea translates to an actual game.

 

The last part might need some additional advice: With Kickstarter, you are selling your product to the Gamer, you are not pitching your idea to a publisher. So you will have to make your game idea not only come through from the prototype (which also holds true for pitching), you also need to make it look as good as you can.

 

Read some Kickstarter Postmortems for Informations on what you should take into account when preparing your campaign.


Edited by Gian-Reto, 11 August 2014 - 04:46 AM.


#10 madmanwithanaxe   Members   -  Reputation: 112

Posted 11 August 2014 - 07:57 AM

Thank you Gian-Reto I appreciate the honesty and am planning to create a very basic combat ands physics game demo to show off the potential.



#11 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10160

Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:33 AM

I am looking for advice whether I should learn to code or assemble a team or if I should kickstart it or if I should scrap the project.


This question doesn't fit in For Beginners (a technical forum), but it's not quite a Production question or a Business question either. Moving it to The Lounge.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#12 Orymus3   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 10631

Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:39 AM

You have a game mechanic idea, not a game idea.

Flesh out the game design into a full fledged game in a coherent document.

It doesn't need to list everything, but people that read it should have the same vision as you do when they're done reading.

 

This is the first step to a game concept (even before actually starting to code).



#13 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10160

Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:40 AM

I am looking for advice whether I should
a. learn to code or
b. assemble a team or if I should
c. kickstart it or if I should
d. scrap the project.


Well, you can't do B or C because you're not ready and, well, those won't work out given that you had to ask this question. You shouldn't do D, but you have to understand that it's not a "project" - it's just a game idea that isn't fully formed until it's written down fully, and you also know how it'll earn money. So I struck off B and C and D. Does that leave A as the only remaining option? No, it doesn't - there are also E and F and G (blanks that you can fill yourself). Do you want to learn to program? If so, do. If not, don't. There are other ways you can go.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#14 Sugavanas   Members   -  Reputation: 200

Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:53 AM

let me tell you something, the best way to do it, is you be the main one doing all the work. try to pay others to do some work and only join with ppl who you know and willing to work.

 

I remember getting together a team which didn't even work. we had good communication system. All roles filled up with people but no one wanted to work. 



#15 d000hg   Members   -  Reputation: 828

Posted 11 August 2014 - 09:15 AM

Getting a "team" together with only an idea will not go very well ( this has been talked about many times before) .

You need to:

1: Have a detailed plan on what you want your game to do, and how it will be accomplished.

2: Figure out which game engine you will want to use - or if you want to build a game from scratch.

3: Figure out which language you will need to learn to create your game - you will have to learn to code.

4: Produce a prototype of your game to show off.

5: Attempt to recruit or hire folks .

 

You do not need to be able to code, or do art, etc. But you do need a decent vision of the game and a way to communicate this very well to other people - whether through a game design document, storyboards, being an excellent communicator, etc.

 

But if you are just designing the game, you will realistically need to find funding. If you put together a really polished design you might get people interested in joining for fun, I guess.



#16 Code Fox   Members   -  Reputation: 1809

Posted 11 August 2014 - 10:22 AM

Thank you Gian-Reto I appreciate the honesty and am planning to create a very basic combat ands physics game demo to show off the potential.

How about working on your C# skills first ?

 Tell me:

Can you make a letter "fall" down a simulated grid in your C# debugger output ?

Can you make a letter walk and jump across a simulated grid in your C# debugger output ?

 

 If your answer is "no", you are not even close to ready to attempt ""basic combat ands physics"" .


Does Anyone Actually Read This ?
 


#17 Gian-Reto   Members   -  Reputation: 1816

Posted 12 August 2014 - 10:22 AM

let me tell you something, the best way to do it, is you be the main one doing all the work. try to pay others to do some work and only join with ppl who you know and willing to work.

 

I remember getting together a team which didn't even work. we had good communication system. All roles filled up with people but no one wanted to work. 

 

Yep, that was my expierience too when I tried it 2 years ago.

 

In the end, from 7 people in the Team one other besides me did any real work, and he was quite good at it. Of course he lost interest quickly as I was to drowned in doing everything else on my own to really keep giving him interesting tasks.

 

So yeah, its hard finding guys that are not only interested, but also skilled and ready to work for free, and its even harder managing the team afterwards.



#18 maxcloud17   Members   -  Reputation: 107

Posted 13 August 2014 - 01:24 AM


work for free
.. The topic started by madman is nice, however I am also looking for similar kind of idea... and looking for free artists and developer, 1-1 can do .. I work in a game testing company as a qa manager, so I know what, why and how but don't know if it is possible to engage people at no cost?

GameCloud is an ISO 9001-2008 TUV Austria certified game testing company providing full game testing services for various platforms and devices


#19 Navezof   Members   -  Reputation: 1266

Posted 13 August 2014 - 06:51 AM


engage people at no cost?


Engaging people at no cost is possible. But it is illegal in most country, it's called slavery :D

More seriously, I'm pretty sure people won't work for free. If you can't give them money, then you'll have to give them something else in return : experience, fame, future perspective, something to put in a portofolio.

In any case you'll have to give them really good reason to convince them to work for your project, and even better reason to stay with you until the end.

#20 slayemin   Members   -  Reputation: 2912

Posted 15 August 2014 - 01:24 PM

 


work for free
.. The topic started by madman is nice, however I am also looking for similar kind of idea... and looking for free artists and developer, 1-1 can do .. I work in a game testing company as a qa manager, so I know what, why and how but don't know if it is possible to engage people at no cost?

 

Yes, it's possible to recruit people for free. However, you get what you pay for. Expect your recruited people to be very inexperienced and very flakey. They are as committed as you are, and if you're not committed enough to pay people, they aren't committed enough to stick around and invest their time and energy into your project. They'll most likely do your project for about a week, get bored, and abandon it. 99.999% impossible to ship a game with these circumstances. So I say, get serious or go home.


Eric Nevala

Indie Developer | Dev blog





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