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Solo Project - Quality Expected?


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#1 Valoon   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 485

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 10:50 AM

Hi,

 

I am currently programming a game using Unity and I do everything on my own except some free assets.

Meaning I did a "lot" of animations for example, which I kinda suck at.

 

My point here is, when I show this to a company, will they be like : "this guy can't do animation to save his life so it's a -" knowing that I don't want to do animations and I am really interested mostly in sounds (and I like programming too but I don't have any degree or anything for this).

 

In a nutshell, in a "full" game or at least full level will they judge me only on sounds if I apply for sounds ? Or do I have some risks to get downgraded because of the rest. (It's not god awful don't get me wrong but it's not really pro quality).

For sounds I got access thanks to the people on Wwise to a full free licence for my game so I should be more than ok for sounds.

 

I want to do this project on my own because so far every team I had failed at some point, and everyone wants to do some MMO or RPG which are a bit unrealistic in my opinion. I think I have not find the right people yet.

 

Maybe after I'll do a team thing.


Edited by Valoon, 10 August 2014 - 10:51 AM.


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#2 Navyman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4053

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 02:31 PM

It would depend on how you present the game to people.


Developer with a bit of Kickstarter and business experience.

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#3 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10158

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 04:28 PM

And it would depend on what role you're applying for. If you're applying for a programming position, nobody cares what your graphics look like or what your audio sounds like.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#4 Orymus3   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 10629

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:43 AM

I don't know about recruiters per se, but whenever I have a candidate in an interview that went the extra mile to put together a full interactive demo just to showcase his actual skillset (and he didn't have a team but didn't stop at that), I will expect he goes the extra mile when he has a job too, so that's a +1 for me right there.

 

Some of the best folks I've met in the industry are men of many talents. One of them namely attended the 'Challenge Pixel' competition on his own (if you are unfamiliar with that game jam, its premice is essentially to build a team and make a game in 48hours, so its no small feat for a one-man-army to deliver anything on-theme).

 

I say go with it, but be clear about the job you're applying for, or be clear about what skills you intend on pursuing.

Some studios sometimes hire 'jacks-of-all-trades' to handle prototypes and whatnot, so they can have one guy that does a bit of everything to put a prototype together before kicking in production.

 

Best of luck.



#5 Valoon   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 485

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 04:51 PM

It would depend on how you present the game to people.

 

Well I would basically send then a playable thing + a paper with everything I did and why I did it with my resume/cv. If I do it by mail which is most of the time I would maybe put the thing to download on my website and put the explanations on my website + mention it on my CV/resume or/and cover letter.

 

If it's to people overall, I would call it a solo game project. It's in first person and it's an infiltration type game, but I don't give any gun, only a knife and some smoke/flash nades + a cloack suit. So you have no choice but to be sneaky to win the level.

 

 

And it would depend on what role you're applying for. If you're applying for a programming position, nobody cares what your graphics look like or what your audio sounds like.

 

I would be applying for sounds. But I don't reject the possibility of applying if someone is looking for a Unity Programmer. I have seen some of those.

 

 

I don't know about recruiters per se, but whenever I have a candidate in an interview that went the extra mile to put together a full interactive demo just to showcase his actual skillset (and he didn't have a team but didn't stop at that), I will expect he goes the extra mile when he has a job too, so that's a +1 for me right there.

 

Some of the best folks I've met in the industry are men of many talents. One of them namely attended the 'Challenge Pixel' competition on his own (if you are unfamiliar with that game jam, its premice is essentially to build a team and make a game in 48hours, so its no small feat for a one-man-army to deliver anything on-theme).

 

I say go with it, but be clear about the job you're applying for, or be clear about what skills you intend on pursuing.

Some studios sometimes hire 'jacks-of-all-trades' to handle prototypes and whatnot, so they can have one guy that does a bit of everything to put a prototype together before kicking in production.

 

Best of luck.

 

Thank you for the advices. Yes I do plan on pursuing this, I have basically finished everything the main character can do, so now really the next big thing I need to do is the AI of the bad guys and I should be almost good to go when it comes to the programming part.






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