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What's the industry like?


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#21 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 21155

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 07:03 PM

Programmers are always the highest in demand, There's usually anywhere around 4-10 programmers per designer and maybe 1-3 artists.

That actually depends on the project.

I've worked on projects where programmers outnumbered the artists, on projects where the artists were roughly equal in number to programmers, and I've been on projects where the art folks outnumbered programmers by about 4:1. And as typical, design and production are much less: each designer can often support ten or more other developers, producers often twenty or thirty.


One big reason for the discrepancy is the stage of the project. If the code base is immature and the engine is being heavily modified then there will be a larger ratio of programmers. When technology is stable, tools are mature, and everything is data driven, the need for programmers is small relative to the need for data content.

Another big reason is that different games have different needs. A hobby game may be all about a specific mechanic and rely on minimal art. An new engine for a moderate sized game will need a lot of programming to get all the parts in place. A blockbuster AAA title usually builds off of existing tools but needs an enormous pile of content. A long-running MMO can get along with nothing but content for quite some time.

Every project is different.
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#22 DerekL   Members   -  Reputation: 220

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Posted 15 August 2014 - 12:23 PM

 

 

That's some serious bad luck you've got there?

Well 2 off the layoffs were at the same company got rehired 4 months later the first time, unless you get full time at a big company its expected.



#23 MRom   Members   -  Reputation: 143

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 12:07 PM

Again, thanks for the input.

 

I've basically decided that I'll maybe get into this as a hobby and see where it takes me. I've spent today downloading all sorts of software and programs to get my feet wet and see where it takes me. 

 

Seems to me that the first place I should start is to learn a coding language. 

I've been going through some of the links provided to me by you fine gents and it seems to me that I should start off with 'C' and move into 'C++' when I've a decent foundation - does this sound about right? Am I off the mark here or is there somewhere else I should be focusing my attention.

 

I've also downloaded:

 

Microsoft Visual Studio

Maya

3DS Max Design

Unity 3D

 

Keep in mind, with my background in architecture, I'm vaguely familiar with 3DS Max but know AutoCAD and Revit intimately. Can I safely assume that AutoCAD and Revit aren't used much or at all in the industry for anything like level design?

 

Does my approach seem to be the best way at getting into this?

 

Again, thanks so much for all of the input!



#24 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9864

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 06:15 PM

I've also downloaded:
 
Microsoft Visual Studio
Maya
3DS Max Design
Unity 3D
 
...Does my approach seem to be the best way at getting into this?


This approach is going to overload your brain and overwhelm your senses. Start with one tool, and after you have gotten what you want to get out of it, THEN try one of the others.
-- Tom Sloper
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#25 MRom   Members   -  Reputation: 143

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 09:05 AM

 

I've also downloaded:
 
Microsoft Visual Studio
Maya
3DS Max Design
Unity 3D
 
...Does my approach seem to be the best way at getting into this?


This approach is going to overload your brain and overwhelm your senses. Start with one tool, and after you have gotten what you want to get out of it, THEN try one of the others.

 

Deffinetly. 

 

I wasn't going to try to simultaneously learn them all. Just figured I'd like to atleast have at my disposal all tools for the trade.

 

I was going to focus on learning a programming language fist and start off with 'C' then go into 'C++'.

Generally with this kind of stuff I tend to pick it up quick. 



#26 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 21155

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 10:01 AM


I was going to focus on learning a programming language fist and start off with 'C' then go into 'C++'.

Don't.

 

Learn C if you want to learn C, learn C++ if you want to learn C++.

 

In human languages you probably wouldn't say "I would like to learn Spanish and French, so I'll begin by learning Latin since they both grew from it", or "As preparation to learning Norwegian I'll first learn Old Norse." The same with programming language, if you want to learn a language then learn that language.


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#27 MRom   Members   -  Reputation: 143

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 01:35 PM

 


I was going to focus on learning a programming language fist and start off with 'C' then go into 'C++'.

Don't.

 

Learn C if you want to learn C, learn C++ if you want to learn C++.

 

In human languages you probably wouldn't say "I would like to learn Spanish and French, so I'll begin by learning Latin since they both grew from it", or "As preparation to learning Norwegian I'll first learn Old Norse." The same with programming language, if you want to learn a language then learn that language.

 

 

Interesting.

 

I'll do that then. I've read that C++ isn't for beginners and that beginners should start out with 'C'..

I'll start tonight, do a few tutorials and see where it takes me.

 

Again, thanks for the input.



#28 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 21155

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 02:44 PM

I agree that c++ has a rather harsh learning curve compared to some other languages. But I disagree that c should be the precursor language, the learning curve for modern c is also rather steep. Instead if you just want to learn how to program use something like python or C# that has a more shallow curve if you would rather learn the concepts of programming rather than diving in head first to the systems-development level.


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#29 MRom   Members   -  Reputation: 143

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 07:51 AM

I agree that c++ has a rather harsh learning curve compared to some other languages. But I disagree that c should be the precursor language, the learning curve for modern c is also rather steep. Instead if you just want to learn how to program use something like python or C# that has a more shallow curve if you would rather learn the concepts of programming rather than diving in head first to the systems-development level.

I tend to be very logic oriented and pick up programs/software pretty fast. I've started some tutorials via http://www.learncpp.com/ and am enjoying it.

Generally for me I'd rather dive in head first and learn the harder language right off the bat as long as it's the most commonly used in the industry, rather than fiddle around with the subsidiary ones just because they're easier.

I understand that each language has it's weakness. I'll not be ignorant enough to pretend I know more than that; but, is C++ not the standard? From what I've read I keep seeing that it's the most commonly used.



#30 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 21155

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 11:37 AM


From what I've read I keep seeing that it's the most commonly used.

For console systems, yes, C++ is the primary language. It is one of many languages used.

 

For cross-platform engines, yes, c++ is the primary language. It is one of many languages used.

 

For most web games, for most game scripts, for a large number of mobile games, no, c++ is not the primary language.

 

Even if your goal is to develop web games in flash or html5+javascript or Java or python, you should still invest the time to be at least familiar in passing with C++. All professional programmers should be somewhat familiar with many different languages, and make it a point to learn languages and technologies regularly, even if it isn't directly related to your job duties.

 

You never know when a sudden transition will be necessary and those skills will be useful. If your only skill is a knowledge of non-current C++ you probably won't be employable in the long term. Developers need to always grow and develop their skills, just like doctors must continuously re-learn medicine as advancements are made, lawyers must continuously re-learn the law as laws are passed and rulings are made, and auto mechanics need to continuously re-learn how vehicle technologies change over time. Programmers need to constantly evolve to new skills, not just Ye Goode Olde C++.

 

For example, while I use C++ for much stuff, I use C#, Java, SQL, HTML, JavaScript, PHP, Python, and many scripting languages on a daily basis. I regularly or somewhat infrequently use about 15 different languages. Just because C++ is the core language of the engine does not mean it is the only language used.


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#31 MRom   Members   -  Reputation: 143

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 12:13 PM


For most web games, for most game scripts, for a large number of mobile games, no, c++ is not the primary language.

 

Out of curiosity, what would you say is most common or appropriate language for these applications?



#32 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 21155

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 06:33 PM

For most web games, for most game scripts, for a large number of mobile games, no, c++ is not the primary language.

 
Out of curiosity, what would you say is most common or appropriate language for these applications?
I mentioned several.

Flash, html+jJavaScript, and Java are all quite popular for web-based games. For mobile, although some C++ bindings are commonly used the native languages for Apple and Android are Objective C (which is a sibling to C++ also a sibling to modern C) and Java respectively.
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