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unity monthly subscription question?


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#1 meisterwerk   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 12:37 PM

I cant afford the pro version but my 3d game will be for mobile and I think at some point I will have to get the mobile versions. And since I cant afford 4.5k, I will have to get monthly versions at $225/mo. But to make the most of it and to not go broke, I was thinking of doing the following.

 

1. Start building game on free version.

2. Get pro 30-day trial and build some more.

3. Buy the pro and mobile versions for $225/month for two months and deploy to mobile.

4. If the game does well, buy full versions at 4.5k. If it doesnt, stop the monthly payment and downgrade to free version and back to the drawing board.

 

Is this possible? Can I cancel the monthly versions once the game has been deployed and doesnt do well and go back to the free version.


Edited by meisterwerk, 30 August 2014 - 12:40 PM.


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#2 djtesh   Members   -  Reputation: 379

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 01:20 PM

Sorry but the Unity3D subscription membership is for a minimum of 12 months.



#3 meisterwerk   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 01:35 PM

damn it! thanks. And I take it that the 4.5k full version can be used for life without being renewed annually?


Edited by meisterwerk, 30 August 2014 - 01:36 PM.


#4 SyncViews   Members   -  Reputation: 465

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 01:43 PM

I have really not looked at Unity much, but the questions that come to my mind are:

 

  1. Can the free version be used for commercial purposes?
  2. If not 1., can existing unreleased closed source code be legally transferred to the commercial pro-version later?
  3. Is there a free version for Android and iOS?
  4. How much effort is needed to port between platforms? I know the "native" platform languages and API's are different, but I understand Unity abstracts all of that nearly entirely.
  5. Assuming 4. is somewhat less than "you really need to be working on all platforms from the very begining", why can you not just develop on Windows on the Free or Pro version until pretty late in development (you have a mobile like OS in Windows 8 if you need that), then get the extra mobile licenses later?
  6. can you not pick either iOS or Android, and only if you have a successful project consider porting to the other?
  7. If either 1. or 2., is there actually any feature in the Pro version you really need thats worth that investment?
  8. If 7. and 3., why would you ever need to get the pro version?

 

It certainly seems to me like you should be able to proceed by paying nothing now, later maybe getting just the core pro version, sometime later getting one mobile addon, and only getting the second mobile addon after you start having some income.


Edited by SyncViews, 30 August 2014 - 01:45 PM.


#5 meisterwerk   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 01:54 PM

thx mate. The pro version is the real game engine. The free version can only be used to create very basic games. My game is going to be somewhat complex and 3D. I guess since 12 months is the min subscription period, I will have to find a way and juggle things around. Sure I always intended to get on one mobile platform first and then the other after a month but not longer cos i wanted the game to be available on both platforms cos many games dont do well if they are not available on say android. Its the whole marketing, publicity thing, cos when people review a game on say youtube, things like these can make your game fail pretty fast.  I was hoping unity offered a royalty option like unreal's 5% on gross income, and I would even pay them 10% of future earnings. But said to say indie one-man devs like myself are out of luck unless they have a few ks lying around. 

 

Unreal I am not familiar with much but even if I was, their forums are filled with complaints from mobile devs that its not ready for mobile yet. Their showcase game is a flappy bird clone. My game is comple and I have invested a lot of time into making my 3d models, texturing then, on animating them, etc and I was hoping for an engine that would make my life easier and not more complicated. I dont want to be sitting there dealing with basic things that should work on mobile and doesnt , when I should be spending that time making the game a beautiful experience. People on their forums have been saying that even after fully optimizing the game, something keeps breaking. Doesnt give one much confidence. I settled on unreal yesterday after asking people for advise here but seems its not made for mobile yet. Even the admins keep saying that in a few months time it should be competitive for mobile but atm its not going to do it for me it seems.


Edited by meisterwerk, 30 August 2014 - 02:01 PM.


#6 SyncViews   Members   -  Reputation: 465

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 02:04 PM

Well the question was more could you get to the working prototype stage on the free or only core pro versions. Since at that point you should have a pretty good idea if its worth proceeding, and possibly go out looking for more help/investment to turn it into a finished product. I see the free version is for example missing a bunch of graphics stuff, but for a prototype to see if the concept is fun or not you don't need AAA graphics, and even if you had the pro version, at that point may not have made the investment in art assets etc. to fully take advantage? I certainly cant see anything listed that suggests a good deal of 3D stuff requires pro.



#7 meisterwerk   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 02:11 PM

I understand where you are coming from but I guess i was hoping for a better payment option from unity (like unreal). For example, even if you know the game is good after prototyping, you may not get the support from other sources. I am sure most would not have supported flappy bird. I just want to make my game without having 4k-5k and get it out there so people can decide whether its good or not (and pay unity their share). Every indie artist and dev needs that freedom. 

 

I guess i will have to sit down and find a way out.


Edited by meisterwerk, 30 August 2014 - 02:12 PM.


#8 SyncViews   Members   -  Reputation: 465

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 02:18 PM

Well to go beyond suggesting you work with cheaper licenses or use a different product, the only way you have any chance of getting a cheaper license deal containing the things you want from Unity is to talk to Unity sales and try and strike a deal (such as a revenue share, or a deposit+loan scheme, etc.).


Edited by SyncViews, 30 August 2014 - 02:18 PM.


#9 meisterwerk   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 02:22 PM

Well to go beyond suggesting you work with cheaper licenses or use a different product, the only way you have any chance of getting a cheaper license deal containing the things you want from Unity is to talk to Unity sales and try and strike a deal (such as a revenue share, or a deposit+loan scheme, etc.).

yeah i have emailed them this morning. Hoping they agree to a reduced monthly fee of around $50/month + 10% profit share. Hope they accept it. fingers crossed.


Edited by meisterwerk, 30 August 2014 - 02:26 PM.


#10 LancerSolurus   Members   -  Reputation: 617

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 02:24 PM

You could try out Torque 3D, it's now open source, the main downside is limited mobile support.


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#11 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6323

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 03:45 PM

I have really not looked at Unity much, but the questions that come to my mind are:

  • Can the free version be used for commercial purposes?
  • If not 1., can existing unreleased closed source code be legally transferred to the commercial pro-version later?
  • Is there a free version for Android and iOS?
  • How much effort is needed to port between platforms? I know the "native" platform languages and API's are different, but I understand Unity abstracts all of that nearly entirely.
  • Assuming 4. is somewhat less than "you really need to be working on all platforms from the very begining", why can you not just develop on Windows on the Free or Pro version until pretty late in development (you have a mobile like OS in Windows 8 if you need that), then get the extra mobile licenses later?
  • can you not pick either iOS or Android, and only if you have a successful project consider porting to the other?
  • If either 1. or 2., is there actually any feature in the Pro version you really need thats worth that investment?
  • If 7. and 3., why would you ever need to get the pro version?
It certainly seems to me like you should be able to proceed by paying nothing now, later maybe getting just the core pro version, sometime later getting one mobile addon, and only getting the second mobile addon after you start having some income.


1) Yes you can use it commercially, there is however a limit on your annual turnover (If you had a turnover above $100k the previous fiscal year you're not allowed to use the free version)

2) Yes you can transfer your code and work to the pro version whenever you want.

3) Yes, Android, iOS and Windows phone support is included in the free version

4) It depends, for a simple game there is not much effort at all required (As unity takes care of it and it is unlikely that you'll run into hardware limitations), If you need to use platform specific functionality or adapt your user interface / controls / etc to the platform there will be a bit of work required though and for more advanced mobile projects you will have to test things properly on a wide variety of hardware.

5) You could do that, Windows phone(and blackberry) support is included in the normal free and pro licenses (iOS and Android is only included in the free version, they cost extra in the pro version), you won't be able to test your game on iOS and Android without buying the extra licenses though so if you plan on releasing on both iOS and Android you will save time(and thus money if you are paying professionals to work for you) by getting both licenses from the start.

6) That is an option.

7) There are a whole bunch of features such as dynamic soft shadows, hdr, 3d textures, render-to-texture(required for a huge number of advanced shader effects), IK-rigs and productivity boosting functionality (scriptable asset pipeline, profiling tools, etc) that are cut out from the free version, so if you: A) need some of the cut features to make your game or B) value your own or your employees productivity (Which you would do if you're a professional as time = money) then you should get pro licenses.

8) Even if you don't need or want any of the pro-only features the free version can't be used by any business which had a annual turnover of more than $100k the previous fiscal year (Which basically means that it can only be used by start-ups, hobbyists and some really small and not very profitable companies).

Edited by SimonForsman, 30 August 2014 - 03:51 PM.

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#12 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22783

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 11:19 PM

Repeating what was answered in your other, similar question elsewhere on the site:

 

You do not need to buy either one now. Pay them $0 until you need to buy the license.

 

Many hobby developers are able to release a large number of games before hitting their price requirements. The game engines are packed with features, and many people have successfully leveraged the engines to create and release successful games. Just download them both, try them both out, and make games with whichever you prefer, or even make games with both of them. 

 

If you do happen to become successful, raking in $50,000 or $100,000 in one calendar year (depending on the platform), then you will need to spend a relatively small percentage of that money to buy a license. I figure if you used their tools to rake in a hundred thousand bucks, more than enough to replace your day job, giving a thousand to the engine creator is not a burden.


Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.


#13 Gian-Reto   Members   -  Reputation: 1821

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 04:47 AM

Really, meisterwerk, download Unity free and test it out yourself. There is NO POINT in delving this deep into questions that might be no concern really before you even tried out any of the engines you currently think about.

 

Ideally also download Unreal 4 and give both engines a short test run. See which you like better. Find out what features you really need. THEN start to worry about licencinsing needs and stuff like that.

 

 

If you don't have the time to invest some hours into playing around with both engines, you will not have the time to develop a game.

See it as an opportunity to start your learning process of how to build your game.

 

 

Also, I hope you are aware of the following:

 

For iOS development, you WILL need a Mac and AFAIK Xcode. There might be hacks to get around these requirements, but they are not sanctioned by Apple and you might get into trouble for it.

 

IDK if you can develop for Android on a Mac (most probably you can). So this will be a non-issue for you as a mac user, but might be an issue if you are a PC user. Then you will have to invest about 500$ bucks anyway for a small Mac machine.

(lets not talk about the test iOS and Android devices. If you take testing on mobile devices (especially Android) serious, you need quite some cash just for the hardware, which will dwarf any engine license cost... but again, you can get around that by... well... letting the users test it for you :) ).


Edited by Gian-Reto, 01 September 2014 - 04:55 AM.





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