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Is Unity 3d right for a horror game?


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#1 HassaanAtif   Members   -  Reputation: 128

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 09:17 AM

Hey Guys, So I've been using unity for a couple months and getting familiar with it . And now i wanna create a horror game something like Silent Hill.



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#2 HassaanAtif   Members   -  Reputation: 128

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 09:21 AM

Hey guys sorry i accidentally pressed enter . So i wanted to ask is Unity 3d right for a horror game. And also please suggest me a good 3d modelling tool and tool for creating audio for my game. 



#3 rip-off   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8516

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 09:49 AM

If you edit your post, and "Use Full Editor", you should be able to change the title (though I've already improved it). While I cannot talk about modelling or audio tools, I'm not aware of any reason why Unity would not be suitable for making horror games. You might get an idea of what people have already done by Googling (though what people have done is not always indicative of the possibilities).



#4 Gian-Reto   Members   -  Reputation: 1318

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 10:00 AM

Hey guys sorry i accidentally pressed enter . So i wanted to ask is Unity 3d right for a horror game. And also please suggest me a good 3d modelling tool and tool for creating audio for my game. 

 

Yes?

 

 

I mean, if you could give more specific details about why you think it might not be suitable, what the requirements for YOUR horror game exactly are (its a pretty broad category going from FPSes to Text adventures), people could give you more specific answers to you questions.

 

 

Generally, the answer is yes - Unity can do pretty much everything you want it to - though depending on your specific requirements there might be caveats to this answer. So better get more specific.

 

 

For 3D modelling, start with Blender. its a complete 3D Package similars to 3Ds Max or Maya, just opensourse and completly free. Yes the learning curve is steep... but its one of the best free 3D tools you will find!

 

For audio, you can use tools like Audiocity to cut and compose audiotracks and -effects. Of course you need to either record your own loops and effects, or get them from somewhere else. If you are looking for free resources, someone else will need to guide you.

 

If you are ready to spend something, on the audio side, the MAGIX Music Maker is pretty good, both for composing effects and audio tracks from loops. They even have their own store where you get tousands of loops for reasonable prices (though, if you buy all of them, the costs adds up of course).

On the 3D Modelling side I really love 3D Coat, and MoI. Both about 300 bucks per license, but pretty good for their respective areas of competence, and with intuitive interfaces (3D Coat for Sculpting (in voxels, yay!) and the high-poly to low poly retopo, MoI for NURBS modelling for hardsurface objects).

If you also want to do texturing, 3D Coat will have a awesome 3D Paint functionality (just as blender has, altough I never really used this), but you should also check out the Quixel Suite and the Substance Designer... both great tools for texturing stuff with complete materials (containing diffuse, normal and gloss channels together, not just one of them), both of them specially designed for a physically based pipeline.


Edited by Gian-Reto, 02 September 2014 - 05:13 AM.


#5 HassaanAtif   Members   -  Reputation: 128

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 12:05 PM

I mean, if you could give more specific details about why you think it might not be suitable, what the requirements for YOUR horror game exactly are (its a pretty broad category going from FPSes to Text adventures), people could give you more specific answers to you questions.

 

Generally, the answer is yes - Unity can do pretty much everything you want it to - though depending on your specific requirements there might be caveats to this answer. So better get more specific.

[...]

 

Woah dude!! thank you very much!! You've completely answered my question!! Actually most of the people were saying that its not suitable for a horror game. So i was getting confused. Anyways thanks again!! 



#6 Gian-Reto   Members   -  Reputation: 1318

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 12:13 AM

 

[...] Actually most of the people were saying that its not suitable for a horror game. So i was getting confused. Anyways thanks again!! 

 

 

Okay, did this people give you a reason WHY they think its not suitable? I know a lot of people have a strong opinion about engines without even trying them out. Most make their opinion about it because they saw game Y using engine X and think its the shizzle / shite, and come to the conclusion if the game is good / bad, the engine must be good / bad.

 

Just because the Crytek games look awesome does not mean their engine is awesome... graphics is 90% the quality of models, textures and shaders, and only about 10% the quality of the engines tech (the performance of most of the early Crytek games is actually horrible. Has to do with lots of highend effects for the time, but most probably also the engine that was not properly optimized. But this now is of course again me jumping to conclusions, just like the Unity naysayers were).

 

Just because there is no good horror game made with Unity on the market (and I have a hard time beliebving that) does not mean the engine is not suitable for it!

 

 

So rather than listen to vague, unfounded opinions, research it yourself. You can download the engine for free, and give it a try. Most probably it will just work fine for you, as soon as you start to understand how to build your game with it.



#7 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3159

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 07:54 AM

Hi,

 

 

Hey guys sorry i accidentally pressed enter . So i wanted to ask is Unity 3d right for a horror game. Unity3D is good for most game genre. "Right" connotates perfection, but you will not find a perfect game engine.  Can Unity3D be an excellent fit for game developing a horror game?  It sure can and that depends on your work ethic.

 

And also please suggest me a good 3d modelling tool and tool for creating audio for my game.  Unity3D developers have created the game engine to be able to work with most 3D modeling programs well in a workflow pipeline that you make for your development processes.  That's the long way of saying not to be concerned.  The 3D software typically export models in all the standard model file formats plus a few non-standard proprietary ones. Unity 3D, like most game engines, does accept some import from most 3D modelers, so if you choose a popular or common 3D modeler then there will be little or no trouble with compatibility.

 

Blender is a good match for Unity3D and its no cost.


Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#8 HassaanAtif   Members   -  Reputation: 128

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 12:48 PM

 

 

Woah dude!! thank you very much!! You've completely answered my question!! Actually most of the people were saying that its not suitable for a horror game. So i was getting confused. Anyways thanks again!! 

 

 

Okay, did this people give you a reason WHY they think its not suitable? I know a lot of people have a strong opinion about engines without even trying them out. Most make their opinion about it because they saw game Y using engine X and think its the shizzle / shite, and come to the conclusion if the game is good / bad, the engine must be good / bad.

 

Just because the Crytek games look awesome does not mean their engine is awesome... graphics is 90% the quality of models, textures and shaders, and only about 10% the quality of the engines tech (the performance of most of the early Crytek games is actually horrible. Has to do with lots of highend effects for the time, but most probably also the engine that was not properly optimized. But this now is of course again me jumping to conclusions, just like the Unity naysayers were).

 

Just because there is no good horror game made with Unity on the market (and I have a hard time beliebving that) does not mean the engine is not suitable for it!

 

 

So rather than listen to vague, unfounded opinions, research it yourself. You can download the engine for free, and give it a try. Most probably it will just work fine for you, as soon as you start to understand how to build your game with it.

 

Thank you very much dude. I really appreciate your answer.  Now i understand everything. And now i will stick with unity and will give a shot to blender to create 3d models!! . And use Audacity city to create sounds and i will use Adobe Photoshop for creating 3d textures! And one last thing that i wanna ask and that is how can i create horror, creepy music. Which software should i use? 
Thanks in advance!! biggrin.png smile.png



#9 Coder3189   Members   -  Reputation: 86

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Posted 11 September 2014 - 03:19 PM

I would personally use Unity3d for an horror game, you can add shadows, and change the scene to your liking. 

You can record your own music on garageband to make it more realistic. You can generate AI on unity3d

which kind of makes it neat in terms of making lots of zombies follow you.



#10 Orymus3   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 9959

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 06:08 AM

I thought Unity3D would be ideal for a horror game, but an acquaintance that is developing a game (using Unity3D, for a horror game) and which is being featured as an Early Access on Steam has recommended to be cautious. He's currently in the process of hacking an entirely custom lighting system into it because he strongly felt that the inner workings of lighting in Unity3D don't complement well the feel of a horror game.

 

Since I haven't tried it myself, I'm inclined to believe what he says is true, though it's hard to determine just "how bad" it is.

For everything else though, Unity3D can deliver.



#11 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22227

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 01:45 PM

Unity supports quite a lot of variations in lighting. You can do the normal point lights and spot lights, you can add light cookies (the little cutout shapes in lights) and shadows. In horror games they might also be using lots of what Unity calls "Sun Shafts", also known as "god rays" or "light beams" which can look amazing if you are trying to constrain what you see. It also supports layer-based blooms, crease shading, many kinds of light masks, and deferred lighting.

 

It is certainly possible that whatever specific feature he wants in his game may not be directly supported, but Unity provides many options out of the box.


Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.


#12 Truerror   Members   -  Reputation: 459

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 06:52 AM

There are already horror games out there made with Unity, so it's certainly 'right' for a horror game.

 

That, however, depends a lot on the mechanics of said horror game, and less on its theme.



#13 Shane C   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1283

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 09:22 PM

Creepiness depends on design instead of game engine. And either that designer possesses the skills to make a game creepy or doesn't. The technology is just a vehicle to help the designer reach his goal.

I once made a game people said was creepy in Construct, a 2D game engine.

#14 nesseggman   Members   -  Reputation: 364

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 11:33 PM

As for the lighting in Unity, since it was mentioned in a few comments, the free version of Unity is really terrible with built-in lighting. Pretty much you're not going to get any decent lighting or shadow effects whatsoever, unless you can program them yourself essentially from scratch. The engine features for lighting are pretty much ALL restricted until you buy the pro version for $1500.

 

This can be detrimental to your game if you want to rely on lighting for effect. Though there are workarounds, of course, but it will be a huge pain and you'll have to know a lot about lighting.

 

However, you can still make a very creepy game without using the lighting effects. Personally I think the game Clock Tower on SNES is very creepy and it's made with bright 2D sprites. Into the Gloom on Desura is a really creepy game made in Unity's free version. Personally it scared me a lot. It doesn't use lighting effects to create atmosphere but is still very scary.The recently popular Five Nights at Freddy's game is completely 2D and used pre-rendered 3D stills (which you can make in something like Blender). The infamous Imscared was made in GameMaker, an engine designed for 2D, and doesn't use advanced lighting or anything to be scary, but rather some unique mechanics and 'story.' (The links are to YouTube plays of those games if you were curious to their gameplay).

 

In short, there are tons of examples that the engine is not what is important to make a horror game; it's all in the design.

 

Since you don't seem to have a very strict idea of what you're wanting to make right now, consider designing your game around a concept that won't need intricate lighting if you're using the free version of Unity, or if you really want to do some intricate lighting, look elsewhere or buy the pro version of Unity.



#15 dahZee   Members   -  Reputation: 113

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 10:00 PM

Horror games are all about the design and art. The engine has little to do with making a game "horror." You need to have good artwork, and good level design to induce those types of feelings. The only time the engine would come into play is if it limited you in one of those aspects.






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