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Tile Map Editor - Individual Tile editing

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#1 Salty_Maia   Members   -  Reputation: 112

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Posted Today, 06:50 AM

Hi,

 

I'm currently researching into how to build a Tile Map Editor. The game in question is a 2D top-down action rpg. My problem is in regard to keeping uniqueness in the tiles while making an infinite-world (background loading of terrain as player moves through sub-areas, so as to have no in-game load time).

 

(TL;DR)

My question is: Is it possible to edit individual tiles in a tile map based game? if so, how is that data stored? Is it generated by the tilemap editor and actually stored as a completely new tile? Or is it the same old tile with a randomly-generated particle graphic overlayed? Are these options too cumbersome to generate in the background on gameplay?

 

As you can see, I'm sort of lost as to how to go about this, and I'm finding it pretty difficult to find research material on it. Any pointers would be welcome.

 

Here is an example of the feel I'm trying to achieve (game is Hyper Light Drifter):

 

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As you can see, every inch of terrain has a pretty unique feel to it, patches of grass, inset squares and cracks on the wall, mounds of snow on the stairs, etc. I don't know what sort of engine was used to produce this, not even if it's tilebased (should be somewhat tile based, right?). I also don't know if it implements infinite terrain

 

Any help would be much appreciated, I really want to have everything well planned out before I start development and I think this should be my last research step smile.png

 

Thank you!


Edited by Salty_Maia, Today, 06:51 AM.


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#2 PaloDeQueso   Members   -  Reputation: 285

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Posted Today, 07:48 AM

*Obligatory don't do it yourself unless you really have to reply!*

 

Before you delve into this, have you looked at Tiled (http://www.mapeditor.org/)? It's very powerful and would easily create these sorts of maps with the right tile-set.


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#3 Salty_Maia   Members   -  Reputation: 112

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Posted Today, 08:16 AM

*Obligatory don't do it yourself unless you really have to reply!*

 

Before you delve into this, have you looked at Tiled (http://www.mapeditor.org/)? It's very powerful and would easily create these sorts of maps with the right tile-set.

 

 

I have tried it, but I don't reckon it allows me much control over individual tile editing?

 

Meaning that instead of creating a full map with basic tiles and editing it with a pencil, I would have to create individual tiles for each uniqueness I want to create, and then put them in the map.

 

Maybe I'm wrong and I missed something when trying it but It just seems like an awful confusion to get a sense of uniqueness with tiled



#4 Krohm   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3251

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Posted Today, 08:21 AM

The tiles look unique in this screen, yes.

Try to compare across various screens. I think the brown/white bricklike decoration is perhaps the easiest repetition to spot.

 

In a tile-based game I prototyped about 1 year ago, I had "tile decorations" on top of tiles. They were basically mini-tiles themselves. Each cell had a tile and a list of decorations to be applied.



#5 jHaskell   Members   -  Reputation: 1088

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Posted Today, 09:44 AM


My problem is in regard to keeping uniqueness in the tiles while making an infinite-world

 

The reality is those two traits are mutually exclusive.  On the one side you have the Baldur's Gate games and their relatives, where each map is a custom crafted background image, but those games were very finite and creating a new map was a time consuming task.  On the other side you have Minecraft and its progenitors/derivatives which provide a practically endless variety of maps all based on a finite and obviously repetitive set of tiles (though the overall maps themselves provide a different kind of uniqueness).

 

The best you can do is attempt to provide the illusion of uniqueness, and there are a variety of techniques available to work toward that goal.  As Krohm mentioned, you can layer tiles and decorations/decals, but this is still limited by the variety of tiles and decorations/decals you create for the game.  You can also blend tiles together.  You can add dynamic color palettes to tiles.  You can scale/distort tiles.  You can combine all those techniques in any manner you wish.  The challenge is coming up with a randomly generated map that accomplishes this in a manner that doesn't result in a mess, and that's a pretty significant challenge.







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