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Advice on troublesome partner in profit share setup

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#1 Aperico   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted Today, 03:32 AM

Hello! I find myself in a bit of trouble since one of my team members refuse to cooperate. We are 5 members making a game sharing the profits. I had initial e-mail contact with all members asking questions etc before agreeing to add them to the team. This particular person I asked if he was willing to do all the things I had listed in previous e-mail for XX% share. He agreed. Ever since then everyone except him is working hard and we are progressing very well. But this person only answers evasive and have explanations why he can not do what he is supposed to. I have not even been able to make him join our teams collaboration site. He has not made any effort whatsoever at anything productive and when I ask what he needs to start working I get no answer.

 

So, I would like to get this person off the team. I am thinking since I had conditions for him getting any revenue share and he has not met any of them, I can just tell he he is off the team and we will look for someone else. My question now is if it is that simple? I have a very bad feeling about this person, I don't think anyone can be this uncooperative and still have a good agenda..

 

Appreciate any advice, thank you!



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#2 Ashaman73   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 12637

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Posted Today, 04:08 AM

Best to take your contract and consult a laywer. If you dont have a contract, then consult a laywer too.

Ashaman

 

Gnoblins: Website - Facebook - Twitter - Youtube - Steam Greenlit - IndieDB - Gamedev Log


#3 Aperico   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted Today, 04:32 AM

Ok, thank you for the answer. Does anyone have any tip of an online game lawyer that could settle this by looking at our email conversation?



#4 Gian-Reto   Members   -  Reputation: 4978

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Posted Today, 04:40 AM

Ok, thank you for the answer. Does anyone have any tip of an online game lawyer that could settle this by looking at our email conversation?

 

Don't think your e-mail history really qualifies as a legal document. Its better than just having an oral gentlements agreement, but its just that... a gentlements agreement.

 

Now, given that he hasn't contributed at all, you haven't signed any legal contracts, and he never gained access to any of your team internal servers/pages and actually used that access, you could shut him out of your internal systems, and then have a long and honest chat with him why you kick him out of the team.

 

Be respectful, but honest.

 

 

Of course, if there is anything legal that was signed, you need to contact a lawyer to make sure you handle it correctly. And if there is any work done by him, and you cannot flat out stop using it in your project, you also need a lawyer. His work is still his work when not done as your employee or with a signed freelancing contract.

 

 

To be honest, you should be thankful its only one in five. Depending on your own backstory, and what kind of volunteers you take onboard (completly inexpierienced vs. expierienced hobbysts vs professionals), you will always find guys that claim to be ready to contribute, but aren't. Some of them might even mean it, but loose motivation fast when they see the amount of work the need to be doing without getting paid for it.


Edited by Gian-Reto, Today, 04:44 AM.


#5 Aperico   Members   -  Reputation: 116

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Posted Today, 04:46 AM

There is no contract and he has done zero work. I have tried to get him started for a month now but he does not even want to log into our collab site (Trello) to take part of the material that is posted there by everyone for him (he is PR manager)


Edited by Aperico, Today, 04:46 AM.


#6 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 46547

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Posted Today, 05:08 AM

There is no contract

Then he will have a hard time demanding payment from you.

The real problem is that you also don't own the rights to the work produced by your other team members. Register a real limited liability company and have it write up legally binding contracts for all your participants.

#7 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 13345

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Posted Today, 09:09 AM


There is no contract

 

That's the source of your problem.

But it's also the solution. Tell him he's out. 

He might sue you, so get a lawyer.

Probably you should get a lawyer before you tell him he's out.

Then you need to write a collaboration agreement with the remaining team.  http://maientertainmentlaw.com/2008/11/collaboration/


-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#8 Gian-Reto   Members   -  Reputation: 4978

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Posted Today, 10:03 AM

 

The real problem is that you also don't own the rights to the work produced by your other team members. Register a real limited liability company and have it write up legally binding contracts for all your participants.

 

 

Quoted for truth. You actually got lucky with your current "bad team player"... you can just kick him out, without losing any work done. And if he tries to sue anyone, he has little legal grounds to do so (even though I guess Tom is right and you should get a lawyer just in case he tries).

 

What happens if your most valuable artist wants to leave the project in 6 months, and just disappears without giving you the rights to continue to use his prior work? Even worse, what if he leaves on bad terms and asks his work to be removed?

 

 

The longer the project, the more people involved, the more money involved in the end, the bigger the problems that can arise. Given that you hope for success, you should also plan for big problems. -> lawyer, create a company, create contracts for everyone to sign.







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