Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Stackoverflow And Money

  • You cannot reply to this topic
34 replies to this topic

#21   Members   -  Reputation: 3929

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 28 July 2016 - 07:27 AM

Agreed, that's way too high for London. London does pay more compared to the rest of the UK but a typical web developer with 3yrs experience does not get £90k for working in London. I've seen under half that for cool startups and never above 2/3rds that for someone with only 3 years experience.

But then a contractor can earn much more.  The low end is £350 per day up to around £650 per day.



#22   Moderators   -  Reputation: 5206

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 28 July 2016 - 07:36 AM

That's comparing apples and oranges though. Salaries are usually lower than contractor rates because they're more dependable, they include office costs and overheads, etc.

#23   Members   -  Reputation: 2390

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 28 July 2016 - 11:13 AM

The base pay seems a bit high, but the location adjustment seems a bit paltry in comparison.

Overall, it's certainly high to me, but gamedev isn't exactly known to pay well.

#24   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 3039

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 28 July 2016 - 03:28 PM

I searched around a while on job sites ...

The range for "entry level" jobs pays $35,000 - $50,000 .

Experienced ( 5+ years ) .... $60,000 - $85,000 .

Management positions $95,000 - $140,000 .

 

All this depends on where you live, and are willing to travel.

 India is hiring for $400 - $1,200 a month !

 


I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Code_Fox_Sig.png


#25   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 18490

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2016 - 11:49 AM

Looking at these shining numbers, I can only wonder what shit I should put up with to have this god-forsaken salary... I earn less than 60% of what's displayed there (and I modestly ranked my skill at 1 just to be safe).

then again, need to factor the cost of living and rent (tell that to the people who work at google!!)


-=- My Articles -=-
Getting Games Done - Method and tools on how to start a hobby project and get it Done!

The Art of Enemy Design in Zelda: A Link to the Past - Reverse-engineering functional enemy design from applied example.

Retro Mortis - "RTS" - Article Series (4 Parts) on the history of RTS development (4th part finally released!!!)

 


#26   Moderators   -  Reputation: 40180

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2016 - 02:34 PM

I searched around a while on job sites ...

The range for "entry level" jobs pays $35,000 - $50,000 .

Experienced ( 5+ years ) .... $60,000 - $85,000 .

Management positions $95,000 - $140,000 .

 

All this depends on where you live, and are willing to travel.

 India is hiring for $400 - $1,200 a month !

 

Way back when I exited school in 1995 in the United States in a region with approximately median cost of living, we had some statistics taken from the student body.  The CS department was the only group where the statistics for employment was "1", as in 100% had jobs or job offers.  The CS department's self-reported wages at graduation were in the $55,000 to $60,000 range fresh from school, unlike the other departments where students were in the $30K, $45K, and similar ranges.

 

The Game Developer Salary Survey has been running strong for many years now.  Here's the 2016 numbers for programmers, with averages for the US:

 

* Game programmer, under 3 years experience: $72,000

* Non-lead, non-senior, non-management game programmer with 6+ years experience, $105,000

 

They have some regional variation (Silicon Valley and NYC are more money) and they don't publicly break down their survey into bigger ranges. Those with 10+ years experience tend to make even more and cross above $120K, and those long-career numbers are on par with what I saw on the stack overflow site.

 

 

There are far too many people in this industry who accept lowball offers. They're often thinking "I don't care how low you pay me, please give me a job in this field."  Of course companies will be glad to hire you if you accept far less than you should be earning.  The company runs a risk that when you discover the wages you will leave, but for them it is cheap labor.

 

Figure out what salary you are worth, figure out how to justify it, and then negotiate well with the company. 


Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I occasionally write about assorted stuff.


#27   Members   -  Reputation: 1096

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2016 - 04:46 PM

It's a lot compared to the UK - well, maybe I'm being ripped off (I've only had one full time job, so haven't looked around at rates in years), but the general perception is that the US pays a lot more (and I don't work in finance).

OTOH I'm thankful to have a reasonable amount of holiday, I can't put a price on that. And I'm still paid far more than the median in the UK, so I'm not complaining.

"There are far too many people in this industry who accept lowball offers."

But all the people commenting earning less seem to not be in the US, so statistics about the US are meaningless. It's nothing to do with accepting lowball offers.

http://erebusrpg.sourceforge.net/ - Erebus, Open Source RPG for Windows/Linux/Android
http://conquests.sourceforge.net/ - Conquests, Open Source Civ-like Game for Windows/Linux


#28   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 3039

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2016 - 07:36 PM

The Game Developer Salary Survey has been running strong for many years now.  Here's the 2016 numbers for programmers, with averages for the US:

 

.

 That site's numbers are not matching what I am finding with job postings ... maybe they are pulling figures from high paying areas, or 'future projected pay' statistics  ?

 I spent more time rummaging around many different employment websites ... the newest 120 listings for "entry level" came back under $48,000 .

 

Could you post a real job listing for "entry level programmer" at $72,000? I am unable to find anything legitimate.


I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Code_Fox_Sig.png


#29   Moderators   -  Reputation: 40180

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2016 - 09:31 PM

 I spent more time rummaging around many different employment websites ... the newest 120 listings for "entry level" came back under $48,000 .

 

If they need to advertise like that for an entry level game developer they're probably not a great place to work at.  All my recent employers have had enough of a steady stream of applicants to keep the jobs filled with quality workers.

 

The actual pay always depends on the negotiation, but our fresh graduates (in Austin) earn around $60K and get a moderate raise at the end of the first year. Before that, at my prior employer (in Salt Lake City) our part time CS students generally started at least $20/hr (equivalent to $40K annually if it were full time) with a large increase to around $60K upon graduation and joining us full time.


Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I occasionally write about assorted stuff.


#30   Members   -  Reputation: 1226

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 30 July 2016 - 10:29 PM

Here is an article on salary bands at major companies: https://blog.step.com/2016/04/08/an-open-source-project-for-tech-salaries/



#31   Members   -  Reputation: 256

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 01 August 2016 - 10:32 AM

Holy shit...I'm living in Spain and my salary is 25K(one year of experience as a :NET web developer), the worst is that this is a a good salary for a webdeveloper in spain...



#32   Members   -  Reputation: 1872

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 09 August 2016 - 01:05 AM

Holy shit...I'm living in Spain and my salary is 25K(one year of experience as a :NET web developer), the worst is that this is a a good salary for a webdeveloper in spain...

 

The real salary you earn also depends on the value of your currency, quality of life in your country, country-wide inflationary/deflationary pressures,  local region expensiveness/inexpensiveness Vs taxation and generally purchasing power of your country (and including as mentioned in previous post various benefits from your company) 

 

For example UK is a comparatively medium salary, high taxation country, but in return we enjoy free health care (NHS), fairly good public transportation, and relative low inflationary pressures. But then there is also huge regional differences- London and South east for instance is very expensive while as you go northwards it gets relatively cheaper.

 

So depending on all of the above your 25K could be equivalent to say 60k in the US (or may be equivalent to 15K :()

 

Independent of where I live I believe my skills and creativity would self-sell me to the appropriate level at the right time, but even in the worst case scenario that it doesn't - its not worth getting stressed about it, you would only work yourself up, age quicker and get more devalued   :wub:


Just need to let some steam out, so my head doesn't explode...

#33   Moderators   -  Reputation: 40180

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 09 August 2016 - 01:54 PM

 

Here is an article on salary bands at major companies: https://blog.step.com/2016/04/08/an-open-source-project-for-tech-salaries/

 

Holy shit...I'm living in Spain and my salary is 25K(one year of experience as a :NET web developer), the worst is that this is a a good salary for a webdeveloper in spain...

 

"Web developer" is not on that chart.   At least, not what most people call a web developer.

 

The lowest tier on that chart requires a 4-year degree and is doing actual software engineering tasks.  They are technical work at major tech companies.  It is a professional career track, the type of job that up until last decade required going to the office in a business suit.

 

Most of the time a "web developer" is not those things. A web developer spends their days hooking up some data to forms or building pages in drupal or wordpress or similar. No serious database work, no serious programming work, skills you can pick up with a one-week seminar plus searching the web.  


Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I occasionally write about assorted stuff.


#34   Members   -  Reputation: 2162

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 09 August 2016 - 06:42 PM

$200k for a god tier engineering manager in San Francisco seems kind of low to me.  Really low for Silicon Valley.  I hear our server admin talking about his friends getting jobs in the area with a lot less experience and getting $150k+.



#35   Members   -  Reputation: 256

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 10 August 2016 - 02:08 AM

 

Holy shit...I'm living in Spain and my salary is 25K(one year of experience as a :NET web developer), the worst is that this is a a good salary for a webdeveloper in spain...

 

The real salary you earn also depends on the value of your currency, quality of life in your country, country-wide inflationary/deflationary pressures,  local region expensiveness/inexpensiveness Vs taxation and generally purchasing power of your country (and including as mentioned in previous post various benefits from your company) 

 

For example UK is a comparatively medium salary, high taxation country, but in return we enjoy free health care (NHS), fairly good public transportation, and relative low inflationary pressures. But then there is also huge regional differences- London and South east for instance is very expensive while as you go northwards it gets relatively cheaper.

 

So depending on all of the above your 25K could be equivalent to say 60k in the US (or may be equivalent to 15K :()

 

Independent of where I live I believe my skills and creativity would self-sell me to the appropriate level at the right time, but even in the worst case scenario that it doesn't - its not worth getting stressed about it, you would only work yourself up, age quicker and get more devalued   :wub:

 

 

Yes I know, that's why in my post said that 25K is a 'good' salary in spain for an IT engineer(mine was a 5-year career,  I think it's equivalent to a degree + master in europe, at least for other engineerings, computer science was always the black sheep of enginering in Spain so...who really knows,) with one year of experience. For now we have free health care, but spanish politians are trying really hard to fuck it with their budget reductions, and for taxes, well, I think Spain is one of the countries with more taxes, and living in Barcelona is not cheap.

 

@Frob, I was talking about the first post, not the graph which I didn't even see  :( . Btw, some tech companies still required to come to work with a suit, like Everis, mine too, but it's because I'm working for a prestigious law firm and..well, you know...lawyers with a 'classical' mind (sorry, I don't know a more appropiate term for this in english).

 

Well, at the end I was just surprised about the salaries in other countries, even if I already knew that are much higuer than in Spain.







PARTNERS