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Getting a job in the gaming industry


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#1 Bobas_Dog   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 22 January 2000 - 06:47 PM

Hello All, I am a senior in college (CmpSci), and I was wondering how I would best approach getting a job in the game industry. I''ve made many clones of simple games (pong and the such), but I''m certain that a company would like to see more than that. I know openGL reasonably well (I took a CG course last semester, and did well, but my programs ran incredibly slow and the scenes were not even remotely complex as a Quake scene). This leads me to believe I need to take another approach to developing a 3d game (BSP tree or something) in order to speed it up. Having said all that, this is my question: If I were to make a 3d game, what would be more impressive to a company, a game made using something like Genesis3d, or should I write the entire game and graphics engine (using OpenGL)? Or should I consider something else? Thanks for your time, Andy

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#2 kressilac   Members   -  Reputation: 110

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Posted 23 January 2000 - 03:30 PM

Having been going through many resumes for my game project venture, I have this to say about your question. I want someone who can code the engine if at all possible, but that has enough working knowledge of a prebuilt engine to begin to use it immediately. The pre-built engine (were using Netimmerse) allows artists to get to work right away, and allows my 3D programmer to look into enhancing the pre-built engine to do what we need for the game. All in all it adds up to a faster implementation assuming the knowledge is there.

My answer to your question is one or the other is a good thing but a complete candidate will have both.

KRessilac


#3 I-Shaolin   Members   -  Reputation: 138

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Posted 28 January 2000 - 01:45 AM

I know exactly what you are talking about. I was there not too long ago. If you have to choose, go with writing your own engine.

A lot of companies will give programming tests to people who don''t have any industry experience, but in reality, this tend to be more 3D math tests. You''ll be much more prepared for this kind of test if you know how to build an engine from the ground up.




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