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Question on Learning C++


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#1 Gorf_Rules   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 05:03 AM

Okay I''ve been trying ot learn C++ for awhile and have purchased learn Visual C++ 6 in 21 days SAMS and Learn C++ in 21 days by some one I don''t member who, its a red book, I can tell you when I get home from school. I''m just wondering if learning C++ in 21 days is ethical or really possible jsut to learn the basics that are needed to begin basic game development, Also as Christmas approachs and my parents are demanding my list of stuff I would like what books should I put down that cover concepts that arn''t covered in theis book? Thanx Alot all you Ghuru''s Gorf

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#2 StaticX313   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 05:43 AM

I dont know.. I dont really like those kind of books (teach yourself in 21 days, C++6 bible, etc). They seem to technical and all. I like the books OpenGL programming and the Zen of Direct 3D programming the most. Mainly cause it was fun stuff to learn to program. *They also teach c++ windows programming in those books*. But they werent all technical and stuff. I liked how they seemed like normal people, had fun in their books, explained everything that you did, and it got me started on my way to some good programming and was very understandable *even for ppl who havent ever programmed in windows/c++*. So I suggest those books if your goin to make games/graphics/etc.. if you got any more Qs just lmk

RoB~

#3 zealouselixir   Members   -  Reputation: 237

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 05:44 AM

Hey. First off, you''re not going to master C++ in 21 days if you''re just starting out. It''ll take you one year plus to get to inheritance most likely, since you seem to have little or no programming experience. (btw, Teach Yourself In 21 Days is by Jesse Liberty, at least the first four editions, and it sounds like you have the Professional or Office Reference Edition [something like that - it''s hardcover, right?]). Anyway, I''d recommend that you plod through the TYC++I21D first, then and only then should you start learning MFC (which is what TYVC++I21D covers, mostly).

Hope this helps,

ZE

#4 Rube   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 05:52 AM

I don''t think learning any particular aspect of programming will take you a year, or any amount of specific time. Some people pick up pointers right away, some take a year to get them straight. Same with OOP, including inheritance and polymorphism and other topics.

I do agree, it will probably take you a good year to get comfortable with most of the language and practice it to know it''s use. It''s pretty easy to learn the concepts of the language, but there are so many little details to implimentation it takes time and hard work. I don''t know anyone who is so good with C or C++ they can be said to know the entire language.

You can learn C++ in 21 days, but you might need longer to get good. Just start small, write lots of programs to test questions you have and you''ll learn well enough. Just have to invest some time outside of the book to really learn C and C++. You can start doing some basic graphics programming without knowing how to write a good class or how inheritance works. Every little program you write will make you a better programmer.

G''luck in it all!

R.

#5 Oluseyo   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 07:09 AM

quote:
Original post by Rube
I don''t know anyone who is so good with C or C++ they can be said to know the entire language.

I know the entire language.

#6 CaptainJester   Members   -  Reputation: 523

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 07:22 AM

Once you get some of the C++ under your belt, you can turn to "Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus" by Andre Lamothe. It teaches you enough windows programming to get up and running, then it concentrates on DirectX for the rest of the book. It doesn''t cover Direct3D, because he is putting that in his follow up book. It also only touches on DirectPlay,Sound and Music. The last quarter of the book gives an overview of various game programming algorithms, like AI and pathfinding.

---
Make it work.
Make it right.
Make it fast.

#7 Big B   Members   -  Reputation: 337

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 07:26 AM

I''d suggest you get a introductory computer science book. It will present ideas that are applicable in any language and help you become a better programmer overall.

These books can be pretty expensive though, so its probably good that its Xmas time.

#8 Lorek   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 09:53 AM

A great book which I used to learn the basic concepts
and still use as reference is
The Waite Group
Object-Oriented Programing In C++
Second Edition. By Robert Lafore

Its the best book I''ve seen out of some of the
course books the colleges around here require.

It gives a lot of sample code and really goes
into detail. Anyone here seen this book before?

Ps. They prolly have a third edition out by now.
The books pretty old.

#9 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 10:02 AM

C++ can be compared to Chess. It takes minutes to learn, but a lifetime to master.

#10 Drizzt DoUrden   Members   -  Reputation: 100

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 10:03 AM

I have read Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days more than 15 times and I am just beginner-intermediate in my opinion. I still have a ton of questions that come into my head when I try to program games.

It takes a long time to learn.

The outcome is worth it. I am not in a rush anyway.

------------------------------

"He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster... when you gaze long into the abyss, the abyss also gazes into you..."~Friedrich Nietzsche

"So quiet, another wasted night, the television steals the conversation. Exhale, another wasted breathe, again it goes unnoticed...." ~ Dashboard Confessional

#11 krez   GDNet+   -  Reputation: 443

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Posted 05 December 2001 - 04:56 PM

quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
C++ can be compared to Chess. It takes minutes to learn, but a lifetime to master.

actually, it is Othello that "takes a minute to learn, but a lifetime to master"...

--- krez (krezisback@aol.com)

#12 Gorf_Rules   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 06 December 2001 - 01:27 AM

Ya thanks for some of the pointers, I have already learnt basic VB 6 and have been tinkering around with C++ but havn''t really got that far yet, I just recently decided to make the step into C++ since I only have 2 class''s this semester so I seem to have lots and lots of time on my hands. Can anyone give me a site with some basic projects to make that give instructions to make but not the code, but the code is there if needed, by that I mean not a site where i''m going to open to a ton of code and just say like pacman or something above it...

Thanx

Geoff

#13 Lorek   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 06 December 2001 - 10:52 AM

If you want I can email you some problems but I don''t have the code previously made out. Also what section problems do you want?

#14 Gorf_Rules   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 11 December 2001 - 04:47 AM

Anything is good really, I have started but seem to get discouraged by tutorials and such that don''t really describe the code. I own teach yourself C++ in 21 days not Sams, by some older guy no clue of his name, I have Sams teach yourself Visual C++ 6 in 21 days and both of this seem to bore me and I find arn''t really all that descriptive of code and expect you to learn something just by seeing the code typed out. I''m planning on adding "C++ Primer Plus" to my Christmas List so I will probably get it, it seems to be very common and is hard to find at most bookstores without ordering it. Thanx

Geoff

#15 TotalCoder   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 11 December 2001 - 05:37 AM

When I was transitioning from Visual Basic to C++ I bought the For Dummies book, and it was helpful in remembering the basics. However, the best way to learn C++ is know the basics the Waite Group book is good, as well as Practical C++ by, I forgot, but it is a predominately black cover with red highlights.

I like someone''s previous analogy concerning chess, they''re are many a times when I was learning a concept and could not get it, but all of a sudden months later, I get it!

But persist and you can become a good coder, but none of the 21 days or 24 hour books will teach you enough to write a bleeding edge game, but those concepts are the basis for what most games or commercial applications are written in.

Sam
-----
TotalCoder
http://www.totalcoder.com
"Resources, tutorials, and articles for the novice, part-time, and hobbyist programmer"

#16 Gorf_Rules   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 11 December 2001 - 07:20 AM

Well i''m just trying to get a start because next year I will be enrolled in College where I will be learning C++ but I figured I would learn the basis and maybe more soI don''t get lost in the shuffle of people trying to become unlost.

Do you get what I am trying to say?....

Geoff

#17 AEBergen1980   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 11 December 2001 - 07:34 AM

Most college computer science courses don''t touch on programming for windows at all... Everything is console based. Unless you are signed up for a course like "Visual Basic" or "Windows Programming", count on all of your windows programming to be console-based, dos style programs. This means that C++ in 21 days should be a good way to prep yourself for your intro courses. VC++ in 21 days should be more fun... I used it to get my first intro to windows programming, and it is a very good introduction, convering a wide range of topics, though none in depth.

As far as ethical goes... Yes. Learn as a quick as possible. Just don''t claim mastery or try to get a job at $40k+ based on 2 books and 3 or 6 weeks of experience.

#18 Gorf_Rules   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 12 December 2001 - 01:34 AM

actually this course is really good, it covers JAVA, C++, VB, OpenG, and DX the course is here,

www.fanshawec.on.ca/Info_About_Programs/Programs/RelCourses/CRS-CPA2.asp

that shows the semesters named levels, and havs info on the courses taken in the program its about 3.5 year course with Co-op.

Geoff

#19 CaptainJester   Members   -  Reputation: 523

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Posted 12 December 2001 - 02:22 AM

The course list looks very good. Covers a wide range of topics. The only question I have, is this a well recognized college? People recognize the name Algonquin, but I have never heard of Fanshawe. Has it been around for a while? Employers will not only look at your education, they look at where you got it. If you had a computer diploma from Uncle Willies Private College, it would not hold much water. Just make sure that the diploma will be recognised.

---
Make it work.
Make it right.
Make it fast.

#20 Gorf_Rules   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 12 December 2001 - 04:30 AM

Yes the college has been around for quite some long time, my parents actually went to it so it has been around about 30 years if not more. They have I believe 6 campus's though I could be wrong, its not some college that just sprung up overnight I promise you that.

I actually found some information that said it was erected between 30 and 40 years ago.

Geoff

Edited by - Gorf_Rules on December 12, 2001 11:36:59 AM




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