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Do I know what I'm doing?


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#1 Travis   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 28 January 2000 - 03:45 PM

I will graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of North Texas this May, and I''m not sure if I''m at the right place at the right time. I''m currently taking advanced game programming and computer graphics this semester, and last semester I completed a game demo and a game programming course. I want to get a job in the game industry, but all I have is education and a game to show off my game programming and development skills. I wrote my cover page and resume last week, and I realized that I have no real computer industry experience except for my small computer hardware business that has nothing to do with the game industry. I would have liked to work in the computer industry in college, but it took the Coop office at UNT forever to get anything done plus they didn''t have any game industry jobs. This made the process of finding a job in the game industry very frustrating. If I had known what I know now I would have gone out on my own to get a job in the computer industry earlier, but instead I worked my way through college by working at jobs that I didn''t enjoy. So I need to know what kind of job I can get with the game I wrote and my college degree. The options I''m willing to consider and my feelings on the option include the following: Masters Degree = I''m tired of school for now Internship = Probably not enough $ Entry Level Game Programmer = I think I''m ready Game Programmer = Maybe but probably over my head Lead Game Programmer = Probably not for 3-5 years CEO of my own game company = Now I know I''m dreaming Now your probably thinking I''m pretty silly, but really I have no idea what the job market is like. The main media and the government say the job market is great, but I know that''s bull because no one is jumping up and down offering good paying jobs. Sure unemployment is low, but that doesn''t mean that the economy is great. On the contrary if everyone were slaving away then I would say the economy sucks because that means that no one has enough money to stay unemployed and do fun stuff like ride a motorcycle across the country or whatever floats your boat. Plus zero years for the stock market are particularly poor, and this may cause a hiring slow down and even a large number of firings. Plus I don''t know if I''m at the best location. The Game Industry in North Texas is supposed to be great, but I can''t prove that. From my web searches I would say that Texas, California, and Washington are the best places. Where is the best place to enter the game industry? I would prefer a location relatively close to snowy slopes or sandy beaches if I could choose. Thank You in advance

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#2 Sixpack   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 28 January 2000 - 07:01 PM

Travis:
I think one of the more important things to have (other than on the job experience) is a completed game project of your own to show off.
If you can afford it, head over to the GameDeveloper''s Conf. (March 8th, I think.. should be spring break) Bring copies of your demo and copies of your resume (many,many copies). Talk to people there. Introduce yourself.

Good luck-
Six

#3 Travis   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 28 January 2000 - 08:06 PM

I actually plan on going, and I was planning to do exactly what you said. I thought it might be a little extreme going so far to hook up with a few game companies, but I have always wanted to see the ocean anyways. I will have a pretty well developed game by the beginning of March, and with the time I have left I will burn some CD''s with my CD burner before I go to the Expo portion of the conference. I will still miss atleast one class, but that''s a small price to pay.

#4 Travis   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Posted 28 January 2000 - 08:06 PM

I actually plan on going, and I was planning to do exactly what you said. I thought it might be a little extreme going so far to hook up with a few game companies, but I have always wanted to see the ocean anyways. I will have a pretty well developed game by the beginning of March, and with the time I have left I will burn some CD''s with my CD burner before I go to the Expo portion of the conference. I will still miss atleast one class, but that''s a small price to pay.

Thank You


#5 Gromit   Members   -  Reputation: 144

Posted 28 January 2000 - 08:10 PM

You think that they pay crappy in the US? The standard wage for an entry level business programming position is $30,000-$35,000. (if you are one of the lucky ones) Now traslate that into american dollars? Not so much eh? What is that, like $20,000-$25,000? Now keep in mind that I live in Ontario... PST and GST = 15% tax on everything you buy. Now I'm not too sure on this next point, (because I haven't found a job yet) but I believe that they take out more then any other province in UI, Income Tax.. etc.

Our standard of living is pretty high here, but what happens if I want to visit the states? I'll be a poor man.

The Canadian Government is wondering why all the technical people are moving to the states to work! Every week there is some news show that talks about "canada's brain drain".

Anyways, sorry to babble on.



Edited by - Gromit on 1/29/00 2:25:30 AM

#6 I-Shaolin   Members   -  Reputation: 138

Posted 29 January 2000 - 01:32 AM

Travis,

Well, I guess everybody''s situation is different, but you are not in as bad of shape as you may think. I graduated college not too long ago, and I was able to find a great job in the industry. Don''t let your location discourage you. I am from Arkansas originally.

First, start putting your resume on the web at every place you can find, especially with recruitment agencies. There''s one in Texas called Scientific Placement that''s pretty good. Well, do this once you start getting a little closer to graduating.

Also, I don''t know your skills exactly, but if you want my suggestion, 3D Theory, DirectX, and Windows are the best selling points. I probably got my job more for my Windows and MFC background than my game prorgamming experience.

The demo is good, but make sure it is polished. A simple game that is complete is better than a advanced game that isn''t. Companies want to know that you can complete a project.

Well, there you go. You don''t have a lot of time, so try to learn as much as you can and get a demo completed.




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