Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

What education do I need?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
26 replies to this topic

#1 BlackHammer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 08:53 AM

I have several questions that I need answered: How many wpm should I be able to type? Would a college education be better or University education? If either, which coures should I take? What should I learn on my own? _________________________________________________________________ I would Like to let everyone know that I have next to no knowledge on C, C++, or other programming languages.

Sponsor:

#2 Palidine   Members   -  Reputation: 1279

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 08:58 AM

um,

first question would be what job are you looking for? designer? programmer? manager? marketing?

in any case wpm doesn't come into play. code doesn't really break down into words per say and how much code you can program per minute is meaningless.

also for the undergraduate level of education there is no difference between a college and a university outside of universitys typically being able to offer more resources b/c they tend to be bigger (though that;s probs an over generalization)

how old are you?

-me

Edited by - Palidine on January 11, 2002 4:01:30 PM

#3 BlackHammer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 09:00 AM

I am thinking in the direction of designer and/or programmer. You see, I am REALLY good at math and this is an industry that I have looked into for the past year.

#4 Palidine   Members   -  Reputation: 1279

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 09:02 AM

see my edits to my earlier post....

-me

#5 Palidine   Members   -  Reputation: 1279

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 09:06 AM

as a first response i''d say that if you''re in high school, find a computer science course to take and see if you like programming. if you''re not in high school yet but are motivated then find a c or c++ intro book and give a shot at teaching yourself to program. or better yet find a friend to teach you.

-me

#6 BlackHammer   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 09:14 AM

I am 19 as of the end of January. Right now I am a high school student, and yes, I am going to take programming courses as of next semester.

#7 Palidine   Members   -  Reputation: 1279

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 09:22 AM

heh, my lunchbreak= infinite replys

anyway, cool. learning a language is the first thing. if it turns out that you hate sitting in front of a computer debugging code for hours but are still interested in gaming, then perhaps conceptual design or team management might be better.

anyway, the first thing to figure out is programmer v. something else.

then you gotta pick a college. find one with a good CS department but also one that''s got some other really good stuff going for it in case you end up hating everything to do with programming and gaming (i was going to be a doctor but then fell in love with programming and switched majors). actually most people i know completely changed their minds in college about what they wanted to do. some funny changes of mind were literature to computer science and someone else did math to literature.

as i said before for undergraduate education (i.e. your first time through) university == college. same thing.

anyway if you''ve got AIM and want a faster conversation send a message to Malted Monkey

-me



#8 garconbifteck   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 11:03 AM

Maybe this is a dumb question.
No wait it IS.

What is computer sciences?

I know like programming comes under it but like what IS it?

Website:PC-Gaming

MSN messenger:garcon_bifteck@hotmail.com

Email:garconbifteck@pc-gaming.com


#9 max621   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 11:09 AM

The science of everything realated to computers
Like social science is history, current events, etc.
Wild guess...

||--------------------------||
Black Hole Productions
President/Programmer/Expert on stuff
||--------------------------||

#10 Floppy   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 11:11 AM

Computer science is a a seperate major on its own. Many people major in it. Essentially, if you major in computer science, you are going to learn the ins and out of all the theoretical "stuff" that is in programming, lots of math, and how to program a myriad of complex things.

For example, you''ll learn order of magnitude ("Big O"), operating systems, security, network design, programming techniques, and more programming techniques, all sorts of theory, you can specialize in all sorts of things, there''s more...

#11 garconbifteck   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 11:26 AM

My conclusion

Computer science = all the computer stuff

Website:PC-Gaming

MSN messenger:garcon_bifteck@hotmail.com

Email:garconbifteck@pc-gaming.com


#12 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

Likes

Posted 11 January 2002 - 07:00 PM

I won''t even bother reading what anyone else has said. No, I''ll relate my own experience here.

This is the "For Beginners" forum, right? So many people come here and made fourteen-year-old kids think they just _have_ to learn Calculus and Computer Science right this minute. Poppycock.

I will tell you that, when it comes to math, it doesn''t take long before it all comes together and you get your foot in the door (ouch!)-- but only if you are determined to learn it. That is a firm rule. You have to be determined. For math, always be aware of your weakness, and try to fix it. _That''s_ the only part that takes time.

The best place to learn what you don''t know is, despite what EVERYONE else will tell you in this lame forum, is the library. It''s the perfect place to study. You have books all around you, so there''s no lacking of information-- you could find a book on Calculus if you wanted to (I have ). Actually, a lot of the best information out there is at the library.

At school and even on these supposedly reader-friendly internet tutorials, they give you really technical stuff you just cross your eyes over. Don''t be embarassed because everyone would.

But at the library, I found a book called "Calculus the Easy Way," which is a Calculus text in the form of a humorous fantasy story, where the characters solve problems and discover the principles of Calculus along the way. What''s more, it''s just one in a whole series of books. There''s one on Trigonometry, Physics, writing, typing, and even a few on programming (Fortran, BASIC, and Pascal).

So, go to the library, and go there a lot. On the Internet, you MIGHT find something interesting. But at the classic library, you WILL. And you don''t even need to pay anyone.

Take things one at a time (baby steps). And remember that this might not be your field. What I did see of your other replies, someone asked what you want to become-- a designer, a programmer, et cetera. Do you really _want_ to be in this field at all? I know I don''t. I do this as a hobby, and I have other interests. Just take things one step at a time.

And I''m sure you''re typing skills won''t hold you back.

#13 dragin33   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 07:43 PM

If you decide to persue any number of options for game development there is a great school in Florida called full sail. It''s a little pricey though. Look into it. http://www.fullsail.com

#14 GoofProg   Members   -  Reputation: 127

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 08:16 PM

1) Do not worry about WPM. Your typing skills will improve after typing code for awhile.
2) Education? Buy a book and read it. That''s about it. To be a good ''certified'' programmer, you need at least some type of degree. There are famous programmers that dropped out of college, but do you really want to take that chance?

There is alot of math involved. You''ll need at least trig, but it depends on what you are coding.

I am pretty much in the same boat .. too many questions and doubts. Just keep close to the goal that you have.

I recommend learning BASIC first and then moving over to C/C++ or pascal. There is a qbasic program on your windows OS disk.. or just visit download.com and look up basic.

Eventually learn C/C++ or pascal.. most people choose the second choice.

pascal is similar to C.. so the conversion should not be a problem.

good luck.



#15 hapaboy   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 09:36 PM

quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I won't even bother reading what anyone else has said. No, I'll relate my own experience here.

This is the "For Beginners" forum, right? So many people come here and made fourteen-year-old kids think they just _have_ to learn Calculus and Computer Science right this minute. Poppycock.

I will tell you that, when it comes to math, it doesn't take long before it all comes together and you get your foot in the door (ouch!)-- but only if you are determined to learn it. That is a firm rule. You have to be determined. For math, always be aware of your weakness, and try to fix it. _That's_ the only part that takes time.

The best place to learn what you don't know is, despite what EVERYONE else will tell you in this lame forum, is the library. It's the perfect place to study. You have books all around you, so there's no lacking of information-- you could find a book on Calculus if you wanted to (I have ). Actually, a lot of the best information out there is at the library.

At school and even on these supposedly reader-friendly internet tutorials, they give you really technical stuff you just cross your eyes over. Don't be embarassed because everyone would.

But at the library, I found a book called "Calculus the Easy Way," which is a Calculus text in the form of a humorous fantasy story, where the characters solve problems and discover the principles of Calculus along the way. What's more, it's just one in a whole series of books. There's one on Trigonometry, Physics, writing, typing, and even a few on programming (Fortran, BASIC, and Pascal).

So, go to the library, and go there a lot. On the Internet, you MIGHT find something interesting. But at the classic library, you WILL. And you don't even need to pay anyone.

Take things one at a time (baby steps). And remember that this might not be your field. What I did see of your other replies, someone asked what you want to become-- a designer, a programmer, et cetera. Do you really _want_ to be in this field at all? I know I don't. I do this as a hobby, and I have other interests. Just take things one step at a time.

And I'm sure you're typing skills won't hold you back.


You know what....that was beautiful, sniff =.).. This post actually answers questions that Ive asked in this forum before and that have gone unanswered. I am very good at math and logic but I sometimes wonder if all the veterans in these forums are geniuses and Im completely wasting my time.

The problem is that I am a newbie at programming and I often look through higher level books only to cringe at the sight of the material. Remember when you were a little kid and you passed by the higher classes only to see all this gibberish on the blackboard and a feeling of curiosity coupled with fear came over you? Thats how I feel. Its reassuring to see that it happens or has happened to others in here too and that perhaps I have a chance =). This post should be permanently placed atop this forum for all scared newbies to read.


Edited by - hapaboy on January 12, 2002 4:37:20 AM

#16 garconbifteck   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 11 January 2002 - 11:53 PM

quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
But at the library, I found a book called "Calculus the Easy Way," which is a Calculus text in the form of a humorous fantasy story, where the characters solve problems and discover the principles of Calculus along the way. What''s more, it''s just one in a whole series of books. There''s one on Trigonometry


Well last year my stupid maths teacher failed to drill a single bit of trig into my head, we are nearly about to do more work on it again (with a much better maths teacher might i add though), errmmm... What where these books called?, they might just save my so-far-short life....



Website:PC-Gaming

MSN messenger:garcon_bifteck@hotmail.com

Email:garconbifteck@pc-gaming.com


#17 BlackHwk4   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 12 January 2002 - 01:23 AM

garconbifteck,

The trig book is called Trigonometry The Easy Way. It''s ISBN # is 0-7641-1360-7. I''ve been reading the trig one and the Physics The Easy Way and they both have been good so far.

#18 garconbifteck   Members   -  Reputation: 122

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 12 January 2002 - 02:45 AM

Thanks



Thats it.... right?

Edited by - garconbifteck on January 12, 2002 9:50:11 AM

#19 GoofProg   Members   -  Reputation: 127

Like
Likes
Like

Posted 14 January 2002 - 03:35 AM

When I took trig, it was pretty much learning the formulas (as with any math class).

I learned what the unit circle was and the big three trig functions sin, cos, and tan.
Then learned the inverse functions.. and graphed the guys.

remember to learn these functions
sin(u-v)
sin(u+v)
cos(u-v)
cos(u+v)
+half angle and double angle formulas


A lot of formulas are extracted from them.
I took this last semester.. and I shiver when I look in my Calculus book..
my instructor DID skip over vectors.. DOH!!! so I think it''s going to be another book throwing semester.
(nothing like throwing the book across the room.. taking another look at it and actually figuring it out)


I am not a teenager either... so I consider myself a late bloomer at 24 years old... I''m probably older than 50% of most members on gamedev!

Mathematics is NOT easy, but it is rewarding. I can look at one of my 3D books and understand half the formulas now.


just take it one step at a time...



This is a view of ideas at work



#20 Anonymous Poster_Anonymous Poster_*   Guests   -  Reputation:

Likes

Posted 14 January 2002 - 05:10 AM

quote:
Original post by garconbifteck
My conclusion

Computer science = all the computer stuff




All the software and math based stuff.

Hardware design is Computer Engineering. But that''s completely non-programming.






Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS