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Starting up making games


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#1 akakan   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 11 February 2000 - 07:39 AM

I recently started using TGF (the games factory) and i wondered on what people''s opinions are on using it to start off with, until i find the time to learn a programming language. I know it''s not really the sort of thing people here want to talk about, but I have nobody else to ask. Cheers for reading this, and please give me opinions.

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#2 Mathias   Members   -  Reputation: 126

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Posted 11 February 2000 - 11:14 AM

Well i dont think its so good starting off with that kind of program to learn how to make games. Its better starting with a simple programming language like Basic or Pascal before you start with the real c programming.
Why not using tgf:
1. I think its to limited.
2. You dont actually learn so much of game programming.
3. The exe files you get are bigger than if you actually wrote the code you needed all by yourself.
4. Its more fun writing code when you learn it.
5. Graphics like sprite movement ane lot slower than if you code it.
6. Limited to a certain amount of sprites.

But if you only want to make games nothing else you could makeing with tgf. But if you really want to become a game programmer you should start with a simple language like basic and learn the language and then write a small game like pong or tetris or even a tictactoe game as a first game project.


- Mathias

#3 akakan   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 12 February 2000 - 09:33 AM

thanks

#4 Paladin   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 14 February 2000 - 03:30 AM

Please, PLEASE forget Games Factory, it''s not "programming".

The programming is way more than just creating a game or simple calculator, it''s the FEEL that you can do whatever you want to, and the Games Factory doesn''t give that feel at all.

Try programming with Qbasic, thats the elite-language ))
Seriously, create couple of simulators. My first game was simple A B C selection game. Next one was simple hack and slash roleplaying game (with text only). After this I made car game, that used Inkey$ functions (first "realtime game")
After this I made this and that and so on... And then I changed to C++

I would preferr to study basic for half year, and then change to C when you understand concepts of programming. Other opinion is that start studying C++ right away if you feel so, but I didn''t say that it would be easy !

#5 Bully   Members   -  Reputation: 144

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Posted 14 February 2000 - 11:40 PM


I have to agree with Paladin, just forget about using the TFG. Sure if you just want to have a bit of fun with making a couple of very limited games go for it. But if you are really interested in game development I suggest you sell TFG and go buy some programming books.

Hope this helped you

-David

#6 Squidi   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 20 February 2000 - 11:53 AM

Forget Basic. It isn''t much better than the Games Factory. Basic has too many rules that you must unlearn when you start programming new things. To its credit, Visual Basic has been getting closer and closer to being a real language, but it still becomes and hurdle to overcome later.

C/C++ is not a very easy language to learn when you are first starting out. Pointers especially are difficult to grasp. Then you''ve got "features" like the fact that integers are different sizes on different machines, variable modifiers that do different things depending on scope, and the fact that C has no array checking. A slightly stricter language, such as Pascal (do they even make this anymore? I still have a book on Mac Pascal programming), Ada (yuk), or Java (I vote for this one).

Java especially is good because you start out with a completely object orientated language to start out with. You don''t learn traditional programming aspects and then add OOP on top. It is there from the beginning. I think it is very important to begin with OOP because it can be very difficult to adjust to if you''re used to procedural programming.

Personally, I started by learning LPC, a object orientated C derivative used specifically in the creation of lpMUDs.

#7 DavidRM   Members   -  Reputation: 270

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Posted 20 February 2000 - 01:31 PM

I don''t anything about The Games Factory, but I just have to ask: What the hell difference does it make what he uses to create the game?

Maybe I should make fun of all the people who zip along the streets in cars using automatic transmissions. After all, if they don''t learn to actually use a stick shift, they really don''t have a "feel" for when the gears change while they''re accelerating from a stop sign. How *dare* they just press the accelerator to go and the brake to stop? The only *real* way to drive involves a nifty clutch-shift-gas dance. Those automatic transmission driving losers. They just go and stop, go and stop, go and stop. Bums. They don''t understand the *beauty* and *power* of a traffic jam with a stick shift...clutch-in-brake-clutch-out-gas-clutch-in-shift-clutch-in-brake-shift-clutch-out-clutch-in-clutch-out...

Bah.

Programming is programming, and tools are made to be used. If the tool you have will create the game you want, then even if it''s not the *best* tool for the job, it''ll work. And you''ll probably learn something valuable about what you can and can''t do with that tool.

Besides, you have to start *somewhere* doing *something*. If you balk every time you find out that you''re not doing a particular task "The Best Way ™" you''ll never get *anything* done. And just because the path you''re taking isn''t the "Established Path ™" doesn''t mean that it won''t take you where you''re wanting to go.

Do what works for you using the tools that make you the most productive. And don''t waste your time inflating your own ego because your tool is *so* much better than someone else''s. You''re probably wrong, anyway.


DavidRM
Samu Games


#8 ghowland   Members   -  Reputation: 134

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Posted 20 February 2000 - 03:27 PM

Have to agree whole heartedly with David here. Use whatever you can to make whatever you want. And since you SHOULD be starting small, the games factory can probably build a Tetris and side scrolling game and teach you a TON about game making before you pick up a programming language and spend 6 months to 2 years learning how to program well enough to make the same thing.

Dont feel bullied into doing things the "right" way, or the way that everyone else is doing them. If you want advice, first find out who youre getting it FROM. What have THEY accomplished? What are THEIR goals? Are they similar to yours? How long did it take them following their path? Do you want to spend that long to build your first game?

Is this just a hobby for you, if so, you can probably benefit from using premade tools for a while until you run into their limitations. THEN you can worry about how to work beyond that.

Dont overlook the tools that make things easy. Game making software. Visual tools made for simplicity like Visual Basic, Delphi, etc. There are commercial games being made and sold with VB and Delphi daily. Make your own choices based on your own objectives and present situation...

-Geoff


Edited by - ghowland on 2/20/00 9:28:40 PM

#9 joew   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3662

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Posted 20 February 2000 - 10:25 PM

I agree with Geoff. It's not how you make it, it's the finished product that counts.

Edited by - Saruman on 2/21/00 4:26:18 AM




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