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mightypigeon

Member Since 26 Apr 2007
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 03:58 PM

#5176636 Why are their bumps in my shadow mapping?

Posted by mightypigeon on 28 August 2014 - 05:32 AM

The rounded edges are due to your shadow filtering, perhaps try D3D11_FILTER_MIN_MAG_MIP_POINT for your filter.




#5126449 fuzzy fonts

Posted by mightypigeon on 26 January 2014 - 01:50 AM

If you're using bilinear filtering (or any kind of filtering), turn it off and just use nearest/point filtering instead and see if that looks crisper.




#5061176 Simple shadow map antialiasing?

Posted by mightypigeon on 11 May 2013 - 05:34 PM

There was a similar one with a cute name like "fixies", or something, but I can't recall.

 

Smoothies?  More of a soft shadow technique though.  http://people.csail.mit.edu/ericchan/papers/smoothie/




#5038183 Creating a level editor alongside the game, how to apply it?

Posted by mightypigeon on 01 March 2013 - 04:53 PM

My editor uses the game engine.  That way it's more or less WYSIWYG, so what you're working on in the editor will pretty much be what to expect in-game.  It's actually part of the main engine project but abstracted enough it could probably be a separate application and just reference the engine DLL.  I use wxWidgets for the interface.

 

The actual 'game code' is not really referenced at all by the editor (it is in its own DLL), just the renderer is used.  Everything is data driven so game entity definitions are loaded in from the script system which is actually separate from the game code.  (part of the engine).

 

It does make things a bit more difficult, as normally you would have certain objects in different data structures (static objects vs. dynamic objects for example), and since any model can be moved around you need to be able quickly update these in the background.  We also have a fairly complex shadow system so when lights are moved around part of their shadow maps need to be quickly recalculated as well (VSM shadows).  

 

This is easy enough for small scenes but as levels get bigger and more complex you need to be able to do this super quickly so the editing experience is impacted by poor performance or things popping everywhere.

 

There are lots of other things like being able to hot-reload assets in the engine, which means a little bit of extra work on the resource managers, but this gives the added advantage that you can update a texture or model even when in the game without having to open up the editor.

 

The editor code isn't the prettiest (I don't think it ever is...) and is bit of work to get going but definitely worth it in the end.  It's good being able to open the game up to test things out and having it look exactly as expected.

 

Bonus screenshot...

 

62Vn3xh.jpg




#4868263 Radiosity Revised

Posted by mightypigeon on 02 October 2011 - 08:04 AM

No one hates you, it's just that people would much rather have a demo to play with, or some code to go through, or a description of your technique (like you have done this time). These are all much more enjoyable and motivating than watching someone doing programming video tutorials (especially when they weren't planned out). Don't get discouraged because some tough guys on the internet gave you negative reputation ;)


#4806735 Baseball Field For your Game

Posted by mightypigeon on 04 May 2011 - 09:36 PM

Greatly appreciated, thanks.


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