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MirekCerny

Member Since 16 Aug 2007
Offline Last Active Aug 14 2013 04:20 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Pipeline for tesselated character

05 January 2013 - 12:28 PM

To be more specific: 

The (maybe nonworkable) idea is to be able to create a very high-res model in a sculpting application; and a very (as in very,very) coarse base model; and then let the tessellation and displacement do the rest.

 

Of an extremely high res model, from which you generate a normal/displacement map, which you can then apply to a coarse model. The other alternatives would be some form of subdivision scheme (e.g. pnTriangles, or subdivs). Maya/XSI allow you to model subdiv characters, and there are libs available to handle the tessellation (e.g. opensubdiv).

 

That should theoretically drastically shorten the time needed for the actual 3d modeling and rigging.

 

Or is this something the currently available RT tessellation methods are unable to accomplish?

 

It's entirely possible, but don't expect it to shorten the time for rigging & modelling, because it won't.
 

 

 

Ok, I guess that splits to two questions:

1)If there are, say, two characters on the screen - which will result in better visuals:

    - using lowres meshes with tesselation and displacement map

    - or using a hand-made high-res meshes, sans tesselation?

(With the same frame rate, of course)

 

From the stuff I've read and seen, I am still not sure whether the tesselation is only good for dynamic LOD (and as such, the most 'important' objects are still better left un-tesselated).

 

 

2)Why do you think it might not shorten the time for rigging and modeling?

Without tesselation, you need

          - one very high res model to generate normal maps from

          - one high res model to texture,rig and ultimately display

 

 

I though that with the use of tesselation, the second model can be considerably more low-res, and as such, easier to create and rig. Am I missing something?


In Topic: Pipeline for tesselated character

03 January 2013 - 04:51 AM

To be more specific: 

The (maybe nonworkable) idea is to be able to create a very high-res model in a sculpting application; and a very (as in very,very) coarse base model; and then let the tessellation and displacement do the rest.

 

That should theoretically drastically shorten the time needed for the actual 3d modeling and rigging.

 

Or is this something the currently available RT tessellation methods are unable to accomplish?


In Topic: DX10 motion blur

04 March 2012 - 04:45 PM

Even if they did decide they don't need the anisotropic filtering, it still makes no sense to use it to render the scene _when the motion blur is off_ ;-)

Thanks for the paper, I was looking for such information. Yeah it is a bit disappointing - I was hoping that the GS method would allow a real object based motion blur - perhaps using a technique similar to shadow volume generation on the GPU - and now it seems I'm still stuck with the screen based one. Oh well ;-)

In Topic: Paraboloid shadows mapping

11 February 2008 - 03:41 AM

Thanks for answering. Yes, I do the math in VS. I sent you a PM.

In Topic: Cube PSM

17 August 2007 - 12:20 AM

Nope. In CubePSM, the six faces of the cube are rendered NOT from the center of the cube, but from the position of the light, ie. each one from a different distance. That means there is different Znear and Zfar for every face.

See http://http.download.nvidia.com/developer/GPU_Gems/Sample_Chapters/PSMs_Care_and_Feeding.pdf
for details.

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