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booomji

Member Since 27 Aug 2008
Offline Last Active Mar 31 2014 04:40 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Game Programming Online Courses

05 September 2013 - 12:01 AM

Hello,
I feel gameinstitute has the informal-formal structure you are looking for.

www.gameinstitute.com

b

In Topic: Mathbook for dummies, any recomendation?

13 August 2013 - 04:22 AM

If you're into on-line courses, check this one out:
Coding the Matrix: Linear Algebra through Computer Science Applications

While that is a good resource in general, it's not what the op would want to go to immediately.
As suggested, khan academy is fantastic. The op can start at a level he feels comfortable with and the explanations will get the intuition across faster.

betterexplained.com is also a good place to cross reference while at khan.

All the best.

b

In Topic: Free course (MOOC): Interactive 3D Graphics

22 May 2013 - 09:51 AM

Erich Christmas arrived early for me.

 

I thank you and Autodesk profusely for putting this resource out there. It's super useful and digestible for meat heads like me. 

The download links will make the learning very productive.

 

Bravo

 


In Topic: An interesting article about the state of the gaming industry

18 April 2013 - 10:44 AM

 



The work-for-hire model for dev studios is very uncertain. After you finish a title, you need to line up another one ASAP, or otherwise you've got to have huge layoffs until you do find more work. One company I worked for was deliberately making pitches that quoting prices below what they knew it would actually cost, knowingly making a loss on the work, because they didn't want to lay off their staff -- they'd rather lose a little bit of money over a long period, rather than be sitting idle paying everyone's salary with no income.
They thought they were just weathering the storm, trying to stay afloat during a tough time in the industry, but you can see that if all the big developers were doing this, then the littler ones who can't afford to make a loss were just screwed!

There's been quite a big shift recently among smaller developers, with many more trying to work on "original IP" instead of licensed titles. The problem with this model is acquiring the funding to support development, which traditionally was provided by a publisher (just like the work-for-hire model). Seeing how Kickstarter has exploded in the past year though, I'm really hopeful that crowd-funding will allow these smaller devs to independently work on "new IP" without betting their survival on the whims of a publisher.

 

Sounds exactly like my industry. 

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rhythm-hues-bankruptcy-could-affect-421775

 

http://carpetbagger.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/27/the-economics-of-visual-effects/

 

keep an eye on this blog

www.vfxsoldier.com

 

b


In Topic: Do I learn the skills I need then make the game, or do I work on the game, an...

02 March 2013 - 08:45 AM

Both ways "could" lead to the same place but my own experience (through hurt as daaark put it) has got me going back to getting the language and paradigm down over blustering through a game. 

 

So "along" with doing the gameinstitute courses i am religiously following these resources.

 

http://see.stanford.edu/see/lecturelist.aspx?coll=11f4f422-5670-4b4c-889c-008262e09e4e

http://see.stanford.edu/see/courseinfo.aspx?coll=2d712634-2bf1-4b55-9a3a-ca9d470755ee

 

fwiw

 

b


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