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BHXSpecter

Member Since 23 Nov 2008
Offline Last Active Today, 06:11 PM

#5179955 Already ready to start making simple games

Posted by BHXSpecter on 12 September 2014 - 01:46 PM


I did a post Just Starting Out, Which games should I make? which should be useful you now.  It's a list of projects in escalating difficulty that I suggest beginners start with.

To add to that, there is also this article on GDNet http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976




#5179646 C++ college courses vs learning on your own..

Posted by BHXSpecter on 11 September 2014 - 12:18 PM

To add to frob's list I will post my normal list for learning C++:

  • Programming Principles and Practice Using C++ Second Edition by Bjarne Stroustrup
    • Is a book designed to help you learn to program (if you have never programmed before) using C++ as a tool. It is also the intro course book for several degrees at Texas A&M University. Not to mention it is written by Bjarne Stroustrup himself.
  • C++ Primer Fifth Edition by Stanley B. Lippman, Josee Lajoie, Barbara E. Moo
    • The usual recommendation for Beginner C++, but that phrase is a little misleading. It isn't a book for someone who as never programmed, but rather a book for a programmer who is experienced in another language and looking to learn C++ now. It covers C++ more in-depth.
  • The C++ Standard Library Second Edition A Tutorial and Reference by Nicolai M. Josuttis

    • Covers the standard library in-depth. 
  • The C++ Programming Language Fourth Edition by Bjarne Stroustrup

    • I recommend this purely as a reference book. It too is written by Bjarne Stroustrup. You can certainly read it cover to cover if you like, but it makes a better reference than a book about learning due to its technical nature.




#5179640 Did I begin learning late?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 11 September 2014 - 12:06 PM

why down votes ?!

As LennyLen pointed out, it is more than likely due to your constant fixation on stating that you want to be better than someone. I've been programming in some form for 20 years now and I would be willing to bet that LennyLen and many others on here are better than me at programming and that is fine because I enjoy programming and don't feel it is a competition to be better than anyone else. As I stated in my other post, you are making it clear that you are wanting to learn for all the wrong reasons. I started learning C++ because I wanted to make video games not to be better than someone else. The same is true for every language I've learned and am learning (C, C#, Java, Javascript, Ada, Pascal, COBOL, Fortran, etc.) I am learning them because I want to learn them and not due to a petty thing like being better than someone that uses them.

 

Learn them and stop worrying about being better than someone else. 




#5179262 C++ starter

Posted by BHXSpecter on 10 September 2014 - 02:09 AM

For learning the language I always recommend the same books in the same order:

1) Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++ 2nd Edition by Bjarne Stroustrup
 Is a book designed to help you learn to program (if you have never programmed before) using C++ as a tool. It is also the intro course book for several degrees at Texas A&M University. Not to mention it is written by Bjarne Stroustrup himself.
2) C++ Primer 5th Edition by Stanley B. Lippman, Josee Lajoie, Barbara E. Moo
 The usual recommendation for Beginner C++, but that phrase is a little misleading. It isn't a book for someone who as never programmed, but rather a book for a programmer who is experienced in another language and looking to learn C++ now. It covers C++ more in-depth.
3) The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference by Nicolai M. Josuttis
 Covers the standard library in-depth. 
4) The C++ Programming Language (as a reference) by Bjarne Stroustrup
I recommend this purely as a reference book. It too is written by Bjarne Stroustrup. You can certainly read it cover to cover if you like, but it makes a better reference than a book about learning due to its technical nature. 

 

Can't hurt to also invest in SFML Game Development by Artur Moreira, Jan Haller, and Henrik Vogelius Hansson while you are at it.




#5178392 GOTO, why are you adverse to using it

Posted by BHXSpecter on 05 September 2014 - 02:35 PM

Let's not forget that goto fail; happened.

Well that doesn't show why goto is bad, but rather why you should use {} with if statements every time (which I admit, if I'm only printing out one thing I don't use {}).




#5177973 Did I begin learning late?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 03 September 2014 - 10:36 PM

i mean i want to learn python & web languages & Networking,,,not python only 

i want to be professional and be better than who make fun of me and told me i don't know anything 

Careful, you should only learn anything because it interests you and is fun for you. If you learn it to prove someone wrong then you may not pay attention enough to actually learn it properly. Forget what small people think of you and learn it because you want to not because you want to prove your intelligence. I've been programming for ~20 years and continually run into people demanding proof, but the key is that I don't let their doubt control my personal view or what I know is the truth. If you want to learn python, web languages, and networking; then learn them, but for yourself and not because of someone else.




#5177774 Beginners Observation: Fundamental Lack of Source Code Examples?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 02 September 2014 - 07:23 PM

Most programmers rely on pseudo-code to express concepts rather than actual code for the simple fact that concepts usually are universal. Once you wrap your head around the concept or method expressed in the pseudo-code then it is a matter of using a library to do what it says. In my opinion, pseudo-code makes you think more about what you are doing than just reading through the code trying to understand the examples.




#5177585 Did I begin learning late?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 01 September 2014 - 11:25 PM

I was in college with a guy that was in his 40s learning to program. I don't think there is really a limit to learning programming. Just pick a language, pick a book or tutorial, and get to learning. Practice every chance you get and never stop pushing yourself.




#5176113 Missile Command code review request

Posted by BHXSpecter on 25 August 2014 - 07:44 PM


I figured that, but I thought Visual Studio somehow did it differently. Suppose not.

You were right, from what I remember of VS and most other robust IDEs. If you edit, like Lactose! pointed out, a header file, then usually the IDE will recompile all files that include it, but there are some IDEs that will recompile everything. That said, it usually is a better idea to do a fresh rebuild of all files every once in awhile, just to be on the safe side.




#5175856 Suggestions in Finding an Interesting Game Ideas

Posted by BHXSpecter on 24 August 2014 - 01:23 PM

I partially agree with Metalbreath on this. 

 

 


*Better check what the players like more than what you like. You should do what you HAVE to, not what you WANT to

This I don't agree with. I believe you should make games you enjoy, if you don't enjoy them then how else will another player like it? I believe every game developer should make games they would enjoy playing and want to play. Gamers know, to some extent, what they want, but even then you have to take it with a grain of salt. For example, my nephew is a gamer, but he thinks every game (like Skyrim, Minecraft, Demon's Soul, Mario Bros., etc.) should have a M4A1 Carbine as a weapon choice (can't tell he likes Call of Duty or Battlefield can you?).

 

 


*Community is a powerful tool. treat them well and they will worship you. They will defend you and they will bring more people to the community. Treat them bad and they will dig your grave (Take FEZ for example). 

That is true, a game and/or its creator can suffer, but in the case of FEZ the game didn't suffer any. Every review I've seen of FEZ (mind you this is after its release) has been mostly positive, but every opinion of its creator Fish, has been negative (can't blame them though as I follow the guy on Twitter and he spends his entire day bashing gamers and the industry). 

 

Your challenge as a game developer is to find that perfect balance. You HAVE to make a game you will like (otherwise you will get bored with it fast and likely never finish it), but as pointed out, you HAVE to listen to your target audience and try to incorporate the ideas they offer (assuming it fits your game, as you don't want to put a M4A1 into a 1800-era puzzler). The key is being able to turn any idea into a game idea (and that takes time). Just keep your mind open and you will be surprised at what gives you game ideas.




#5172393 Good step-by-step development tutorials/books

Posted by BHXSpecter on 08 August 2014 - 07:52 PM

The issue I have with step-by-step tutorials is that they don't usually promote the programmer taking time to understand it, but rather encourages them to take shortcuts and simply copy and paste the code to get the game done. This leaves them running into the same issue until they stop and try to figure it out themselves or get guidance from another programmer who won't give them the answer right off. That is just my personal opinion on them though.




#5171549 Where should I start? (2D Game Programming)

Posted by BHXSpecter on 04 August 2014 - 09:06 PM

 


The easiest way to use MySQL from C++ is probably through the connector

 

I've tried the connector countless times in the past, all I get is errors. Then when I ask for help, people just point to the documentation, and tell me to read it. I don't have time to read the documentation. I read it anyways, and it was still a waste of time because I never got my problem solved.

 

You want to take a wild guess how I learned what I know? How about how the professionals learn to use their APIs and compile against them? They don't have a 24/7 hotline to walk them through learning it all, they have to read the documentation. If you don't have time to read documentation then you don't have time to write code.




#5171009 Beginner C++ Programmer--Where to?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 01 August 2014 - 06:58 PM

Very new as well:

 

I too, have a basic understanding of c++, and I still have issues when things get more complicated (lists, connecting to lists and such). 

 

I learned all of my C++ over at codeacademy.com

As pointed out, codeacademy.com does not have a C++ course. They have HTML & CSS, Ruby, Python, PHP, Javascript, and jQuery (I finished their tutorials 10 months ago according to their site). Then you go to projects to use what you learned and to learn other APIs for Twitter and such.

 

 

Hello

I am a new C++ programmer with a basic comprehension of simple C++. If anyone could provide any C++ guides/tutorials for a beginning game programmer, I would be very thankful. I already have a partner who can animate, and we have a game idea. Where should I start looking for a C++ FPS tutorial for beginners?

As pointed out, knowing basics doesn't make you ready for an FPS. You need to start small and work your way to an FPS. I recommend reading this article:

 

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976

 

It covers the games you should start with to become experienced before jumping in head first like you are wanting to do. We are not saying you can't start with FPS, but you should start simple before tackling too much.




#5169651 Hiring people to create a game for you

Posted by BHXSpecter on 27 July 2014 - 08:53 PM


Huh? "hot or not" clone?

It was a site where people posted pics of themselves and the other members voted 1 to 10 on if they thought the person was hot or not. If a person paid to be a premium member they could message the users (so in that regard it was a dating site clone too). My wife and I were moderators of it for a while, approving pics and downvoting them if they were nude or inappropriate. I stopped even taking part in the site when they started allowing premium members to load nude pics.


So it's basically:

play = idea
work = implementation

-> All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.
-> All play and no work makes Jack a mere toy.

Right?

What?! o.O;

Some say if you are in a job you truly love and enjoy everyday is play even days you are armpit deep in work.


Just like an article I saw on cracked.com on "7 game ideas that will never become reality" or something similar.

You mean this one: http://www.cracked.com/blog/the-7-best-ideas-video-games-that-will-never-get-made/


To be honest, the only thing you should be asking yourself right now is whether or not you have a few hundred thousand dollars (at least) lying around.  I say this because nobody in their right mind is going to get involved with this project unless they're paid in advance.
 
You clearly have no idea what is required to make a successful game, so you can't provide any assurances that you aren't signing people up for a doomed project.

I agree with you 100% LennyLen and while I want nothing to do with the project, we both know too well that I've never been of my right mind <awkward maniacal laugh>.

 

Jokes aside, these guys are right. Without a large amount of finance and some major industry cred you won't likely find any experienced person to take up your project.




#5164832 Is there any point to releasing on Ouya, Windows Phone or XBLI?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 04 July 2014 - 08:40 PM

Honestly, no matter how 'grim' a platform looks, releasing on them gives you a very important thing. It actually gives you two important things. 

1) Exposure. You are getting your games out to gamers and hopefully getting useful feedback other than "this sucks because I don't like it". 

2) You are gaining experience (whether it be programming, porting, team management, artist, sound, etc.).

 

To me, those two things far outweigh any amount of money because those two things look good on resumes.






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