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BHXSpecter

Member Since 23 Nov 2008
Offline Last Active Today, 03:41 AM

#5203733 how make games in c++

Posted by BHXSpecter on 12 January 2015 - 01:27 PM

The problem that you risk running into with YouTube tutorials, well any tutorial really, is that if the creator has flawed programming knowledge, practices, or terminology then they will be teaching that flawed knowledge to future programmers. You have to be extremely careful on what you learn from...Just because you can find YouTube tutorials so easily doesn't mean they are professional quality or professionally accurate. It is better to learn a language well. In the case of C++, it is best to read C++ Primer (not to be confused with C++ Primer Plus) then pick a library like Allegro, SDL, or SFML (for 2D) and make parts of games while learning it. Of course always ask questions here and seek advice and show code as you go.




#5195102 laptop for programming

Posted by BHXSpecter on 27 November 2014 - 10:24 PM

Yes, it depends on the user. For example, I still use my 2006 Compaq Presario C700 series laptop for my programming, using a Linux OS now, but still works for my hobbyist needs. 




#5194073 Proper C++ header file?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 21 November 2014 - 09:23 PM

Its not portable because it's not part of the ISO/IEC standard. However MSVC, GCC, CLANG, Intel Compiler, and many other support it. Dunno why it is still not part of the standard, probably some member of the committee do not support it (maybe IBM XL C/C++ compier?)

 

It's not portable because even though the compilers support it, there is no guarantee that they all function the same between compilers. Header guards are guaranteed to function the same on every system thanks to the standard. They won't add it to the standard because the modules are supposed to guarantee what #pragma once alleges it will do.

 


The proposals now being experimented with so not replace header files, but
guarantee that a header is compiled once and minimize the inter-header
dependencies. Basically, headers become (just) interface specifications
and macros are mostly eliminated from them.




#5194009 Proper C++ header file?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 21 November 2014 - 01:12 PM

I asked a very reliable source (Bjarne Stroustrup via email [Got PM asking me to cite "reliable source"]) for his view of #pragma once. His reply was:

 

 

It's a useful hack. I would have supported it had I not know that serious
work is being done on modules. It is not portable.

Sounds like it is better to do a little more typing and simply do:

#ifndef HEADER_FILENAME_H
#define HEADER_FILENAME_H

// ... code ...

#endif // HEADER_FILENAME_H



#5193894 Proper C++ header file?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 20 November 2014 - 07:43 PM

I was fixing to ask, isn't #pragma once compiler vendor implementation so there is no guarantee they are implemented the same or function the same?




#5190083 Creating a Grand Theft Auto type of Game in Delphi.

Posted by BHXSpecter on 29 October 2014 - 11:08 PM


Lets see, GTA-sized game, with 5 people... 30 years? Maybe more?

Let's do this another way.....not even get into a 3D game like GTA. Let's look at Elysian Shadows, a 2D RPG that has been in development for several years and just now coming close to release and had been restarted and retooled at least a dozen times. You throw in 3D and a game even larger like GTA and 30 years for an experienced team is being generous.




#5180628 Simple 2D lighting effects

Posted by BHXSpecter on 16 September 2014 - 12:38 AM

I don't know about DirectX, but I know one method I see recommended a lot is to make a screen sized bitmap that has alpha transparency with the circle in the middle and a custom made gradient filling from the edge of the circle to the edge of the bitmap. Then it is a simple matter of drawing it over the top of the sprites being drawn. That is if I'm understanding what you are wanting. There are probably better ways to go about it, but like I said, that is the normal method I see recommended, but I've never done this for a game myself so I can't say from experience.

 

I should point out this method also assumes you have the camera locked so that the character is always dead center of the screen.




#5179955 Already ready to start making simple games

Posted by BHXSpecter on 12 September 2014 - 01:46 PM


I did a post Just Starting Out, Which games should I make? which should be useful you now.  It's a list of projects in escalating difficulty that I suggest beginners start with.

To add to that, there is also this article on GDNet http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976




#5179646 C++ college courses vs learning on your own..

Posted by BHXSpecter on 11 September 2014 - 12:18 PM

To add to frob's list I will post my normal list for learning C++:

  • Programming Principles and Practice Using C++ Second Edition by Bjarne Stroustrup
    • Is a book designed to help you learn to program (if you have never programmed before) using C++ as a tool. It is also the intro course book for several degrees at Texas A&M University. Not to mention it is written by Bjarne Stroustrup himself.
  • C++ Primer Fifth Edition by Stanley B. Lippman, Josee Lajoie, Barbara E. Moo
    • The usual recommendation for Beginner C++, but that phrase is a little misleading. It isn't a book for someone who as never programmed, but rather a book for a programmer who is experienced in another language and looking to learn C++ now. It covers C++ more in-depth.
  • The C++ Standard Library Second Edition A Tutorial and Reference by Nicolai M. Josuttis

    • Covers the standard library in-depth. 
  • The C++ Programming Language Fourth Edition by Bjarne Stroustrup

    • I recommend this purely as a reference book. It too is written by Bjarne Stroustrup. You can certainly read it cover to cover if you like, but it makes a better reference than a book about learning due to its technical nature.




#5179640 Did I begin learning late?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 11 September 2014 - 12:06 PM

why down votes ?!

As LennyLen pointed out, it is more than likely due to your constant fixation on stating that you want to be better than someone. I've been programming in some form for 20 years now and I would be willing to bet that LennyLen and many others on here are better than me at programming and that is fine because I enjoy programming and don't feel it is a competition to be better than anyone else. As I stated in my other post, you are making it clear that you are wanting to learn for all the wrong reasons. I started learning C++ because I wanted to make video games not to be better than someone else. The same is true for every language I've learned and am learning (C, C#, Java, Javascript, Ada, Pascal, COBOL, Fortran, etc.) I am learning them because I want to learn them and not due to a petty thing like being better than someone that uses them.

 

Learn them and stop worrying about being better than someone else. 




#5179262 C++ starter

Posted by BHXSpecter on 10 September 2014 - 02:09 AM

For learning the language I always recommend the same books in the same order:

1) Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++ 2nd Edition by Bjarne Stroustrup
 Is a book designed to help you learn to program (if you have never programmed before) using C++ as a tool. It is also the intro course book for several degrees at Texas A&M University. Not to mention it is written by Bjarne Stroustrup himself.
2) C++ Primer 5th Edition by Stanley B. Lippman, Josee Lajoie, Barbara E. Moo
 The usual recommendation for Beginner C++, but that phrase is a little misleading. It isn't a book for someone who as never programmed, but rather a book for a programmer who is experienced in another language and looking to learn C++ now. It covers C++ more in-depth.
3) The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference by Nicolai M. Josuttis
 Covers the standard library in-depth. 
4) The C++ Programming Language (as a reference) by Bjarne Stroustrup
I recommend this purely as a reference book. It too is written by Bjarne Stroustrup. You can certainly read it cover to cover if you like, but it makes a better reference than a book about learning due to its technical nature. 

 

Can't hurt to also invest in SFML Game Development by Artur Moreira, Jan Haller, and Henrik Vogelius Hansson while you are at it.




#5178392 GOTO, why are you adverse to using it

Posted by BHXSpecter on 05 September 2014 - 02:35 PM

Let's not forget that goto fail; happened.

Well that doesn't show why goto is bad, but rather why you should use {} with if statements every time (which I admit, if I'm only printing out one thing I don't use {}).




#5177973 Did I begin learning late?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 03 September 2014 - 10:36 PM

i mean i want to learn python & web languages & Networking,,,not python only 

i want to be professional and be better than who make fun of me and told me i don't know anything 

Careful, you should only learn anything because it interests you and is fun for you. If you learn it to prove someone wrong then you may not pay attention enough to actually learn it properly. Forget what small people think of you and learn it because you want to not because you want to prove your intelligence. I've been programming for ~20 years and continually run into people demanding proof, but the key is that I don't let their doubt control my personal view or what I know is the truth. If you want to learn python, web languages, and networking; then learn them, but for yourself and not because of someone else.




#5177774 Beginners Observation: Fundamental Lack of Source Code Examples?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 02 September 2014 - 07:23 PM

Most programmers rely on pseudo-code to express concepts rather than actual code for the simple fact that concepts usually are universal. Once you wrap your head around the concept or method expressed in the pseudo-code then it is a matter of using a library to do what it says. In my opinion, pseudo-code makes you think more about what you are doing than just reading through the code trying to understand the examples.




#5177585 Did I begin learning late?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 01 September 2014 - 11:25 PM

I was in college with a guy that was in his 40s learning to program. I don't think there is really a limit to learning programming. Just pick a language, pick a book or tutorial, and get to learning. Practice every chance you get and never stop pushing yourself.






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