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BHXSpecter

Member Since 23 Nov 2008
Offline Last Active Today, 08:24 PM

#5288822 Where to learn 2D Math for game dev

Posted by BHXSpecter on 26 April 2016 - 03:21 PM

There are a lot of books about the matter also. This book is the one I used in my college course: Fundamentals of Math and Physics for Game Programmers by Wendy Stahler.

Yes, I know you asked for 2D, but I'm going to add this in case you move to 3D for any reason.

There is also 3D Math Primer for Graphics and Game Development by Fletcher Dunn; again; in case you are interested in 3D. 

There are other books as well, but I've not read any of them to be able to recommend any other book.




#5288514 My understanding for developing a video game, can I get some insight?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 24 April 2016 - 07:21 PM

I hadn't read all that post due to the way he started it as I had assumed it was him, yet again, probing at the OP for a response. I stand corrected, my apologies.




#5288510 My understanding for developing a video game, can I get some insight?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 24 April 2016 - 06:50 PM

A person can be self reliable and still ask questions so I disagree with the "ask less questions". You also haven't answered my clarification question about the book you named. You have spent the thread arguing with the OP.

 

 
 ( and I still think you are lazy and all talk-no action, and you still haven't started to make your first 3d game   :lol:  )

Absolutely uncalled for and rather childish to put. There is a level of civility and professionalism expected in the beginners forum. 




#5288362 My understanding for developing a video game, can I get some insight?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 23 April 2016 - 06:18 PM

Read some books, for example  "3D Math for Graphics and Game Development". The first 8 chapters are all about that "world of yours".

Are you referring to the Fletcher Dunn book or another one? That is one problem, every programmer and developer has their own set of books they like so it is rather difficult to know which books to read. 

 

I'm asking for clarification due to books having similar names or identical names yet different authors. Don't want current and future readers of this thread to rush out and buy the wrong book. I'm drawing from the experiences of beginners in C++ being told to buy C++ Primer only to rush out and buy C++ Primer Plus (which is notorious for being poorly written). 




#5288339 My understanding for developing a video game, can I get some insight?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 23 April 2016 - 01:14 PM

 

I don't mean to be rude , but what is the difference? Im sure there is and im curious. Is development the general project and design is specifically related to an actual project and its "design"

 

 

The names imply the differences. Game design is where you sit down and decide what will be in the game, how the game will be played, what levels will look like, what characters will look like, etc. Development is the process of turning the design stage into the actual game. 




#5287339 How did you learn making games?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 17 April 2016 - 12:55 PM

What was the language you used for for first?
BASIC then moved straight to C++. Since have dabbled in other languages. 
How much time did it take to learn the language? (When were you able to do on your own, a game)
I've been programming since I was 13 (2 years BASIC due to school), but started in on C++ when I was 15. I'm now 35 and still learning it as the standard updates add new things for me to play with. After a year you should be more than comfortable to start making games like the ones listed in this article.
Have you uploaded the game to somewhere (like gamejolt)
Nope. 
Do you think it was a good game? Was it succesfull when you showed it to your family/friends
Outside of a basic Pong Clone I wrote using C++ and Allegro I have not publicly released anything I've done since 2006. I do what I do for myself so I don't have the need to publish any of it. 
Are you still making games? And if you, can you feel that, you make progress in game making?

Yes. You only make progress by pushing yourself, once you stop experimenting with ideas and settle into doing the "safe projects" is when you stop progressing. Think of Call of Duty, every sequel has felt like the previous game with just one or two features added. 




#5285956 Is it good practice for game development to learn multiple languages?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 08 April 2016 - 10:52 PM

 

Is it good practice for game development to learn multiple languages?


It is important for ALL programmers to learn multiple languages. They each have different idioms, strengths, and weaknesses. Even if you never _actually_ use a language, learning about that language and how it solves certain problems makes you an all-around _better programmer_. e.g. I never use Ruby myself, for instance, but having spent some time learning it I've learned some new tricks about DSL design and library design in C++ for improving DSLs, as well as having been able to speak competently and authoritatively to external Ruby developers.

Modern games are often also typically written in a variety of languages. Our project's engine, tools, and backend services are written with a combination of _at least_ C++, C#, Python, Lua, ActionScript, Java, Perl, Ruby, and Erlang, and that doesn't even include our build system which uses a mixture including _at least_ CMake, POSIX shell, PowerShell, Python 3, cmd.exe batch, PHP, and SQL.

This is basically just another version of the adage, "if all you have is a hammer then every problem looks like a nail." Languages are just tools. Learn how to use as many of them as you can, and then select the appropriate tools for the correct jobs. A good rule of thumb is to try to competently learn at least one new language every year (you don't need to master them, just become comfortable reading and maintaining small projects written with them).

So learn Python for making your game. Also make a C++ game. Use Unity and C#. Make a Java game. Put together a website for your games in PHP/SQL/HTML/CSS/JavaScript. Learn as much as you can, and never ever stop.

 

I was going to reply with a long rant about how it is absolutely a great thing to learn multiple languages, but then read Sean's post and felt he stated my rant in fewer words. 




#5283225 Should I give up?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 24 March 2016 - 01:39 PM

I've been there about 11 years ago. Just because we program or develop games (or any other type of software) doesn't mean we are an authority on who can and can't develop games. We also can't tell you if you should give up or not because that is something that only you can decide. Anything worth doing is always hard at first. Just keep at it until you get it or until you decide yourself that it isn't something you want to do anymore. Ultimately, you shouldn't run your life, passions, or hobbies based off the opinions or views of others because they aren't you and don't know what you are capable of; so just keep at it.




#5279973 Is Programming an RTS Game still good?

Posted by BHXSpecter on 07 March 2016 - 02:17 AM

Only thing you have to worry about with old books is faded text. Any book that teaches you something is always worth reading and working out of. The only time I would recommend being picky is for a book trying to teach a language, otherwise books, both good and bad, can teach you something about game development.




#5279972 For beginners

Posted by BHXSpecter on 07 March 2016 - 02:15 AM

Just to add to this, this is a rather helpful article to read for getting your path laid out. http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976




#5276646 Game Dev.

Posted by BHXSpecter on 18 February 2016 - 01:07 PM

The best programing language for games and realtime software is C/C++, but i think that you can need other language if you want use an engine as unity, in this case you need know javascript or c#, if you want to use Unreal Engine you would need to know UnrealScript or C++. In a personal view point, i think that you need to know C/C++ is a good base to begin in videogames development, because there are other languages as java or c# with a sintax like C and that can help you to learn it quicly.

Learning languages like Java or C# makes it easier to learn C++. C++ is a rather complex language that can be difficult and depression inducing to try and learn for some beginners. There are engines that use other languages to learn game development so you don't have to be locked into C++.




#5275848 Game Dev.

Posted by BHXSpecter on 15 February 2016 - 10:26 PM

"perfect language"? Doesn't exist as each language has their own set of pros and cons. Languages that can do 2D and 3D? C, C++, C#, and Java (with the help of libraries like SDL, SFML, OpenGL, or Allegro). Engines to use for making your work slightly easier? Unity (C#) and Unreal (C++) are popular choices. Just starting out? Pick a language and then make games off this list of games to get some experience in using the language and making games. Don't get stressed, it takes a long time to be comfortable with any language, but it is doable. 

 

List for easy access:

 

 

  • Pong = Simple: input, physics, collision detection, sound; scoring
  • Worm = Placement of random powerups, handling of screen boundaries, worm data structure
  • Breakout = Lessons of pong, powerups, maps (brick arrangements)
  • Missile Command = targeting; simple enemy ai, movement, and sound
  • Space Invaders = simple movement for player and enemy, very similar to breakout with the exception that the enemy constantly moves downward, simple sound
  • Asteroids = asteroids (enemies) and player can move in all directions, asteroids appear and move randomly, simple sound
  • Tetris = block design, clearing the lines, scoring, simple animation
  • Pac Man = simple animation, input, collision detection, maps (level design), ai
  • Ikari Warriors = top down view, enemy ai, powerups, scoring, collision detection, maps (level design), input, sound, boss ai
  • Super Mario Bros = lessons of Ikari Warriors (except with side-view instead of top-down view), acceleration, jumping, platforms



#5275551 I want to create a website with a few games

Posted by BHXSpecter on 13 February 2016 - 10:07 AM

HTML5 is also a valid choice with Javascript. BrowserQuest is HTML5 with WebSockets I believe. 




#5272874 Online RPG Game Programming

Posted by BHXSpecter on 27 January 2016 - 02:25 PM


Instead of responding to the actual question though, every response took the acronym MMO and ran with it, as though he/she had asked how to make the next WoW or EQ.

No what every one ran with was his line:


The thing is that I want to develop an MMORPG with 2D graphics

 

I work under the assumption that the person asking the question is an absolute beginner. He stated he knew Java, but that doesn't tell his level of understanding or the things he has done in Java. He even states he has never made a game before. You're right, impossible is a bad term as nothing is impossible, however it is improbable. If it is just him then to make a 2D MMORPG, then again I say they were being 100% honest.

 

I never said the tools were harmful. I said just listing tools was harmful as you are assuming the OP will get direction of what to do for his ultimate goal (an 2D MMORPG) just from a list of tools. 




#5272840 Online RPG Game Programming

Posted by BHXSpecter on 27 January 2016 - 10:04 AM


Frankly, the negative responses here are disturbing

When did honesty become negative? 

 

When someone hears MMO they think World of Warcraft, Final Fantasy, and other massive games like that. I know the making a 2D RPG is possible as I watched Allegro users make mini 2D RPGs off and on while I was at the site. I've also seen people make small online games where it is from 2 -16 multiplayer which isn't MMO. Then you get into whether the online play will be PvP or Co-op like Guild Wars. They are just being honest with him. 

 

To me, just listing tools for him is the equivalent of giving him the rope to hang himself. He would need to have someone that focuses only on the server/client code to battle anything that comes up. He would have to pay a hefty sum for a dedicated server, but that usually includes people that make sure the server stays up. Haven't even gotten into the marketing of it, as no one aims to make a MMORPG and leave it up to word of mouth to promote it (also pricey). 

 

Is what he wants doable? Sure with a small team, but it will be a very big and serious challenge. Are the replies negative? Nope, they are just telling him the truth about planning to make an MMORPG be it 2D or 3D. 

 

Comparing making games with an engine by challenged individuals to a project of making a MMORPG is also on the ridiculous side, in my opinion.






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