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Ed Welch

Member Since 08 Jun 2009
Offline Last Active Sep 11 2014 10:51 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: COLLADA vs FBX... Are They Worthwhile for Generic Model Formats?

03 September 2014 - 09:07 AM

 

 

These are just some of the reasons we created the Open Game Engine Exchange format (OpenGEX):
http://opengex.org/

Interesting. Can you save the file as binary? That would be an important feature.
For an interchange format it's not really that important -- games don't use Collada/FBX/ogex files directly, so they don't have to be optimized for loading. You should always convert from your interchange formats to a binary format that's optimal for your specific engine.

It might be interesting for OpenGEX to additionally define a game-ready binary format that's useful for 90% of devs though smile.png

When I started using Collada I was worried about simple 1MB models being stored as 60MB of text/xml... But it seems to work fine as all the decent repository systems compress text files before storage/sync anyway.

 

It slows down the art pipeline. At critical parts of the project your going to be exporting huge scene into your world editor, maybe 100's of times a day.


In Topic: COLLADA vs FBX... Are They Worthwhile for Generic Model Formats?

02 September 2014 - 05:20 PM

These are just some of the reasons we created the Open Game Engine Exchange format (OpenGEX):

 

http://opengex.org/

Interesting. Can you save the file as binary? That would be an important feature.


In Topic: Metal API .... whait what

04 June 2014 - 03:17 PM


Your comments pretty much come across as 'not everyone can use it, why bother?' which is a dumb position to take because if we took that approach we'd never advance and we'd still be sat in a cave somewhere hoping a tiger isn't going to eat us in the night..

 

No, I did not say that at all. Mobile games have to make money and mobile developers typically have less resources. So, it's easy to see when it comes to the crunch that features that do not generate revenue will be cut.


In Topic: Metal API .... whait what

04 June 2014 - 03:00 PM

 


OpenGL ES 3.0 has been available for more than a year, yet there are no commercial games for it

Where do you get that idea? Every game built with Unity or Unreal Engine within the last year have used OpenGL ES 3.0.

 

It's not like supporting these things requires a clean slate. Take a look at Unity's OpenGL ES 3 release notes some time - you get nicer looking shadows on an ES 3 device, better texture filtering, etc.

 

And keep in mind that these engines already dynamically scale the quality of graphics effects at runtime to support devices as old as the iPhone 3G. Adding a new, higher quality configuration requires very little work from their customers - that's one of the primary reasons to use an off-the-shelf game engine...

 

Do you have any links?


In Topic: Metal API .... whait what

04 June 2014 - 01:36 PM

 

Well, they would have to fall back to OpenGL ES for devices that don't support it. Even the iPhone 5c doesn't support metal and that is a device still being sold


Yes, of course, in the same way they use the platform specific APIs on other platforms; my point was this isn't a "announced, games might start using it later" but a case of if you are using any of those engines (which is common, certainly in the Unity case) then a recompile will get you Metal support so it won't be "years" like you asserted.

Even for small teams it might be possible to get on it quickly as the general feedback coming from those who have done it has been that it's pretty quick/easy to get things going with it.

 

I think there's far more work than just a recompile. You're going to have to contend with bugs from 2 different APIs. And what is the benefit, anyway? None, because you assets are made for the OpenGL ES lowest common denominator. You have the fast API only available on devices that are already fast.

Look at it another way. OpenGL ES 3.0 has been available for more than a year, yet there are no commercial games for it


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