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Jarwulf

Member Since 26 Aug 2009
Offline Last Active Jul 18 2014 11:56 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: <o> Is the "STEM Shortage" a myth in The USA ? <o>

18 July 2014 - 02:37 PM

I think it's possible that the term "STEM" obfuscates the problem.  I don't believe believe there are any shortages in the maths and sciences.  There's not a lot of science graduates in the school I graduated from to be sure, but there wasn't exactly a lot of demand for them either.  Engineering is a wash -- it really depends on the discipline.  Comp Sci guys though are in high demand -- basically every CS grad from my uni had job offers before they graduated, and it's not a prestigious school or hi-tech hotspot.

 

 

The only people who believe theres a shortage of 'STEM' workers are the guys that don't work there. Sure there are 'STEM' fields where you can more easily get a job than other industries ie CompSci vs Renaissance Studies. But its nowhere near the golden fields of opportunity fallow of workers the politicians and ceos like to whine about. Even CompSci has severe challenges of outsourcing, overwork, and stability while many other disciplines like BioSci are overcrowded with Medschool washouts and is 50% forsaken grad students/postdocs toiling on the plantation. We could argue that we need science till the cows come home but the fact remains that society does a lot to pump up STEM at school but virtually abandons students by the time they graduate. At least with Humanities you don't have the talking heads pushing disinterested women, minorities, and h1bs into an already saturated market at the same time.


In Topic: Genetic algorithm in a game

16 December 2013 - 06:35 PM

 

 

Hey,

 

I have to make a project for university - a game using A*, genetic algorithm and if possible some kind of a 'building a strategy' algorithm for the enemies. I can come up with ideas about using A*, but I am not sure how can I implement a genetic algorithm in a game. Can you tell me a popular games using genetic algorithm in their implementation and what is the purpose, so I can get the idea of how to use it in my project.

 

Thanks

 

What sort of genetic algorithm? What do you want to evolve? In the somewhat literal sense the creatures series has simplified genetics. I'm not sure how A* which is primarily used for pathfinding would fit into this.

 

My idea is to create a 2d game in which the human player will have to reach a destination, but there will be some obstacles and some computer bots that will try to hunt and catch you. And now i am thinking of how to make the bots learn from their experience or include some sort of genetic algorithm 

 

 

 

random small changes. highest score for capture. Probably should make the player automated too unless you want to manually 'evolve' your bots.


In Topic: Genetic algorithm in a game

16 December 2013 - 05:47 PM

Hey,

 

I have to make a project for university - a game using A*, genetic algorithm and if possible some kind of a 'building a strategy' algorithm for the enemies. I can come up with ideas about using A*, but I am not sure how can I implement a genetic algorithm in a game. Can you tell me a popular games using genetic algorithm in their implementation and what is the purpose, so I can get the idea of how to use it in my project.

 

Thanks

 

What sort of genetic algorithm? What do you want to evolve? In the somewhat literal sense the creatures series has simplified genetics. I'm not sure how A* which is primarily used for pathfinding would fit into this. I suppose you could have entities which start out using A* and then see if you can select for more effective pathfinding by making the algorithm mutatable.


In Topic: Art and Programmers

11 August 2013 - 06:48 PM

I have a question for art professionals who have a lot of experience in the industry. Preferably someone who's done 2D and 3D. Now I understand that for every person it's probably different, but I'd love to hear everyone's opinion.

 

My question is, what do you think a programmer with ZERO art skills could create higher quality art for in a smaller amount of time for, 2D or 3D? For the last month in my free time I have been randomly messing around in Illustrator and 3ds Max. With the help of tutorials I have managed to do the basics of both worlds. In Illustrator I managed to create a few decent 'sketches' of random monsters, while in 3ds I managed to make a decent human quite easily surprisingly. There are two things I'm afraid of:

- Animation. I think spritesheets are more complicated than people think? Although 2D skeletal programs seem like they might be able to help a little. In 3d it seems like animation would be a little easier. I'm talking about someone who has never really drawn in his life or ever done anything art related here. What do you guys think?

 

- Coloring. This seems harder than the drawing almost. I've only been doing the basics of drawing and have absolutely no idea how people make those awesome colorings in 2D art. I was looking at Nekro's concept art and it looks so amazing. I love their art. What do you guys about this? I'm guessing for models you use a program like Z-Brush or whatever it's called and pretty much paint a 3D figurine kinda thing? What are your takes and difficulties on coloring for 2D and 3D?

 

Pros and cons to both would be great. In the near future I plan on taking a whole month just to focus on learning 2D or 3D art. I understand this won't get me to AAA level, but I'd like to be able to make a few awesome high quality monsters as long as I stick to it. I surprisingly like using both programs, so I don't really have a preference. Any information on anything related is GREATLY appreciated.

 

Thank you in advance for taking the time to read this!

 

 

 

Not a 'professional' but I dabble in programming and 2d and 3d. Short answer, for basic and decent, 2d is definitely easier. There is a reason why most of the indie games are in 2d. Yes 3d has some reusablity advantages but this will mostly only be relevant in advanced high volume situations. The pipeline for decent 3d is much more complicated. Modeling->texturing->rigging etc vs create a sprite sheet. And the engine and integration issues for 3d will also be more complicated. Don't discount that 3d software is infamous for either being underpowered or a major PITA, often doing things in nonintuitive ways. Illustrator and photoshop although not the simplest software is miles ahead in usability and simplicity than autodesk bloatware.


In Topic: Beginner looking into game making

10 June 2013 - 11:40 PM

There are probably some kids' game making tools out there but they would be limited. If you want to make a whole, proper game you will need to learn c++ (may take a few months of dedicated practice), then learn OpenGL (a month or two of dedicated practice to draw basic shapes, learn picking, camera controls, etc, then a few months to learn shaders, lighting, textures etc), and if you didn't do linear algebra and physics at university you will need to learn physics and linear algebra which will take a variable amount of time depending on your prior training. Then you will be able to make a very, very basic game. A few years later you can look to make a proper 3D game. But working by yourself and not in a team making that 3D game could take years, even one that's ostensibly simple.

 

 

Not the world's greatest expert but this doesn't sound completely right. They didn't ask about learning to program an engine they asked about making a game.. Strictly speaking you don't need to learn any of what you just listed to make a game.

 

 

Hi, I have recently been looking into how to make games  on pc. I have found the whole thing to be rather... overwhelmingohmy.png I was wondering if anyone could put it in easier to understand terms. I would like to make a 3d game, maybe horror, or even a game similar to "Dear Esther" (Just exploring nice looking enviroments) for starts. I would like to know what engine to use, and any basic knowledge I would need to learn to start making this. I know almost nothing about game making as of right now, so make it simple xD.

 

Thanks in advance. biggrin.png

 

If you are just interested in making a game focus on making a game and don't get too wrapped up in making an engine. If you're using Dear Esther as your reference point I'd say a bigger problem would be creating assets. It would be straightforward to create a world with an engine like Ogre or Unity3D combined with some competent Scenebuilder and physics engine. In fact Ogre has a Demo which is basically the core of what you need (ie camera moving around a void with objects scattered about). Anyways

 

Basic programming: Needed

 

Graphics and sound engines: needed unless you want to build it from scratch.

 

C++: Not necessarily needed. It helps with more complicated games and elaborate tasks and is the standard for mainstream commercial titles but other simpler languages are used or often preferred by beginners. For Ogre though you will be working with C++.

 

OpenGL: Not needed unless you want to be a graphics programmer. Your engine will take care of most everything.

 

Fancy math: not needed, just have a good grasp of college level math and you should be fine for nonexotic tasks.

 

Graphics program: For a decent Dear Esther clone be prepared to either do a lot of searching on the internet or for you or someone working with you to crack open and learn your way around copy of photoshop and a 3d graphics editor. Good luck with that. 3d graphics programs like Maya are harder to learn than programming IMO.


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