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Tournicoti

Member Since 30 Aug 2009
Offline Last Active Aug 04 2014 04:01 AM

#5129552 human intelligence

Posted by Tournicoti on 07 February 2014 - 05:53 AM

 

 

 

A computer can perform calculations faster than MOST human brains... however there are people who have beaten computers at calculating ridiculous numeric calculations


That statement is absurd. Shakuntala Devi took 28 seconds to compute 7686369774870 * 2465099745779. That's quite a feat, no doubt. It would be hard for me to measure how long it takes my laptop to make that computation, but the order of magnitude is 0.00000001 seconds.

 

Thank you Alvaro, I didn't realize my 20 cents calculator was more intelligent than me, just because it can perform calculations I can't do myself. You seem to have a very good, clever and nice idea about what intelligence is.

 


Clearly I was making the argument that calculators are more intelligent than people because they can multiply faster. Good reading comprehension!

 

I really don't want to be mean with you, you give so much to  this community ... I sincerely mean it .... sad.png

This discussion makes me very sad and crazy ...

But Intelligence has nothing to do with the ability to perform fastly some computation... This is the ability to evolve given stimuli (inputs) ... the ability to learn !




#5129543 human intelligence

Posted by Tournicoti on 07 February 2014 - 04:55 AM

 

A computer can perform calculations faster than MOST human brains... however there are people who have beaten computers at calculating ridiculous numeric calculations


That statement is absurd. Shakuntala Devi took 28 seconds to compute 7686369774870 * 2465099745779. That's quite a feat, no doubt. It would be hard for me to measure how long it takes my laptop to make that computation, but the order of magnitude is 0.00000001 seconds.

 

Thank you Alvaro, I didn't realize my 20 cents calculator was more intelligent than me, just because it can perform calculations I can't do myself. You seem to have a very good, clever and nice idea about what intelligence is.

 

We are facing the Human VS Nature Dunning-Kruger effect ... sad.png

Are you high, or asleep ?




#5127228 human intelligence

Posted by Tournicoti on 29 January 2014 - 10:27 AM

"I really should stop posting on this thread, because I am not getting many coherent arguments from the other side"

 

Maybe because you treat the "other side" as shit ?? 




#5127225 human intelligence

Posted by Tournicoti on 29 January 2014 - 10:13 AM

 


I don't think a computer can think, but a software will probably can [...]

 

You keep making a distinction that is irrelevant to this discussion: When we talk about what a computer can do, we are talking about the hardware and the software combined.

 

Why are you so arrogant ?

A computer executes a software. A software is built by humans. These are completely different things. So I don't think it is irrelevant to this discussion

So my point is that, even a computer definitely can't think, a software that is executed on it could.




#5126557 human intelligence

Posted by Tournicoti on 26 January 2014 - 01:03 PM

I'm afraid this topic is a complete nonsense.

Computers are finite-state machines, human brain is not.

Comparing them makes no sense ... sad.png

 

And it will probably end in a sterile flame war in which I don't want to participate biggrin.png

 

The power of the (human) brain is that it can optimize the decisions, like a muscle can be stronger.

The power of a computer is that it can compute faster and without the factor "error".

 

"In some mounths" .... serioulsy ? Simulating a neural population that represents a single neo-cortical column needs a super-computer ... blink.png

 

They are so different machines !




#5112486 texturing an indexed primitive

Posted by Tournicoti on 27 November 2013 - 10:49 AM

I was hoping there was a way to have the "common" vertices referenced with different UVs

The vertex is a structure containing a position and texture coordinates here (at least)

So if you have same position but different texture coordinates, you'll have to define different vertices containing the same position but different texture coordinates.




#5110506 Shadows Problem

Posted by Tournicoti on 19 November 2013 - 11:00 AM

To render correctly your shadow map, you need to provide :

  • a correct Light Space :  World and View matrices
  • and a correct View Port



#5109430 Object Visibility

Posted by Tournicoti on 15 November 2013 - 06:34 AM

Hello

This is called frustum culling (you'll find a lot of articles via these keywords) : you compute the frustum that represents the visible area of your world according to your point of view (camera), and then you check collisions/penetrations between it and the bounding volumes of your entities.

 

Then, in order to accelerate the process (and do not check individually all the bounding volumes), space partitioning is needed, like octrees




#5082448 Printing prime numbers 1-100

Posted by Tournicoti on 02 August 2013 - 05:49 AM

I'm trying to learn from your code, Alvaro. However, what does this mean?

    if (v[p])

Does it mean "if element p exists"? Or does it mean "if element p is true"?

 

it means "if element p is true"?. the if statement will evaluate the condition, if it's true it will execute the first branch, the second branch otherwise, so saying "if (boolean==true)" is a bit redundant and means exactly the same thing than "if (boolean)"

 

The same goes with numerical values : saying "if (integer!=0)" if exactly the same than "if (integer)", since for numerical values the if statement checks if it's not zero.

 

(In fact this is the same behaviour for any type of value : first branch if not zero, second branch otherwise)




#5077989 Constant buffer madness! [fixed]

Posted by Tournicoti on 15 July 2013 - 05:04 PM

 

Each field in a constant buffer must be 16-byte aligned

#define ALIGN_REGISTER _declspec(align(16))

struct LightingConstants
{
     DirectX::XMFLOAT3    myLightDirection;
     ALIGN_REGISTER DirectX::XMFLOAT3    myLightColour;
     ALIGN_REGISTER DirectX::XMFLOAT3    myCameraPosition;
     ALIGN_REGISTER DirectX::XMFLOAT2    myHalfPixel;
     ALIGN_REGISTER DirectX::XMFLOAT4X4    myInverseViewProjection;
     float            myPadding;
};

.... should work. But maybe XM... types are already aligned, with D3DX I have to manually align the fields.

 

My explanation is quite bad, please check this http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb509632%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

Not all variables in a constant buffer will be aligned to 16-byte boundaries. Alignment issues only occur when a variable will straddle a 16-byte boundary. So for instance this constant buffer won't require any special alignment in your C++ struct:

cbuffer Constants
{
    float Var0; // Offset == 0
    float Var1; // Offset == 4
    float Var2; // Offset == 8
    float Var3; // Offset == 12
}
However something like this will cause the alignment rules to kick in:
cbuffer Constants
{
    float Var0;  // Offset == 0
    float Var1;  // Offset == 4
    float3 Var2; // Offset == 16, since a float 3 would occupy bytes [8-20] which would cross the boundar
    float Var3;  // Offset == 20
}

Hello MJP. That's why I suggested to follow the link....

Could we say that vectors and matrices must be 16-bytes aligned and scalars musn't ?

Thank you for your corrections




#5077831 Constant buffer madness! [fixed]

Posted by Tournicoti on 15 July 2013 - 05:57 AM

Actually, scratch what I said in those last two posts... aligning the members to 16 bytes does work smile.png

 

Thanks for fixing that up! I thought all off the XM stuff was aligned, guess not!

You're welcome. Glad you solve your problem smile.png




#5077825 Constant buffer madness! [fixed]

Posted by Tournicoti on 15 July 2013 - 05:46 AM

[EDITED]

#define ALIGN_REGISTER _declspec(align(16))

struct LightingConstants
{
     DirectX::XMFLOAT3    myLightDirection;
     ALIGN_REGISTER DirectX::XMFLOAT3    myLightColour;
     ALIGN_REGISTER DirectX::XMFLOAT3    myCameraPosition;
     ALIGN_REGISTER DirectX::XMFLOAT2    myHalfPixel;
     ALIGN_REGISTER DirectX::XMFLOAT4X4    myInverseViewProjection;
     float            myPadding;
};

.... should work.

 

Please check this http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb509632%28v=vs.85%29.aspx




#5072868 Extract corners of projection matrix...

Posted by Tournicoti on 25 June 2013 - 05:12 PM

Vector worldSpace = debugCam.GetView().Inverse() * viewSpace;

It should work with this smile.png

You need the inverse of the view matrix to go from view space to world space

 

Good luck




#5072709 Extract corners of projection matrix...

Posted by Tournicoti on 25 June 2013 - 04:23 AM

Hello

 

The bounds of the unit cube are :

 

[-1,1] along x axis

[-1,1] along y axis

 

[-1,1] along z axis in OpenGL (AFAIK)

[0,1] along z axis in DirectX




#5072522 Extract corners of projection matrix...

Posted by Tournicoti on 24 June 2013 - 10:40 AM

 

The resulting point is now in view space. At this point you can ignore the w component of the vector and multiply the resulting vector by the view matrix.

I would say "multiply the resulting vector by the inverse of the view matrix.






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