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Butabee

Member Since 29 Sep 2009
Offline Last Active Mar 25 2014 12:16 AM
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#5030271 How you design your games? And where to start?

Posted by Butabee on 08 February 2013 - 09:19 PM

Usually start out by creating a list of features or mechanics and things I want in the game. Then go in to detail of each feature. The go on to implementing things. Of coarse things get added and deleted also through development.




#5030255 Game development on: Linux or Windows

Posted by Butabee on 08 February 2013 - 07:55 PM

Use Unity 3D, you can build for PC, Mac, and Linux with the change of an option :)




#5030000 Absorbing power from slain enemies

Posted by Butabee on 08 February 2013 - 01:52 AM

I havn't really thought of the details yet, I'd have to thinkg it trough. I think it would be cool to allow temporary alpha status though.




#5029893 Absorbing power from slain enemies

Posted by Butabee on 07 February 2013 - 05:39 PM

I'm thinking of adding this to the MMO I'm working on... Players will absorb a portion of the enemies power they slay. The bonus power decays over time and is completely lost when they die. It also has diminishing returns. Players become battle hardened and gain less than previous kills.

 

If a player is killed by another player they will gain a percentage of the slain players power.

 

The bonus power is pretty much just a stat boost.

 

what do you think? Sound like an interesting mechanic?




#4990887 Multiple Lights, adding dot product?

Posted by Butabee on 16 October 2012 - 03:51 PM

What I'm doing in the engine I'm working on is calculating each different type of light value seperately... so like GI and diffuse...

Then I just add then together at the end in this form (lighta * basecolor) + (lightb * basecolor);


#4930147 Character Progression and Balance

Posted by Butabee on 11 April 2012 - 12:37 AM

Can the two co-exist?

It seems like if you want a player character to feel more powerful as they play, balance has to be sacrificed. What are some ways to keep both working adeqautely?


#4904762 Normalization Approximation in 30 operations

Posted by Butabee on 20 January 2012 - 10:44 PM

Just delete the post since the community seems to think it's useless.


#4904761 Normalization Approximation in 30 operations

Posted by Butabee on 20 January 2012 - 10:39 PM

So something that produces an approximate normal to what the real normal would be isn't normalizing... ok. If this was turned into SSE code it could be done in 11 operations.

This could work fine for lighting, generating normals as they are needed, but whatever, it's obvious no one here appreciates what I'm trying to do so I'm done.


#4903886 Normalization Approximation in 30 operations

Posted by Butabee on 17 January 2012 - 10:36 PM

I knew about those. I'll test my code against those and see what happens. I'm guessing the SSE will go faster.

Although if new things are never tried, nothing is ever advanced.


#4903877 Normalization Approximation in 30 operations

Posted by Butabee on 17 January 2012 - 09:41 PM

On a GPU I wouldn't touch this code with a 10-foot pole, no matter how happy the OP may be with it as an approximation. Normalization on a GPU is just a dp3, an rsq and a mul - 1 instruction slot each, 3 total, and all the benefits of parallel processing.


This is meant more for people who do software graphics.


#4903875 Normalization Approximation in 30 operations

Posted by Butabee on 17 January 2012 - 09:40 PM

*EDIT*

most recent version.

if(position.x < 0)

position.x *= -1

signx = -1

}
addvector = position.x + position.y + position.z

positionerror = 1.0 - addvector * 0.01

onediv = 1/ addvector

normal.x = (onediv * (position.x + position.x)) * positionerror) * signx;


At 20 operations. 1 divide, 13 muls and 5 adds and 1 subtraction


#4903637 Normalization Approximation in 30 operations

Posted by Butabee on 17 January 2012 - 09:12 AM

This code doesn't need a square root, and there's only 9 operations because the 1.0 divided by the 3 added up positions only needs to be done once per Vector.

1 division, 3 multiplies and, 5 additions.


As far as I've noticed the most it's off by is about 15%


#4903635 Normalization Approximation in 30 operations

Posted by Butabee on 17 January 2012 - 09:10 AM

The above formula is off by 15.47005383792515290182975610039% so if you multiply the above normals by 0.86602540378443864676372317075293 you should get a completely accurate normal.


#4903630 Normalization Approximation in 30 operations

Posted by Butabee on 17 January 2012 - 08:50 AM

I think I finally figured out a version that works... it is this


squaredvector = position.x * position.x + position.y * position.y + position.z * position.z
onediv = 1 / squaredvector
position.x *= signx
position.y *= signy
position.z *= signz
xper = position.x * onediv
yper = position.y * onediv
zper = position.z * onediv
posyz = position.y + position.z
posxz = position.x + position.z
posxy = position.x + position.y
xmul = 1.0 - (posyz * onediv)
ymul = 1.0 - (posxz * onediv)
zmul = 1.0 -(posxy * onediv)
normal.x = xper * (xmul * posyz)* signx
normal.y = yper * (ymul * posxz)* signy
normal.z = zper * (zmul * posxy) * signz


Think this is the final version.


#4897180 Radiosity Idea

Posted by Butabee on 24 December 2011 - 05:27 PM

If you are already working with voxels, there is no reason not to simply raytrace the global illumination. If you are using an octree, you wouldn't have to traverse the whole tree, since you probably wouldn't notice the difference.



I'm not using an octree, but I do have an idea that would probably give a better looking effect on the CPU. Just trying to think how costly it would be. I guess I'll try to do as much as I can on the CPU before trying to improve performance by using the GPU. it would be awesome if I could do a full CPU version that has nice performance and looks good.

What I would do on the CPU is actually have light voxels that overlay solid ones and then just check the light voxel at a given point to see how much lighting the solid voxel has.




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