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ryan20fun

Member Since 06 Oct 2010
Online Last Active Today, 12:31 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Will Unity or Unreal Engine 4 suit better for me?

09 May 2016 - 03:01 PM

The biggest difference between them, IMO, is that Unreal comes from an AAA lineage and has relatively recently started extending its reach down to mobile and indies, while Unity comes from a mobile (iOS) / indie lineage, and has been steadily extending its reach towards greater and greater AAA ambitions.

 

What this means for users is that they're really both converging towards similar capabilities, but they come at it from different beginnings. Both companies have a huge staff dedicated to ongoing engine development, very capable people all around, so you shouldn't make the mistake of assuming that Unreal is somehow more legitimate. In practice, Unreal has put a lot of effort into user-friendlier tooling with UE4 but there are still more and sharper rough edges than in Unity's tooling. Unity is more friendly for the casual developer, but sometimes the fact that they assume lesser of the average Unity user can get in the way -- Usually you can get around it, but it sometimes seems like more work than it ought to be, or that what you need is more hidden.

 

Licensing is also a big difference -- both in terms of access to the C++ source code (which you might come to need for performance tuning) and in cost to you to license either engine for commercial use. Unreal offers up C++ source code access for free, while Unity charges ~$50,000 last I checked. For usage, Epic wants 5% of your gross revenue above $3000 per product, per year, but there's no seat license -- this is nice and simple; its also entirely free if you're using it to make CG films, IIRC. Unity wants $75/month subscription or $1500/one-time fee per seat, per platform-package (e.g. extra iOS, Android features, Consoles -- which I think are a higher fee), but they don't take a cut of your sales after that. Depending on what platforms you target, how many developer seats you're licensing, and how many sales you expect to do, one of these options will save you money; If you make a lot of sales, Unity works out to be less expensive in the end -- the break-even point is lower or higher as a function of how many seats and platforms you license, and whether you need C++ source; but, you pay unity up front, regardless of whether you make any sales at all. Unreal costs more when you're successful, but it doesn't penalize you if you have a commercial failure -- 5% is really never a burden. When I worked it out once, basically if you make less than a couple hundred thousand in sales, Unity is the cheaper option; if you make more than that Unreal costs you, but making "too much money" is a wonderful problem to have and you'll probably be overjoyed to give them their 5%. That 5% is definitely cheaper than a team of high-caliber engine developers.

 

That said, whichever is most comfortable and has learning resources and a community that suites you is probably the way to go. Your game is always more important than the engine, and these engines and toolsets are already close enough to parity that either will block you from achieving your vision.

The Liscense has a reference in it that you can contact them for custom liscensing, But I don't know at what point that would be viable.

 

But I agree, having to pay Unity/Epic is a good problem to have :)


In Topic: Will Unity or Unreal Engine 4 suit better for me?

08 May 2016 - 06:06 AM

-Are the Unreal Engine 4 graphics way better than the ones of Unity, or just a bit?

I believe thare are one or two things that UE4 does that Unity does not, But Unity may also do one or two things that UE4 does not.

-are there much good up to date C++ Unreal Engine 4 learning sources out there?

Unfortunetly, There is not much C++ tutorial around.

But I believe Epic is aware of this and working on it.

 

-Extra question: do you have other advice, you would like tot share regarding this topic?

Use both if you can and then make a final descision.

 

You can check out the "Unreal Engine" YouTube channel if you want to see some of there tutorials and livestreams.

 

Are there an specific graphical technices you need for your games?

With UE4 you also have the option of getting the source from GitHub(once you've linked your Epic account to your GitHub one) and checking out a branch or fork and using that.

 

Right now UE4 does not seam to have a built in GI solution(there is the heightfield GI, But I don't know if that is viable).

There are forks for GI: VXGI(Nvidia Gameworks branch) And AHR branch)*

 

HTH

 

-Edit-

*I am refereing to realtime GI


In Topic: Game Tools!

03 May 2016 - 12:34 AM

 

 


So, a few question, is, how do you develop game engine? (cue in the laughtrack)

Not easily, You should start by making a game and then refracturing  the reusable parts.

I would suggest using libraries as much as possible to save you time and effort, Examples: Bullet Physics, Hieroglyph3 (Graphics), Ogre(Graphics), QT(UI), WxWidgets(UI), RakNet(Networking), Etc.

 

Bottom line: You will be able to build a (complete) game faster/easier using Unity/UE then building it from scratch.

 

I was building my own engine, Basic but usable.

Then I got UE4.10 and was able to recreate my game within a week (Check out "Toy on a Mission" Week of Awesome II).

Since then I have been adding stuff and features that would not be possible in such a time frame because I would have to figure it out and implement it.

 

Sure Unity/UE have there problems and quirks, But you need to decide what would be better for you.

 

HTH

 

 

Iseee, the problem is not that those engines are horrible... but being an open engine, it has tools above what i need.
I tried toy on mission!
Not exactly pixel precise in design and UI, but it's exactly what i feel how a game engine should be! I mean, it's lightweight and simple, runs and stable.
I tried compiling a game from Blender, and it requires to keep reinstalling the whole library of python interpreter to runtime.

So yeah, i think being able to hard code your content and game gives you alot of freedom to develop variety of content, and debug more flexibly.

What did you use to write your engine/game back then?x

 

Thanks for trying the game :)

 

I used C++ and Direct3D along with Bullet Physics, Assimp for 3D conversion to native format, FreeImage for image conversion to native format, AntTweakBar for the UI.

 

If I was to work on it again or start over I would change how I handle the graphics API, less inherintance and more of a blob style of passing data.

And try not to reinvent the wheel so much :P

 

But, I learned a lot from my experiance that is definetly helping with UE4.

Like how GPU's work (more or less), Networking is hard (I had only gone so far as to start integrating network support into some test demo's), Different ways to comunicate between objects.

 

I've seen an ad on the site banner about a 2D game engine that you could look at, Unfortunetly I don't remember it's name.

Likewise there may be other (smaller/less well known) engines that can help you if you decide to make your own engine).

 

HTH

 

-Edit-

The engine ad is "Atomic Game Engine" it is supposed to have 2D and 3D modules.


In Topic: Game Tools!

02 May 2016 - 04:33 AM


So, a few question, is, how do you develop game engine? (cue in the laughtrack)

Not easily, You should start by making a game and then refracturing  the reusable parts.

I would suggest using libraries as much as possible to save you time and effort, Examples: Bullet Physics, Hieroglyph3 (Graphics), Ogre(Graphics), QT(UI), WxWidgets(UI), RakNet(Networking), Etc.

 

Bottom line: You will be able to build a (complete) game faster/easier using Unity/UE then building it from scratch.

 

I was building my own engine, Basic but usable.

Then I got UE4.10 and was able to recreate my game within a week (Check out "Toy on a Mission" Week of Awesome II).

Since then I have been adding stuff and features that would not be possible in such a time frame because I would have to figure it out and implement it.

 

Sure Unity/UE have there problems and quirks, But you need to decide what would be better for you.

 

HTH


In Topic: what is meant by Gameplay?

25 April 2016 - 01:58 PM

They are probably talking about stuff like powerups and interactions.

 

So your different health, ammo, whatever containers are done as a script as performance is not an issue and a scripting language allows you to iterate faster.


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