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Moonflow449

Member Since 15 Oct 2010
Offline Last Active Jul 25 2013 10:23 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: The path I choose to break in.

28 May 2012 - 09:48 AM

Azgur: I didn´t know that designers might end up learning programming too, it´s good to know. And yeah in level design I found a lot of limitations to do something fun and at the same time creative, UDK (the softwer I choose) requires programming skill to make your own rules.

Destin Bales: Thank you, it´s a fantastic guide. there is a lot of nice information.
To be hired to make games, first become good at making games o.o, makes a lot of sense.

In Topic: The path I choose to break in.

27 May 2012 - 10:26 AM



Proving yourself as a game designer is generally a bit trickier than the other professions (like artist, programmer, etc).
While level design demonstrates a certain skill, it doesn't really demonstrate particular game designer skill.

Personally I find there's a really good solution to this outside of the realm of digital entertainment.
Designing, balancing and play testing table-top/card games is an excellent way to hone and prove your skill as a game designer.
The assumption here is that you do attempt to go out of the box a bit Posted Image


Thank you for the sugestion Posted Image it seems a good idea to improve skills as a designer but maybe it would be a little bit hard to get the job with that kind of work, how do you show to a company that your game is fun? in person?


It's a hard thing to show, but being able to explain design decisions and the results they get goes a long way.
You could even record play testing sessions if you wanted to. Though, the former is more likely what would happen Posted Image.
At the very least, record your progress. What problems did you find, which decisions did you make to fix them, that's great stuff to show off.

I guess half the issue with game design always is proving/showing your skill before you have released titles on your resume.
Some companies will give you a design test. Having done board games or other games will have prepared you for these tests more than having done level design.
Unless your intention is to get hired as a level designer.

Either way, generally it comes down to sounding like you know what you're talking about at the interview.
In order to reach that point you need practice and a ton of it. And making digital games can be a bit too time consuming and too technical to efficiently spent your time honing your game designer skill.

However, that said. It will still be worth it to make games in Flash or other lower entry technologies.


Thank you again! I found your comments very useful.

You said "too time consuming and too technical to efficiently spent your time honing your game designer skill". I am interested in knowing what kind of work you are referring, I know a little bit of design, but more about the theory then actually the practice.

By the way, I don´t want to be a level designer my whole life, I don´t even like it too much, I´m just trying to break in. i need money, if I can´t start to work soon in something related with videogames I might end up in a MacDonald’s or something like that :S

In Topic: The path I choose to break in.

26 May 2012 - 03:11 PM

Proving yourself as a game designer is generally a bit trickier than the other professions (like artist, programmer, etc).
While level design demonstrates a certain skill, it doesn't really demonstrate particular game designer skill.

Personally I find there's a really good solution to this outside of the realm of digital entertainment.
Designing, balancing and play testing table-top/card games is an excellent way to hone and prove your skill as a game designer.
The assumption here is that you do attempt to go out of the box a bit Posted Image


Thank you for the sugestion :) it seems a good idea to improve skills as a designer but maybe it would be a little bit hard to get the job with that kind of work, how do you show to a company that your game is fun? in person?

In Topic: The path I choose to break in.

25 May 2012 - 03:01 AM


So in order to put my feet on the door and live from videogames I am thinking on doing level design, the finished work would be a video showing the level.
is this a good way to archive my goal?


No. One level is not enough. You should design at least three levels.
And while videos are a reasonable way of showing your designs to someone who does not have the necessary base technology to run your levels on, you should also provide the levels themselves, for people who do have the necessary base technology.
Level design is a good entry path to game design. You need to build a level design portfolio website, and make your levels and videos and resume available there.


Thank you for your answer, I will do that.

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