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Mind Calamity

Member Since 23 Dec 2010
Offline Last Active Jul 02 2013 07:33 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Vector/Quaternion help - pitch bone to direction vector

18 June 2013 - 05:33 PM

I've kinda solved this myself by adapting the Camera::setDirection code from OGRE to work for my need:
 
Now I have the following code:
Vector3 boneDir = getBoneWorldOrientation(mEntity, mHips) * Vector3::UNIT_Z; //mDirection;
Vector3 dir = mCameraTrans->_getDerivedDirection();

Vector3 zAdjustVec = dir;
zAdjustVec.normalise();

Quaternion targetWorldOrientation;

Vector3 xVec = Vector3::UNIT_Y.crossProduct(zAdjustVec);
xVec.normalise();

Vector3 yVec = zAdjustVec.crossProduct(xVec);
yVec.normalise();

targetWorldOrientation.FromAxes(xVec, yVec, zAdjustVec);

// mTransform is basically the SceneNode of the character, I'm multiplying the target orientation with it's inverse orientation to get it to parent/character-space.
mHips->_setDerivedOrientation(mTransform->_getDerivedOrientation().Inverse() * targetWorldOrientation);
The above code was taken from OgreCamera.cpp, the setDirection function, the part with the fixed yaw axis.
Now, that works... Sorta, I now get this problem at near-90 degree pitch, the orientation kind of flips to the other side, I've made another video to showcase this:
 
 
Any ideas on how to fix this ?

In Topic: Can't seem to bind a class - Compile errors.

31 January 2013 - 03:06 PM

That was such a stupid mistake on my part. Sorry about that. :)

 

I tried so many different ways to bind it, and I tried removing "const" on one of them, and I still got the same result, but this time that was the problem. :)

 

Thanks for the quick reply.


In Topic: Beginning Game Development Path - Need Opinions

15 April 2012 - 11:54 AM


You're years away from needing to worry about the few milliseconds that C++ might gain you. You should be worried about the hours you'll waste dealing with C++ features that are easier or complete non-issues in other languages.


You don't waste hours working with c++ if you learn it. It is also a much more elegant language if used properly, and cannot only save you "milliseconds" if used correctly, but can save you much more than that by being low enough to skip a lot of unneeded steps.


Agreed, those hours "wasted" on C++ will be hours gained on game development in the months to come, with every hour you "waste" dealing with C++ problems you gain knowledge, you research and you may even stumble upon stuff that make you think in ways you never would have thought if you did everything by the book. Also, I may be weird, but sometimes I get enjoyment from dealing with C++ problems, at least the end result gives me more a feeling of satisfaction like nothing else can.

If you learn C++ you will gain enough knowledge to do programming in mostly any major language used for the purpose of game development, as they are all quite similar (also majorly different at some points), but all in all C/C++ is the core of all game development, and whatever you do you will probably run into it one day no matter how much you try to avoid it.

But enough about that. Your plan looks good overall, also about the audio, you are likely to use SDL/SFML for that, so you would be all set for graphics and all the other stuff too, you can use both SDL and SFML components without having a window created by them, meaning - you can have audio in your text-based RPG.

In Topic: Wipeout/F-Zero-like Dynamics ?

15 April 2012 - 10:45 AM

Sorry for the late update guys, but I started developing the game I had imagined a few months ago, at the time this thread was created, and even though I wanted it to be like Wipeout I missed an important fact which was probably the main reason I opened this thread - in Wipeout you can't turn your vehicle more than 70-90 degrees sideways, thus, obviously removing your ability to turn back, which means that the above post about the curve was exactly what I needed at the time, but for now I have no way of turning back as I've used Bullet Vehicle to get to this point and I think I'm going to finish it before trying out new gameplay mechanics.

Weird thing is I realized this only after playing the demo of TurboFly3D for Android, which is pretty similar to Wipeout.

And, yeah high speed racing is pretty tough to pull out with regular physics simulation, I started having problems turning when going 400+ KM/h, but all-in-all I think I'll manage.

Thanks for all your tips and suggestions guys, I appreciate it.

BTW - Before starting the bullet vehicle thing I developed another vehicle which calculated only collisions with bullet, and I handled most of the dynamics, like turning and stuff, so I guess in a few weeks/months I will give this method a try.

In Topic: Wipeout/F-Zero-like Dynamics ?

17 February 2012 - 07:12 PM

Thanks guys, I'll start coding for real tomorrow, and as this is a project that I'm likely to use for a school competition so I think I'll make the code public.

Also, I did try with the raycast vehicle (but for a real car, not antigravity crafts), and I didn't get far with the tuning as I couldn't get it to properly corner (it "cornered" faster then it actually went).

I'll give the invisible wheels suggestion a shot (and make the suspension looser to get that hovery/floaty effect).

I'll see if I can do something that's not a hack for the tilting problem.

Also Tunneling is a great problem in fast-paced games, so CCD will do some good.

I'm always open to more suggestions, feel free to drop them if you have any! Posted Image

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