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Riztro

Member Since 30 Dec 2010
Offline Last Active Sep 02 2013 10:15 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: C++ Developer moving to Web

14 July 2013 - 01:37 PM

 

I really don't see why I can't use both. I mean learning JS will be great for me because I will understand the outputted code of emscripten and for managing input on my website. Emscripten would be great for optimized code that is used to make a game. So what do you guys think, should I just learn both and use both where they fit best? smile.png

 

Yup, that would actually be my recommendation! :-)

 

// Well, except that I wouldn't expect to gain much from looking at the output codegen, since it relies on asm.js and mostly looks like this:

asmjs1.png

 

Ahh I can read that just fine! ;). Now I am hoping I can make a nice website with the help of the CSS, Jquery, and HTML skills taught here and here and a fun little sandbox game with Escripten and some micro frameworks using inline JS!


In Topic: C++ Developer moving to Web

14 July 2013 - 01:06 PM

Okay so I think I am getting two recommendations here, unless I am reading this all wrong... :D. From what I can tell Serapth I think is pushing towards straight JS while Matt and Karsten are pushing me towards C++ JS. I really don't see why I can't use both. I mean learning JS will be great for me because I will understand the outputted code of emscripten and for managing input on my website. Emscripten would be great for optimized code that is used to make a game. So what do you guys think, should I just learn both and use both where they fit best? :) 

 

I mean Karsten does have a point Serapth. Emscripten doesn't look like its only meant for lazy people who don't want to learn a new language. It also provides optimizations that would be time consuming to manually write. So if I could get more speed from it, why not use it for games? :)

 

And if I have C++ code, it would be a lot easier to make a desktop version or a mobile version of the game.

 

Thanks again for the replies :)


In Topic: C++ Developer moving to Web

13 July 2013 - 11:51 PM

Simply put, people using C++ on the web, are doing so because they are unwilling to learn another language.  

 

 

... this is not recommended.

Okay so then I guess I will just continue learning java script. I am willing to learn another language. I guess now I just have to weed out the bad of java script with the help of the resources suggested above and then learn the Micro-frameworks. Any recommendations on micro frameworks that I can use to help me make games (mostly in the graphics section of things but sound would be good too)?


In Topic: C++ Developer moving to Web

13 July 2013 - 06:17 PM

Thank you very much for all of your replies! I have mixed feelings in the posts here. Most people here seem to think JavaScript is useful, but also full of traps that will land you in a pile of crap! :D. Some others also seem to push towards using C++ for Web, which actually sounds very appealing because I LOVE C++. So now I am at a point where I think I should learn java script for Node.js and web pages. Then use C++ and Wt or Emscripen for the game. 

 

Some questions:

  1. Does the above sound reasonable?
  2. Should I use Emscripen or Wt for web pages? Or will regular java script work better for small interactive things on the web page?
  3. Does Emscripen or Wt easily support external JS libraries?

 

BTW I have found this to expand my website design knowledge. Does it look like it will be useful?

 

Thanks again! All your words and advice are very helpful :)


In Topic: Moving from C++/OpenGL to JS/WebGL

30 March 2013 - 10:40 AM

Though it is hated by many, W3Schools is where I go for quick references on every web development language or technology. I have seen a few errors and wrong statements, but none of them have been "game-changers" or really all that important.

 

Also, Tuts+ has a sub-domain of net.tutsplus.com. It is their web development portal. Its not really "tutorials" for people learning web development, but rather articles (and a few tutorials) for advanced developers looking to improve their projects. The downside is that for some of the more "revolutionary" or "this is really epic technology" articles, you do need to be a Tuts+ Premium member which means paying $19/month or $15/month for Monthly or Yearly, respectively.

 

Lastly, I found this page full of links to other tutorials. I've never used any of them, but I just now looked through them and at their code and they seem well made.

 

Thank you very much! I will check these sites out!


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