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polyorpheus

Member Since 10 Jan 2011
Offline Last Active Feb 11 2011 12:53 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: How I'm learning the material.

06 February 2011 - 12:28 AM

You're all welcome. I'm glad other people found them useful. :D

In Topic: Is anyone else lost?

29 January 2011 - 06:21 PM

I'm reading this ExtremeTech article and it's becoming a good foundation for some of the textbook/tutorial stuff: http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,2845,1150102,00.asp

In Topic: XNA Workshop Member Introductions!

17 January 2011 - 01:13 AM

Hey Justin, Scott, and Zack (so far), I'm Jan (euro pronunciation, yet I'm not european). I'm a 3rd year Comp Sci student at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, taking a year off.

I love games and dabbled with XNA in the past, but nothing to show for it. I made my new year's resolution to make a good, highly polished game by myself and finish it.

I'm proficient at programming in C, C#, Java and some assembly, but most of the knowledge comes from school, and I never seem to find a good way of learning how to make games online, so here I am.

An interesting fact about me is that I have a polyphasic sleep schedule, meaning that I sleep 30 minutes every 3 1/2 hours, so in an entire day, I only sleep for about 3 hours. It was a crazy experiment a while ago and it's become a pretty awesome part of my life.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to all of what this workshop has to teach and meeting and interacting with the people here. I'm of the same mind as Justin to join a team to make a game that will KICK ASS. :P

In Topic: My Direction To Game Development

16 January 2011 - 11:39 PM

Hey forum,

It's been a really long night studying for my CIS 163 class, or rather, trying to learn up different concepts that I can possibly apply to my latest project for the class (CIS 163 is, by the way Java Programming II). I know, a 100 level course must seem really mundane and elementary to you - which has me at my latest conundrum. I want to be in game development, I have a lot of ideas and if I give up on this, I'll never get to express them. I'm trying really, really hard to understand this material. I figured, the closest thing to creation is programming... at it's roots. But it's just not sticking T.T I feel like the examples I'm given are not applicable to what I need to do.

I have spent hours and hours looking over materials on the web, looking over my course book, looking at different pieces of code and I just cannot bring it together in my mind, to figure out how to apply any of it. I'm becoming so discouraged, but I don't want to give up. I hate asking for help because, even though it was very rudely put it makes sense, if I keep asking for help on this stuff, I'm not going to be able to work independent. I won't always have a hand to hold in my future of programming, and when I don't have that assistance to help me through anymore, will I be able to make the cut? My biggest fear is no.

I mean, I have been tasked to make a Connect 4 game, which should be a sum up of everything we did in CIS 162, but when I go to start the project, I just draw a blank. It's basic arrays, conditionals, GUI; stuff I should know... but I don't know how to put the pieces together. I feel like everyone else around me is getting it, but I'm just the cattle in the back of the herd, falling behind.

I've never had great insight into the actual career of Game Development. I was going to Davenport, which had a major in Game Development, but I transferred to Grand Valley because I was told it was more accredited and more impressive to employers. Since they don't have a "game design" major, I picked my next closest interest (looking at what I wanted to do as a whole) and that was computer science. I've looked online too, and I've noticed a lot of people saying that a degree in Computer Science is a good one to have for this field coupled with a year or so of technical training in a game design school, while many other people simply say, "Just try making your own games for training" or "I didn't need college to be a successful game developer". This day and age is different though, and if I want to pursue my interest I know I need that fancy piece of paper.

I'm sorry for just bursting out like this, but I've been apart of the community for a while and haven't posted a whole lot, and I know a majority of the people here know their stuff in this field and I guess I'm just screaming out in the wind. Now for some rest for my 9 AM class tomorrow XD


I'm in much of the same boat in terms of trying to get an idea in my head into programming. I don't know what kind of rules your class has in terms of collaboration, but often, if I get an idea from another student on how to approach something, I take that and look at what will work and what won't and offer changes, to which other people do the same. It's hard to have a beginning idea on how to start, but once I get an idea on how to go about programming it, it goes downhill from there.

For the connect 4 game, you could look at the board as an 2D array with 3 possible entries for empty, blue and red. You could have a command-line version working (e.g. type in something like "red 2 4" where 2 and 4 are the column/row numbers) and play with that until it's working. Then you can replace the command-line outputs with the graphics/mouse input or however you want to do input.

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