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axefrog

Member Since 08 Apr 2011
Offline Last Active Today, 03:04 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Rendering a texture with transparency

Today, 02:48 AM

Success!

 

 

(The cube on the right is from lessons on lighting, so ignore that one with regards to this post)


In Topic: Light theory - radiance vs material exitance?

Yesterday, 03:30 PM

Ok cool, thanks. I'll do that.


In Topic: Alliterate

19 October 2014 - 10:03 PM

Cool little game, I enjoyed it! The design and typography was nice and clean too. Thoughts I had while playing:

  • I didn't initially notice that there was a 60 second countdown - might be worth noting that in the instructional blurb.
  • The scoring doesn't seem to take into account that some letters have a lot more common words than other letters. I could only think of three that start with 'X' for instance.
  • It'd be cool if you had some sort of mode where the scoring of a given word is affected by the length of time it took to think of, and that scoring adds bonus time to allow the player to keep going for longer. Right now it feels like there is an opportunity for a level of addictiveness that hasn't yet been realised.
  • The endgame effect (i.e. running out of time) I think should be more pronounced. Right now, it just kind of stops. Think "Game Over: Your score was X!"
  • When the game has ended, I click to restart, but it doesn't restart, it just resets the game, making me have to click a second time to start the game.

In Topic: Deciding on a Game Engine?

19 October 2014 - 05:41 PM

I have to ask the question - if you really want this, why is $19/month a huge deal to come by? That's less than $5/week. If at any point you prioritise casual consumption expenditures (a new TV, a coke and chocolate bar, a fancy coffee from Starbucks), then you need to reframe your expenditure on your tools. They are your tools, just as a carpenter doesn't complain about having to buy a hammer or fuel for his vehicle, as developers we should find value in paying for the tools of our trade. And $19/month isn't that much really.


In Topic: What can we do to help remove the industry misconception?

18 October 2014 - 10:55 PM

How can most women have a misconception about an industry they mostly aren't exposed to in the first place? I understand that some women may come into the industry or have aspirations to do so, then become aware of, or are exposed to, the negative aspects that this debate seems to highlight, and thus leave or decide not to be a part of it, but it seems to me that whatever the cause of the low percentage of female workers in this industry (and other similarly-technical fields), it likely largely starts well before they ever become aware of any particular viewpoint about the attitudes in the industry. If you cold-called ten thousand women and surveyed them on the topic, I'm willing to bet that most express less general interest in the industry that men to begin with (and I have no particular opinion on why that may be the case), and that interest (or lack thereof) would probably largely ignorant of what goes on inside the industry.

 

Trends usually follow some sort of weighted curve (bell/exponential/whatever), so there are always extremes, exceptions, edge cases and commonalities, but, admitting that my experiences don't likely represent an even cross section of the population, a large majority of women that I have been exposed to don't seem to show a whole lot of interest in any kind of serious gaming beyond simple casual consumption, nor do they commonly express any specific interest or knowledge in the industry, and even those who are gamers don't often seem to express aspirations regarding the industry beyond simply getting to play games in their spare time. It's hard to then make the argument that the proportion of male developers to female developers is based on negative attitudes in the industry without first illustrating that there is enough female interest in the industry to begin with, such that a more even split is something that would be likely if the attitudes of employees in the industry were different to what they currently are [perceived to be].

 

I would argue that the disparity problem is based on causes that start long before we ever hit any of the issues of game industry negativity that have come up in recent times. Perhaps we should focus on addressing those, and with an influx of women coming to the industry in the future, the rebalancing of the male-female ratio might in turn balance some of the attitudes and approaches of some of those who are in the wrong.

 

I could be reading this all wrong, and I don't have a strong opinion on the subject, I'm just noting what I have observed and what seems logical to me.


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