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supageek

Member Since 10 Feb 2012
Offline Last Active Feb 25 2014 11:44 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Trying to flesh out a Roguelike

21 October 2012 - 06:57 AM

From what I've gathered and learned, you probably need to flech out the doc a bit more before you start coding.
Things like games flow, asset categories, feature list, etc.

You may want to do a search for Design Doc templates/guidelines to get an idea.

In Topic: Beyond gameplay, reasons to stay in the game? (RPG)

30 September 2012 - 06:12 AM

For skills, look at GTA:San Andreas or sports games. Skills have a forced balance to them, you cannot be a master of everything. There was and MMO that i read about sometime earlier this year that adopted a "Use it or Lose it" approach to skill leveling. This will prevent any player from becoming maxed out. Eliminate class and let players unknowling determine for themselves where their strenghts will be based on how they play. The more the use a skill, the stronger it gets and the opposite.

With that in place, players will have to change their play styles to combat differing challenges. You may also think of having the game scale or morph it's challenged based on the player, enemies will become stronger defending against the player common tactics and will attack in ways that exploit the player's weaknesses.

If you wish to keep a player playing after the final quest, using multiplayer is usually your best option but you could also have challenged produced by the game in reaction to the player. A few indie games i've seen continue forever becoming harder based on the player. "Bosses Forever."

In Topic: The Evolution of Social Bonds in MMOs

30 September 2012 - 06:01 AM

I think all MMO's should be taking a lesson from E.V.E., the game was built to allow players to be in control, not leaning on the idea of quests and raids and loot, but on a player dictated game world. This keeps the game from becoming boring as things are always changing and keeps players interacting with each other, there's no way around it.

Design an MMO with that philosphy in mind, a world that is blank and is to be builtamd controlled by the players. Minecraft does this to a degree but without dedicated servers, it lacks the "Massive" part of MMO, and is instead confined to many singular experiences or small groups.

In Topic: How items should work in MMOs?

30 September 2012 - 05:52 AM

Getov, thank you very much for your valuable comments! Those are helping me to define the mechanics of items in my design, now I have a better idea of what to do.

And I have another idea flying around my head. I'm thinking when the player is about to sign out he will have the option to setup an automatic shop. That is when the player is out, his character will be shown camping in the last position he was, like a protected NPC, and his character will work there as a merchant. The gamer can choose which objects he wants to sell to other players that interact with his character. Do you think this might be a good idea?



Maybe you shoud limit the items the player can sell based on their progress (level/location). Lesser healing items and weapon repair at lower levels and greater items at higher levels or something of that nature.
That is a very interesting idea. May you could allow player that stop there to leave something with the player that they will find when they login again, like a note or gift.

You may also think of allowing bartering, trading items based on a price/value metric set by the player or a request list. "i have these items I don't need and I'm need this amount of X items."

In Topic: Tutorials - How to Learn a Game's Mechanics

30 September 2012 - 05:46 AM

Put a library in the game full of books where the player cna visit and read all they want about the mechanics and controls of the game. All of thwe writing should be in service of the fiction of the game.

Or, just try to design your controls and mechanics to be like a puzzle, where part of the fun is figuring out the controls.

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