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TheVirtualDragon

Member Since 03 Jun 2012
Offline Last Active Dec 01 2012 10:09 AM

Topics I've Started

Linux Desktop Environments

27 October 2012 - 05:58 AM

Hello All.

I use Linux and I know about Window Managers and Desktop Environments and X11.
I don't want to create a desktop environment from scratch, but I want to know how WMs and DEs work together. Is a DE just a WM with an additional layer of graphics? And how do Desktop Environments work, exactly?

Finally, I want to know how people "fork" desktop environments - for example, Cinnamon forking from Gnome3. How would I do this, and what license would I use?

Thanks in advance.

Open Source Downgration

08 October 2012 - 09:59 AM

I was looking at the QT-Digia site, and I found that they really try not to get people to use open source. So i thought that it would be a good game to see how many examples we can find of companies trying to downgrade open source projects or licenses.

Here's what Digia say about GPL:

LGPL and GPL are complex licenses that contain many obligations and restrictions you must abide with. Always consult an experienced lawyer before choosing these licenses for your project.


Is it really that dangerous to develop under LGPL and GPL? On Linux, most things are GPL so I find this really weird.

How were new features added to C?

28 August 2012 - 02:26 AM

I was recently reading about how the first C++ compiler was CFront which basically translated the C++ code in to C code and then compiled it. Well, I want to know how it translated classes and other new features in C++ which were not there in C. In fact, how were/are new features added to a programming language in the first place? I saw something about preprocessors. Well, what are they exactly and how do you write them?

I would appreciate it if you could answer in a easy-to-understand sort of way. I am asking here because I have googled this and not understood most of it.

EDIT: Also, isn't the preprocesser in C/C++ the hash symbol (#) ?

Making 2D-Platformer Levels

16 August 2012 - 07:42 AM

Suppose you are making a 2D platform game. You are now at the stage where you need to design the levels. This game you are making can be tile based or have epic graphics. It also uses Box2D/Chipmunk/<Insert your favourite physics engine here> to manage the collisions and physics.

Well, I am doing exactly just that and until now, I have been drawing 50 by 50 tiles in Gimp, then loading them in to my game and drawing them according to a little text file which defines the level (e.g. a "2" means grass tile). But now, I have had a thought. Wouldn't it be easier if you just opened up Gimp/Photoshop and actually drew the level your self? This would be very easy to do: open a tile, copy it and paste it on to your level and then move it around depending on where you want it. Then you could save it as .png and load it in to your game. Then, you could tell the physics engine where the ground is etc. (basically creating bodies in the case of Box2D).

So, is this a better way to create levels in a game (like the one described)? You could easily move and edit the tiles around or even eliminate the need for tiles altogether and have a vectorial game. Then you could just load the saved image and display it and that would be it.

Good open-source platform games

04 August 2012 - 01:02 PM

Hello, I am creating a 2d platform game in C++ and I am having problems with creating the engine. I want to know if there is a good open-source platform game so I can study it's engine. I would prefer it to be using SFML for graphics and Box2D for physics, but it doesn't really matter as I want to look at the structure not the actual code.

Instead, if there is a good tutorial on how to make a good game engine, then I will have a look at it. I have looked at some examples but not really understood most of it as it is too complex for me. This is my first game (apart from tic-tac-toe and pong) so I don't want my engine to be overly complicated.

Additional Information: I have about 2 years of experience in C++ and am dual booting Linux and Windows (so the platform doesn't matter - as long as it is not OS X).

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