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MrDaaark

Member Since 01 Aug 2001
Offline Last Active May 16 2013 07:14 AM
*****

#5038397 Do I learn the skills I need then make the game, or do I work on the game, an...

Posted by MrDaaark on 02 March 2013 - 06:11 AM

Mr Cenation, you learn while doing, and you never stop learning. Your starting point now is to read through C# books and pick up all the information you can. Practice, and make sure to complete all the end chapter exercises.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa288436(v=vs.71).aspx

Also, see my post here: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/639627-best-way-to-learn-game-programming/


#5038389 Best way to learn game programming

Posted by MrDaaark on 02 March 2013 - 05:51 AM

or am i better off getting a c# book and sitting down and making the boring console programs etc

With this attitude, you'll still be asking this question years from now.

Those boring console example programs teach you the fundamentals of the language and the basic concepts programming itself. You have to know these things to be able to make your games.

For instance, people always say that they want to make RPGs. Which is fine, but they think because they know how to draw a sprite on the screen they can suddenly make an RPG. Drawing is the last step, not the first.

RPG games have inventories. How do you make a class that will represent all your items? How do you store and keep track all those items on the character? How do you find the one you need? How do you check to see if a character possesses a required item? How do you sort them by type? How do you remove x about of item y? How do you swap items between characters?

The answers to those questions are learned when you make those boring console programs.

The programming behind a graphical game doesn't look any different than the programming behind a boring console program. When one is done it's update loop, it draws a picture. When the other is done, it draws text. Everything else is the same.


#5038376 Blender units to directx units?

Posted by MrDaaark on 02 March 2013 - 05:36 AM

The only possible way for the scale to be ff is if the scale factor is wrong in the exporter. Also, make sure you set the rotation, scale, and location to indentity in Object Mode. (Select object + Ctrl-A)


#5038268 PS3 games in C++..

Posted by MrDaaark on 01 March 2013 - 09:12 PM


Ironically enough, Sony started an indy program today. There is a form to fill out on their site. It covers all their consoles.

 
Hmmm, is this different from the Playstation Suite (Mobile) SDK they released about a year ago? Granted, they haven't done as well as Microsoft in promoting their indie-friendly SDK to developers. I searched for "Sony Indie SDK" on Google and didn't find anything relevant and new from this week.


I'm not sure. I just followed the link off their twitter feed, and it brought me to a form. I think you had to fill out the form to get any details.

https://twitter.com/PlayStation/status/306848930052841472

Become a Registered Developer

Why PlayStation?

With the ability to self-publish across PlayStation Network, PS® Vita, and PlayStation Mobile there’s a PlayStation platform for every game. No slotting, no voting. You are the publisher!

Get started in 3 easy Steps!

Fill in and return the Company Information Form.
Review and return the NDA & Tools Loan Agreement (sent to you once we receive your information).
Complete registration for PlayStation DevNet.


The developer relations team will be in contact to work through these steps.


<blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p>Indie developers in North America: Interested in making a game for PS4, PS3, or PS Vita? Sign up here: <a href="http://t.co/7oQW6Hdxa9" title="http://bit.ly/YWFLj4">bit.ly/YWFLj4</a></p>&mdash; PlayStation (@PlayStation) <a href="https://twitter.com/PlayStation/status/306848930052841472">February 27, 2013</a></blockquote>
<script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>


#5038180 Game: Health regeneration?

Posted by MrDaaark on 01 March 2013 - 04:45 PM


I don't 100% understand this, because you are talking about health regeneration, but posting graphics drawing code. If you increase the amount of health in the update logic, your drawing code won't have to know about it. Just draw the amount of health every frame, and it will naturally animate smoothly, because the health is animating smoothly.

const float RecoveryRate = 150.0f; //Health to recover per second (150 * 4 = 600)

Update(dt)
{
Health += (RecoveryRate * dt);
}

dt is delta time. It's the time in seconds since the last update. Every time you update your game, you should measure the time, and get the current delta time.

SDL may have a way to get the delta time automatically... I'll google something... here smile.png http://gameprogrammingtutorials.blogspot.ca/2010/01/sdl-tutorial-series-part-5-dealing-with.html


#5038167 Breaking into industry without coding or art skills.

Posted by MrDaaark on 01 March 2013 - 04:12 PM

I can't code and I can't draw.

Of course you can. You just haven't applied yourself.

If you want to code, code.
If you want to draw, draw.

They are both just skills you acquire over time by practicing.


#5037483 PS3 games in C++..

Posted by MrDaaark on 28 February 2013 - 12:46 AM

Ironically enough, Sony started an indy program today. There is a form to fill out on their site. It covers all their consoles.


#5037440 3D hack and slash browser MMO!

Posted by MrDaaark on 27 February 2013 - 09:02 PM

Unity3D + Web Browser plugin. smile.png


#5037059 PS3 games in C++..

Posted by MrDaaark on 27 February 2013 - 03:24 AM

Sony and Microsoft only give development kits to big companies with lots of money and a resume of previous completed titles, and even then, it's not a given.

You can sell an indy game on Microsoft's Xbox Live Indy Games channel. It costs 99$ for a Creator's Club membership, and you can put up anything for sale as long as it passes a technical peer review. But I believe you have to be at least 18, so that means you have to wait 5 years, and I'm sure the service won't be around by then.

You can get a Google play developer's license for 25$ and then develop anything you want for the Google Play Store. This is one path of least resistance. Then you can develop for Android phones and tablets, and eventually, the Ouya.


#5037052 PS3 games in C++..

Posted by MrDaaark on 27 February 2013 - 02:54 AM

You can't do anything Playstation related unless you rent out a development kit from Sony, as I said above.

You have a PC, you can make and test PC games.

Night, doesn't the publisher only lease them? That is what I have read all over the place.


#5037041 PS3 games in C++..

Posted by MrDaaark on 27 February 2013 - 02:24 AM

You can't.

You need the official tools and development kit that Sony only rents out to qualified publishers and developers.


#5036998 C++ difference between variable and object

Posted by MrDaaark on 26 February 2013 - 10:46 PM

As Simply as possible.

A variable is an unknown value that can and will change during the execution of a program. It varies. It's given a name as an alias over an address or offset. The name is used for convenience, since we don't need to know or care what the address offset is.

So something like

int32 Number;

Means that at some memory address, there are 32 bits(4 bytes) of data that represent a whole number.

So when you write

int32 Number2 = Number - 16;

The program has to go to that memory address to read the value of 'Number' before it can complete the operation.

Constants are data that does not vary. They are known values.

So when you write

const int32 Number = 16;
int32 Number2 = Number - 16;

The program ends up just doing 16 - 16 because in this case 'Number' is a known value, and it gets replaced with '16' at compile time. There is nothing to look up.

A class is just a data structure layout. A data structure can be any combination of variables, constants, pointers, and even other data structures.

class Player
{
int posX;
int posY;
int health;
etc...
}

It's just a definition. In order to use a class, you have to create an instance of it.

Player PlayerOne;
Player PlayerTwo;

PlayerOne and PlayerTwo are now objects. Since the main idea behind C++ is to use class definitions to model objects and their behaviors, we call it object oriented programming.


#5036914 'averaging out' the colour of a texture?

Posted by MrDaaark on 26 February 2013 - 05:48 PM

http://blog.patdavid.net/2012/06/getting-around-in-gimp-color-curves.html


#5036592 Any point Learning XNA?

Posted by MrDaaark on 25 February 2013 - 10:32 PM

Once you learn the basics, languages and APIs like XNA become interchangeable. Learn with whatever you like.


#5036462 Infringement of remakes and their component parts (engine, plugins, data)

Posted by MrDaaark on 25 February 2013 - 03:19 PM

I don't know why you think adding layers of abstraction will stop you being held responsible for committing an act. There is no difference between kicking someone, and building a rube-goldberg device to do it for you. It's still an act of assault.

You can't say 'at which point does the assault occur?'. It doesn't matter. There is only the originator of an action, and the result. Regardless of the abstractions or complications, you're still responsible.

That being said, it's a shame when people waste so much time, talent, and work trying to copy someone else's work. Especially when they do a good job, and could have had an awesome project of their own.




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