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Glass_Knife

Member Since 08 Aug 2001
Online Last Active Today, 10:33 AM

#5219687 How do you motivate yourself for game design?

Posted by Glass_Knife on 27 March 2015 - 01:19 PM


Also, what kind of schedule did you make for efficient learning and practice of game design?

 

The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality. His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: fifty pound of pots rated an "A", forty pounds a "B", and so on. Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only one pot - albeit a perfect one - to get an "A". Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity. It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles of work - and learning from their mistakes - the "quality" group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay.

 

Art & Fear: Observations On the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking Paperback – April 1, 2001 by David Bayles), Ted Orland

 

Game design is like hunting werewolves.  You can't make a schedule or follow rules.  There are none.  

 

Go.  Do.




#5219120 Why didn't somebody tell me?

Posted by Glass_Knife on 25 March 2015 - 12:38 PM

Much like bugs, sometimes you learn about something that everyone else knows and just assumes you know.  And you think, "Why didn't somebody tell me?"

 

For example, I've been saying "for all intensive purposes" my whole life, only to discover the phrase is actually "for all intents and purposes".

 

Also, my wife just informed me that the song "Take me to church" is about secret sex stuff.  Whaaaaaaat?

 

Anyway, please post away.  I bet you're not the only one who didn't know.

 

My real one is:  Java has a string formatter for platform specific carriage returns.  


System.out.format( "Debugging var: %s%n", value );  // %n ??? All this time...



#5218832 Any advice for Ludum Dare music generation

Posted by Glass_Knife on 24 March 2015 - 11:11 AM

So I'm doing the next Ludum Dare.  They have a list of software to use to make music.

 

http://ludumdare.com/compo/tools/

 

Does anyone have any experience with these or others?

 

Before you ask, I've been playing piano for 30 years and was a professional musician for 10, so no worries about that stuff.




#5218788 Pixel Art Sprites - An Overused Art Style?

Posted by Glass_Knife on 24 March 2015 - 09:38 AM

If you're an indie programmer with no budget for an artist, then pixel art is a good way to go.  Are there lots of bad games with pixel art?  Yes.  But there are bad games with great textures and lighting too.  

 

I like what you're doing there with the thin lines around the big pixels.  

 

On the other side, I've seen people post that they are sick of pixels and ignore any games that have this style.  

 

1.  If your game has good balance, is fun to play, and does something new, then the graphics just need to be "good enough" so it doesn't look cheap and dirty.

2.  Who is your audience?  If you're going for a market that is saturated and sick of pixels then you need something else.  If not, then go for it.

3.  You can always get a great alpha version with people playing it and then find a friend to do the art.  




#5218556 What's a good 2D game engine to learn after C++/SDL?

Posted by Glass_Knife on 23 March 2015 - 01:09 PM


I will start with 2D then make my way into 3D.

 

I say, since you're going to transition to 3D, why not go with Unity (which will do both)?

Another benefit is you get to learn a new language for scripting: C#, UnityScript, or Boo.




#5217364 LibGDX or Unity for my next game with my coding background

Posted by Glass_Knife on 18 March 2015 - 09:30 AM

I think the biggest differences between then (ignoring the price) is that libGDX creates projects.  You have to configure your IDE, mess with gradle, and write all the code in Java,

Unity IS the IDE.  I think you will find, once you understand how to add scripts and variables to the editor and are able to edit them while the game is running, why Unity is different.

 

I give a +1 for Unity.




#5217348 LibGDX or Unity for my next game with my coding background

Posted by Glass_Knife on 18 March 2015 - 08:29 AM

Here's what I would do:

 

Take one or two weeks and create some tech demos in libGDX.  Deploy them to the platforms you wish to support and test them out.

Take the same amount of time and create the same stuff with Unity.  Deploy them and test them out.

 

Then pick the one you like.  In a few years these tools will be replaced by different tools.  There is no correct answer.  No one here understands you skills, desires, or anything else.  I could tell you what I would pick, but does that matter?

 

They are both popular tools.




#5216670 How to check application version with HTTP GET?

Posted by Glass_Knife on 15 March 2015 - 11:59 AM

 

That is a terrible name.  dry.png




#5216628 2D AABB Collision resolution and collision system/class design

Posted by Glass_Knife on 15 March 2015 - 08:52 AM

It sounds like you're on the right track.  Have you read this?  http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/131790/simple_intersection_tests_for_games.php




#5216625 How to check application version with HTTP GET?

Posted by Glass_Knife on 15 March 2015 - 08:34 AM


Microsoft's cross-platform REST toolkit is also pretty darn rad.

 

What is the name of this?




#5216624 How to check application version with HTTP GET?

Posted by Glass_Knife on 15 March 2015 - 08:34 AM

+1 for libcurl




#5216079 Best programming paradigm for noobs?

Posted by Glass_Knife on 12 March 2015 - 10:07 AM

The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality. His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: fifty pound of pots rated an "A", forty pounds a "B", and so on. Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only one pot - albeit a perfect one - to get an "A".

Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity. It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles of work - and learning from their mistakes - the "quality" group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay.

 

Art & Fear: Observations On the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking Paperback – April 1, 2001

by David Bayles

 

 

Get in there and code.  I've written software in C, C++, Java, Python, Scheme, ML, Javascript, and C#.  Every one of those languages is just different enough to have different good and bad features.  Depending on your problem, you can pick the one you need.  But you can't expect to do that at first.  

 

I assume because you're asking this on Gamedev you want to make games.  So pick a language and an Engine and make some games.  Buy a book, watch videos, read tutorials.  Some options are:

 

Java - LWJGL: http://www.lwjgl.org/

Java - libGDX : libgdx.badlogicgames.com/

C++ - SFML : www.sfml-dev.org/
Python - pyGame : pygame.org/
 
Unity uses variants of C#, Javascript, and Python.
 
Pick something and try it out.  Go make lots of bad pottery!



#5215907 how much time it takes to arrive?

Posted by Glass_Knife on 11 March 2015 - 02:15 PM

Can't you just set both computers to the same NTP server and use one time-stamp at the start, one at arrival, and one on return?

 

t0 ------------> t1 -----------------> t2

 

time to get there = t1 - t0

time to come back = t2 - t1

total time = t2 - t0

 

Or am I missing something?




#5214764 CopyOnWriteArrayList

Posted by Glass_Knife on 05 March 2015 - 10:40 AM


ConcurrentModificationException inside mouseMoved().

 

This is a terrible exception name.  Not only can you modify something in two different threads, but just iterating over the collection and trying to change something can cause this.  It may not have anything to do with multiple threads.




#5214248 Tool for graphic prototyping

Posted by Glass_Knife on 03 March 2015 - 11:09 AM

http://www.pixelprospector.com/graphics-programs/

 

Here's a good list of tools to get you started.  Now go pick something and try it out!






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