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3Ddreamer

Member Since 04 Aug 2012
Offline Last Active Jul 19 2014 12:07 PM
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#5078945 Unity vs XNA

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 19 July 2013 - 10:04 AM

To make a typical AAA quality popular game or game engine takes years even with a team, starting from scratch to end-user, so nobody should feel bad about abandoning the game engine jungle.  




#5075059 Sharring your games

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 03 July 2013 - 10:32 AM

Hi,

 

 

At some point, you can use this software after you have an executable already made to start your game.  It allows you to pack your whole application - game in this case - into one executable.  No need to install your game in the client computer because merely opening the executable will run the game from almost any folder or file in the client, including the Desktop. It allows the user to make a shortcut to Desktop if wanted.  If the end-user (your friend in this case) wants to drag and drop the package to another location, then it will run from there immediately after opening the package executable. Getting it to your friend is as simple as an email attachment or other means of delivering it to the client, then they can place the package containing your game anywhere they want by dragging it to the desired folder/file and opening it at any time to run the game. (Note: Once the shortcut is made from it, moving the package might break the shortcut, but the end-user can quickly make another shortcut to Desktop or somewhere else. If the shortcut is dragged to another place, then it may or may not work.  I have had both cases happen.)

 

http://www.smartpacker.nl/smartpackerpro.html

 

 

Note:  The end-user may need the compatible runtime within the same O.S. framework as you developed the game.  (Windows Operating System version does not matter for over 95% of situations here, but the .NET Framework version does matter.) For example, if you developed the game using a computer and development environment with .NET Framework 4.0 then the end-user needs .NET Framework 4.0 or higher for all your coding to function as you intended it.  It might not run completely or even start if the framework is not compatible, though this seldom happens. Your friend may search in the Windows folder to see if he/she has the same or higher number framework.  There are some programs available for the end-user to know if they have a compatible framework and if not it will install the one needed. As an alternative, the end-user could make sure to go to the company website, download the latest framework, and have the download installer install it.  Most people should have what is needed if they run updates for Windows, so have your friend receive the packaged game and try to run it from where they want to store it . Only after it ran in your computer but not his/her, then that person would handle the framework compatibility issue.

 

What framework was the basis for your game development?  Your end-user needs that or higher number framework.

 

Once you get your game to have an executable to start it, then sharing it is relatively easy in most cases.




#5074925 Advices for a student completely new to game dev

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 02 July 2013 - 09:00 PM

I am totally convinced that most people new to game development should choose a game engine which fits their genre goal for games and their preferences, but some with no art abilities might want to consider an SDK instead like SharpDX, for example.  After a game engine is selected, then focus on learning the main language of the engine and since you have programming experience in other languages, too, pick one for things like GUI creation and gameplay functions. You may need to learn a couple new languages for a certain development environment.

 

Now, that being said, there is a huge market for browser and/or hand-held mobile device games.  Java programming coming soon for you and much of the experience of yours is very good for that area to get started.

 

Here is a list of game engines:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

 

There are many game engines, rendering engines, SDKs, and coding libraries not on the above list, but this will give you something in your search.

 

I suggest that you go to the Android main gaming community website and related sites to read about what game engines or SDKs that they use.

 

Links:

Another similar topic here at gamedev...   http://www.gamedev.net/topic/632323-android-game-development-where-should-i-start/

Android Developers site:  http://developer.android.com/index.html

 

So, start with the main sources of information and research from there. 

 

Have fun! smile.png




#5069022 Having trouble putting all aspects of game dev together

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 11 June 2013 - 10:06 PM

Hi,

 

Much of what you seek is satisfied by using a memory managed language. You need to learn classes, executables, and version (source) control.  Much of the other questions which you ask varies considerably in many ways from game to game and from game engine to game engine.  Choosing a comprehensive game engine like Torque 3D for example would clarify a lot of things.  If you don't want a game engine but want to program games more directly in a computer then you either need to target a runtime environment directly or exploit a graphics API - Direct3D or OpenGL.  Look at SharpDX as an example.

 

List of game engines:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines  (There are many more game engines and graphics engine out there but these are most of the popular and well developed ones).

 

Typically a game has classes for most or all of everything.  GUI, physics, objects such as characters, vehicles, and land environment (usually called simply "Map") may each have their own classes. Each of these classes could be a major folder in the main directory of your game or be an executable application instead there. The startup and setup executables, like the names imply, are typically responsible for setup and configurations of the game - Setup.exe for example - or starting the game which makes the clock start, GUI appear, scene graph begin running and then all objects and game functionality loaded into the scene - gamename.exe for example or start.exe sometimes.  When everything is ready then the player may use the GUI to do tasks and start to play.  Most game engines have kinds of templates in all these major areas already in place which usually require knowledge in the programming language to customize functionality or build on what exists in there.  If you do not have a game engine or at least some libraries in these areas then you must create all of this and much more yourself.   Almost everybody new to game development needs to make games that are so simple that they do not have any executable files.  An exception would be the programmer who has made executables in the language though not game related.

 

Low level programming is mostly far beyond the ability of an inexperienced programmer so it is very important to start very simple.   You really need to make some console type games such as Tic-Tac-Toe, crossword puzzle, Trivia Pursuit, Scrabble, and so forth. I'd say my standard 3 to 5 of these.  Also, non-game applications such as simple database, letter display application, simple encoder, index with scroll, easy GUI, image loader, file loader, text box display, and so on will give you coding experience - all of which will be used eventually in game development.  

 

By the way, we always need to know what is the language that you are using if you are going to ask these kinds of questions. smile.png




#5068471 3ds max extended "customized" "primitives"

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 09 June 2013 - 02:04 PM

Hi,

 

There is way to do this in Max and it is too clumsy and time consuming to me, so I use Wings 3D to merge many things, including scenes, but sometimes the basic info is merged and things like shaders added later.  Blender can merge scenes but I have never used it for that. It is so important to get as much of the geometry done as possible - preferably all - before even working with a UV map and/or textures, materials, and shaders among other things.

 

Blender, 3DS Max, and Wings 3D are all used by me based on workflow pipeline needs.  I even on occasion use Deep Exploration, Milkshake 3D, or plug-ins for 3D programs such as Panda and Collada.  You will eventually be forced to expand to other programs, too, so the sooner you get accustomed to several programs the better for you.  This strategy will open your creativity and innovation to amounts achievable only this way.

 

Clinton




#5066797 Designers, tell me what is this difference I'm feeling...

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 01 June 2013 - 08:11 PM

Hi,

 

 

Yes!  You are not hallucinating!

 

People are making changes to the feel of game functions all the time.   Different artists and tech people, new or revised game engine, and the need to handle game function afresh with each new release all have an effect.  Similarities do exist from the same libraries occasionally being used by different game developers.  There is a tendency for creative teams to emulate the game feel of other popular games.  Sometimes a better character game function will actually disappoint the gamers only because they are used to the feel, function, and configuration of other games. 

 

There is variety and few things are static in game development for very long, so game function is fluid, too, to some extent. The exact same issues have been discussed by people many times.  It is good for a game developer or game designer to be sensitive to this area of gameplay.




#5066296 Starting C#

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 30 May 2013 - 09:06 PM

Hi,

 

In my opinion, an experienced programmer such as you should not detour but focus on target of making simple games soon!  Visual Studio Express is the way to go for your first few games.  Start with DirectX API in the .NET Framework and make your first "Hello World" using C# with this to get familiar with it.  There are plenty of tutorials on how to do this. Next find tuturials on making simple games with the DirectX API and scripting in C#.  Example are crossword puzzle, tic-tac-toe, and quiz question games. After 3 to 5 of these then you will be ready for a game development framework...

 

Next look at SharpDX, MonoGame, Mono/MonoDevelop, and XNA. 

 

Keep working at it and have fun!




#5065928 Im new and looking for Language + Framework to start with.

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 29 May 2013 - 02:16 PM

If this is only a hobby, then stay the @#%*#!! away from C++.




#5065152 Looking for some guidance.

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 26 May 2013 - 11:59 PM

Well, a library can be a source for custom coding, editors and other tools included with the coding, and then your work is compiled into an executable application running within your game and often in synchronization with other ones.  Things such as scene graphs, clocks and "triggers", or mission scripting like in combat games can be used to tie the varies libraries together.  Eventually you need to decide the core construct which will run your game.  Many have one but some have several working together.  The tremendous advantage of most game engines is that the editors and other tools to create this basic game construct is proven and provided for you to use for coding.  Instead of you having to write a mission editor or data base, for example, these are often provided or recommended to you in already existing libraries.

 

An alternative is to write code which depends on an interpreter and often this is easier for the beginner to grasp.  In this case then you definitely should work with an already existing system of game engine, because writing the interpreter is beyond the ability of inexperienced coders.

 

It is a good strategy for any and all aspiring game developers to get some experience with text and algorithm coding of simple programs before entering the jungle of game development. 

 

Choose a game engine or development environment first, use the primary language of that system, work with making simple programs for a while, then expand into game development after a few months of fundamentals.

 

Without the editors, special tools, and coding of the libraries done for you already, it is a very tall order and much limiting to do it all yourself. Much time is saved in going the prescribed way of a game development environment.




#5065146 Taking almost ALL the credit?

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 26 May 2013 - 11:33 PM

Hi,

 

Discuss this with them - simple.




#5065112 Beginner here, need a starting off point

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 26 May 2013 - 07:31 PM

How much graphical imagery will there be?  If you have a lot of art assets planned, then I say use a game engine such a jMonkey.

 

If you want to use vector graphics only, which can be created by even an early stage programmer with a lot of work spent on it, then you would have something easy to size on most or all device display screens and better lend itself to cross-platform.  With vector graphics, then a Java IDE would be okay.  If I went that route, then I would target the Java Runtime Environment and give the player the option to install the JRE downloaded with the game as you prepared it for the user. Packaging the JRE with the game is fine as long as you notify the user of the option to install it or deny it and display the license agreement.  This JRE implementation makes Java developed games very cross-platform, perhaps the easiest way for the Java programmer to implement cross-platform.

 

There are many Java based communities for 2D game development, for both game engine and IDE there are many, especially text heavy usage games with IDEs or kits.

 

Before you start making games, you need to use Java to code 3 to 5 simple applications such as data base, letter display/editor, index with scroll, and encoder.  These are essential skills learned for the long term by any game developer.  They also have the advantage of giving you experience to create code which can be reused in your strategy game.




#5065108 Im new and looking for Language + Framework to start with.

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 26 May 2013 - 07:00 PM

For only a hobby, Blender is hard to beat.  Also look a GameMaker. 

 

XNA is mature but not dead.  The reason why development on XNA has stopped is because it is mature.  Games made in XNA will run for years in the future, so it is still alive.  There are still many people using XNA, too. 

 

MonoGame, an implementation of XNA, might be a better choice for the community support, and perhaps better implementation on a particular platform that you want to target.

 

Mono/ MonoDevelop are worth having a look. Unity 3D has some C# native coding, too. In fact it was derived from Mono.

 

Torque 3D comes with many art assets available for free or low cost.  You would need to learn programming, but the community support is there.

 

For just a hobby, it is really hard to find better than Blender.




#5062339 Help a Newbie Choose a Program Language

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 16 May 2013 - 12:10 PM

Hi,

smile.png

 

 

 

Hi,

 

 

An orderly growth in your learning is crucial for maximum efficiency and saving you years of delay.

 

1) Choose a game engine that allows you to develop a game using one language.

2) You will be using that language for the next 1 to 2 years.

3) Make 3 to 5 simple console type 2D games without a game engine by using your language and targeting the Runtime Environment in your client computer which you use.

4) Return to the game engine of your choice and make 3 to 5 simple 2D games. 

5) Begin making 3D games.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

 

Note:  Early in your first few games you should be on track to start and improve your interface making skills, which is one of the fundamentals of game development and critical for user appeal.

 

If you make each game well, adding new features, then this is the fastest path to becoming a skilled game developer as I outlined here.  In fact it is better than Uni but requires stronger character traits in you.

 

Stay at it and have fun the whole way! smile.png

 

Hello 3Ddreamer,

 

Sorry if I'm hijacking this thread at all, but I'm also on topic with the OP.

 

I'm also new to programming, I'm guessing I should start learning Python, but I'm interested in what you said and want to make sure that those "2-3" years you mentioned aren't wasted.  No 2-3 years was mentioned, so re-read my post, please.  I did recommend 1 to 2 years with your first language which was chosen by what game engine you selected.  How much total time from start to professional level depends on many factors including talent, time available, difficulty of the technology selected, and so forth.  Your language should be chosen based on the game engine that you select, in my opinion-for almost all newbies. Stay in that language until you get good at it before going deep into your second language in my opinion.

 

As for the list you mentioned, I saw that Minecraft was made using LWJGL, would learning Java and using that Engine be a good first step for a beginner or no?  Yes - Everything on this list would be good for learning purposes:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

 

Is there a book or an article that breaks down this whole experience (being a new programmer) better?  Chose a game engine and seek the information from the community forums of that game engine.

 

I'm not sure how the game engine and compiling and programming languages all work together.  I'd just like a simplified introduction or crash course so that I can understand the basics of this world I'm getting my self in to without having to waste time with bad advice or whatever bumps may be in the way.  The development pipeline for each game engine has a unique combination of technology and methods for the most part.  No universal formula exists across all game engines in regard to these matters of pipeline requirements.  Seek the game engine community forums of your choice.  Threads here at gamedev are very valuable in helping you get basics, some having tutorials.

 

Thank you,

Rob

 

 

Rob,

 

 

Take my advice in the dark red text above here.

 

The more research that you do by looking for threads about a wide range of game development topics, then the better you will be.  There are really few shortcuts and mostly just digging hard for things.

 

Research is the backbone of game development, so get used to it. smile.png

 

 

Clinton




#5061689 Enhancing graphics

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 13 May 2013 - 11:30 PM

Hi,

 

Textures from actual photographs (in digital file format such as Bitmap and JPEG) are typically the best to use, sometimes looking exactly like real life surfaces of objects.  Shaders and in particular procedural mapping of textures and shaders have come a long way but will likely never have the consistency of the good image texture mapping by an artist one at a time.  Humans can detect flaws and inferior appearance, but procedural generation of surfaces will never notice the things which the human mind can.  The disadvantage of "live" textures would be that creating many objects or much terrain is much more expensive in labor, time, and cost because each texture must be applied manualy if you want the very best.

 

On the other hand, I have worked with artists using procedurally generated surfaces which look realistic.  Development of these procedures can be time consuming of themselves but worth it for large scenes with many objects or much terrain.  Many games use both procedural and manual made surfaces, which allows the best technique for each need.

 

Get used to coding for both procedural and image applications.

 

 

Clinton




#5059886 Help a Newbie Choose a Program Language

Posted by 3Ddreamer on 06 May 2013 - 08:49 PM

Hi,

 

 

An orderly growth in your learning is crucial for maximum efficiency and saving you years of delay.

 

1) Choose a game engine that allows you to develop a game using one language.

2) You will be using that language for the next 1 to 2 years.

3) Make 3 to 5 simple console type 2D games without a game engine by using your language and targeting the Runtime Environment in your client computer which you use.

4) Return to the game engine of your choice and make 3 to 5 simple 2D games. 

5) Begin making 3D games.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

 

Note:  Early in your first few games you should be on track to start and improve your interface making skills, which is one of the fundamentals of game development and critical for user appeal.

 

If you make each game well, adding new features, then this is the fastest path to becoming a skilled game developer as I outlined here.  In fact it is better than Uni but requires stronger character traits in you.

 

Stay at it and have fun the whole way! smile.png






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