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Celiasson

Member Since 27 Nov 2012
Offline Last Active Oct 31 2014 01:53 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Need a good 2D graphics program

06 November 2013 - 05:00 AM

If you are looking for a grid based tool, PyxelEdit is pretty nice. It is still in beta, I believe, so the tools may vary in perfection, but it's pretty nice with automatic tiling and you can also create animations in it. It's a single developer developing the tool and from my experience he is really quick and helpful when asking for help in the forums. He also takes suggestions on new tools to implement or feedback on older tools.

The program costs $8 dollars minimum, totally worth it. Check the videos here and decide if this is something you need. I recommend it.


In Topic: Completely new to this... couldn't be more of a beginner.

26 October 2013 - 02:43 AM

What should I focous on for the art aspect of it?  Is it actully viable to hand draw and scan in images animating every frame my self? is a tablet for drawing to the pc the way to go? or is their another alternitive alltogether I should be looking into?

Thanks for the feedback

I'm not an artist, hell I can't even hold a pencil in a sexy fashion. Though I believe it is possible to scan in your hand drawn images I would rather recommend drawing everything on a tablet for the PC. Scanning can be...problematic. When drawing to the computer from the start you can do so much more and will have a very good quality from the start as well.

Furthermore I suggest that you start by mapping out the entire game before making anything else. Start up a document or a project planning board and start defining every aspect of your game. This includes the technical aspects such as targeted platform, programming tools, graphical tools, audio tools etc. If you just jump in and starts drawing or coding without knowing what you actually want to do you might have to redo everything you've done at some point. Knowing what game you are going to make will make it clear of what kind of knowledge you will need, what language you will write it in and what kind of graphical performance you can have, among other things.

During this defining phase of the game I would also recommend mood-mapping of graphics, gameplay elements and audio. The process of mood-mapping is to go out on the web and search for graphics, gameplay elements, and audio that represents the kind of feel and content style you want in your own game. That way it will be a lot easier to define the style in your game and at the same time make sure that the different assets, such as audio and graphics, mix well together. You could also play a few platformer fighter games and analyze them; Why was this platformer good/bad? Did I enjoy it? Why? What concepts can I take from this game and apply to my own? Can I make this concept even more fun by adding or removing something from it?

This is quite a thorough process that takes time and I believe a lot of hobby developers neglect it completely. I haven't made too many games, but I love this approach since it will give a nice overview and you already "create" your game on paper which is a rewarding accomplishment in itself. It will also make the development process a lot more maintainable once you start implementing the game.

Good luck, I hope I was of assistance!


In Topic: Is there a list of game engines pros and cons?

02 October 2013 - 02:55 AM

I haven't used GameMaker or RPG Maker, but as far as I know it's minimal coding when doing games on those developing platforms. Unity is nice, but making a 2D game in it is a bit of a hassle since it doesn't have any native support for 2D (it will have with the next release though!). Unity also requires a lot of coding and scripting. C++ with SFML is easy to use and learn - if you know C++ already. Will be a lot more coding than using unity. Unity is also in either C# or java.


In Topic: C++ DirectX 11 Problems

22 September 2013 - 02:50 AM

 

Well, there is a difference in how you set up the Direct3D device between DX10 and DX11. In DX11 they have split the device up into device and deviceContext so the set up is slightly different. Are you 100 % sure that you have done it correctly? Which Graphics Card do you have?

Yes, I'm 100% sure. I downloaded the VC++ project from Microsoft and directly opened it in VC++ 2010 Express. And I have some P.O.S. Intel HD Graphics Family card.

 

Here is a link to the different cards from Intel and what DirectX versions they support. Find out exactly which one you have and know for sure.

http://www.intel.com/support/graphics/sb/CS-033757.htm


In Topic: C++ DirectX 11 Problems

21 September 2013 - 11:22 PM

Well, there is a difference in how you set up the Direct3D device between DX10 and DX11. In DX11 they have split the device up into device and deviceContext so the set up is slightly different. Are you 100 % sure that you have done it correctly? Which Graphics Card do you have?


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