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Member Since 30 Nov 2012
Offline Last Active Feb 11 2014 04:58 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: student design portfolio: looking for some help

03 March 2013 - 08:47 PM

Pyroclast seems like a decent enough execution of a game from what I can see.  Assuming you were under some sort of time limit from the class.  Not sure how much level design there is in an old-school space shooter like that.  I'm guessing you set up the enemy positions and behaviors?  Hard to tell from just the pictures but a little experience in unity doesn't hurt.

 

Not sure about joy ride the video is pretty flashy without much (any?) gameplay.

 

Massteroid is awesome!  Sure it's a pretty simple game but that isn't always a bad thing.  It's a fun idea and there seems to be a good level of polish on it.

 

To get out of your rut I would focus on a slightly larger project or a smaller one where you assume more responsibility.  You don't want to bite off more than you can chew since you're working on a resume'.  Adding another finished, polished game to your resume' will be worth more than saying you're working on some awesome game.  It looks good, have fun, land an internship.


In Topic: Game Design Basis - help appreciated

28 February 2013 - 04:35 PM

I like the idea of this project if I'm understanding it correctly.  It sounds kind of like double dragon or final fight mixed with a jrpg-style town/love story.  I would be wary of feature creep though.  If this is an indie game I would advise against full voicework, even if you have piles of money lying around to pay voice actors to record multiple takes of possibly hundreds of lines of dialog.  The process of recording and overseeing the whole thing would be pretty monumental.  Even professional games are notorious for bad voice acting. The payoff vs the work hours spent on it isn't worth it in my opinion.

 

I would focus on finding the core features that make the game stand out and work on ways to make them better.  I think having 2 great features is better than having 5 average features.  I would think about ways to make being in the town an interesting experience with plenty to do.  You'll obviously be spending a lot of time fighting, as well, so that can't be a monotonous experience.  Using randomization and all the ways you can tie the fighting world back to the town may help keep this aspect from feeling like a chore.


In Topic: number of firearms in adventure/rpg (weak to strong scaling problem)

06 February 2013 - 05:44 PM

Honestly I think what you've described sounds fine.  It's all about the suspension of disbelief, and the way games have evolved has given us some wiggle room in this area.  For example, back in the day (and today in some cases), most players wouldn't think twice about seeing an enemy disappear after being killed.  It takes a small leap of faith on the players part and a small learning curve.  Watching dead things vanish is somewhat intuitive because in a sense, they are gone.  Letting them vanish was a small sacrifice to free up the resources for other things in the game. 

 

In your case the gameplay benefits far outweigh the learning curve and suspension of disbelief required for a player to accept this facet of your design.  Anybody who has played diablo would certainly be familiar with it.  In diablo they tie progressively better stats to progressively cooler graphics with progressively more impressive sounding names.  There's no reason you couldn't do this with guns.  You could just make up names that are similar to the real-world equivilant like BG-42 instead of AK-47.  It might be important to do this for copyright reasons as well?  This would also ensure you would never have to sacrifice gameplay in the interest of making damage and other attributes realistic since it's only based on that gun.


In Topic: Does the viewpoint of a game effect specific aspects of it?

23 January 2013 - 08:46 PM

Point of view has a huge effect on gameplay.  A couple interesting examples of this are Natural Selection and Supreme Commander.  Natural Selection is a multiplayer game where you play as part of a team trying to take control of strategic areas on a map from a FPS perspective.  By itself this is pretty standard but there is also one player on the team who acts as the commander and views the battle from a top-down RTS style view.  He directs his troops and aids them in battle.  So you end up with 2 very different gameplay experiences, yet they are both in the same game, trying to accomplish the same goal.  Supreme Commander is interesting because it has a strategic zoom feature.  Basically you can zoom all the way in to small skirmishes between a few units, or zoom all the way out and view your entire army.  In this way you can control tactical situations, flanking and manuevering your troops, as well as strategic situations like surveying your troops and deciding where you need reinforcements.


In Topic: Medieval RPG Ideas

17 January 2013 - 08:23 PM

It would be a ton of work to make something like this.  I really doubt somebody is gonna make it for you, better to dig in and learn how to make it yourself..eventually.  That being said I think it is a really cool idea.  I'm not a big fan of hunger systems in games.  They seem so hard to implement in way that is meaningful but not tedious.  I love the idea of being able to work your way up in both power and noteriety within the game. 

 

Would there be monsters to fight?  Do they drop money or treasure?  Balancing the economy could become difficult.  Would defeating stronger monsters give enough money  to make stealing or acquiring money in other ways pointless, or vice versa?  Would the urge to turn the whole thing into an mmo halfway thru the project be too strong to resist?


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