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0r0d

Member Since 19 Dec 2012
Offline Last Active Oct 09 2014 12:20 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Game development - where on Earth to start?

25 August 2014 - 01:22 AM

 

So can you suggest a starting point in game programming for me? According to my research, C++ seems like a good language for game programming (correct me if I'm wrong). Should I begin learning C++? If yes, can you recommend a book for it? And if no, what do I program in?

 

 

You certainly cant go wrong learning C++, which is the standard programming language in the games industry.  It will also introduce you to low-level concepts that you probably havent been exposed to in your previous development experience.


In Topic: Confused and lost

25 June 2013 - 03:00 AM

 

If you want to program a game you might want to concentrate on learning how to program first.  Knowing "a bit of java and python and C++" wont do.  Programming an entire game (even a simple 2D scroller) is very complex and requires a lot of knowledge of programming, math, graphics, not to mention all those little things like UIs, scripting, AI, managing assets, debugging, optimizing, etc, etc.  Using an engine like Unity will help and reduces the entry requirements, but you still need to have a solid knowledge of programming.

Fair enough, what would you say is the best laguage to start with for the type of game i want to achive.

 

It depends on many things, but... considering you want to put the game on Android and already know some Java... I'd go with that.  If you're going to use Unity, then maybe JavaScript might be the thing.

 

I'd concentrate on getting good with whatever language you choose.  If you want to use an engine (again, like Unity) then you can even practice the language while also getting familiar with the engine and doing small projects... each dedicated to learning some small aspect of game development.  I just wouldnt jump straight into trying to do a full game because it will be too much and will only make you frustrated and discouraged when you hit the eventual problems and realize how long it will take.


In Topic: C++ Games?

25 June 2013 - 01:58 AM

I want to know exactly what the market is like for games written in C++... Why is it that every time I find an Indie game worth playing it's usually written in Java?? Usually any games I see written in C++ come from big companies not Indie developers?

 

1. A lot of indie games are written in C++, either completely, mostly, or partly.

2. Sometimes indies use off the shelf engines which allows them to use scripting languages, but the engine and its tools are still written in C++

3. Most games are written in C++ because it's the standard language in the games industry, because studios already have lots of time and money invested into tools and tech written in C++, and because it's the only language supported in many platforms.  Even on something like iOS which is Objective-C, that's still sitting on top of C++ and C/C++ can be used independently of the Obj-C code.

4. The reason a lot of indies dont use C++ is because they are amateurs who are starting out and want to use the simplest and quickest to learn language that will get their game up and running, they dont have existing C/C++ tech and tools, and are not necessarily interested in portability of their code.


In Topic: Confused and lost

25 June 2013 - 01:47 AM

If you want to program a game you might want to concentrate on learning how to program first.  Knowing "a bit of java and python and C++" wont do.  Programming an entire game (even a simple 2D scroller) is very complex and requires a lot of knowledge of programming, math, graphics, not to mention all those little things like UIs, scripting, AI, managing assets, debugging, optimizing, etc, etc.  Using an engine like Unity will help and reduces the entry requirements, but you still need to have a solid knowledge of programming.


In Topic: Too many draw calls

24 June 2013 - 10:14 PM

 

 

What I gathered from my hours of googling is that I'd only need to redraw the buffer when something in it changes, but something in my head didn't click and I didn't realize I had 40,000 single buffers being drawn for 40,000 different cubes with over 300,000 vertices lol. It makes sense to me now though. I just thought all the drawing could be done at Initialization and I wouldn't have to deal with redrawing until input is recieved 

Normally you want to have the render loop running at some rate along with the update loop.  In most cases these happen in sync, but they can happen at different rates like for example if the drawing is slow but you want to keep a faster update frequency for physics or whatever.  If the scene is truly static, then technically you can just draw it once to the backbuffer and swap and then leave it there, but on at least some hardware it will choke if it doesnt get swaps every so often.

 

You might also have situations where a scene is static but only rendered as part of the bigger scene on screen... like if you have a monitor showing what's going on in another part of the level.  The image on that monitor can be a texture into which you drew that part of the level, but if that doesnt change then you dont have to update the texture... until something does happen.

 

My map isn't that complicated though. It's pretty static, except for some destroying and building of blocks. I see what you're saying and it makes sense, but for now I just need to get the map drawn on the screen in game time. Physics don't apply here yet

 

 

Just have a game loop that updates and renders the scene based on the current camera.  That's the simplest setup and all you need.


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