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0r0d

Member Since 19 Dec 2012
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 08:28 PM

#5300363 Copyright

Posted by on 12 July 2016 - 05:40 AM

You might want to talk to a copyright lawyer.




#5300112 Posibility of getting to game industry?

Posted by on 11 July 2016 - 04:05 AM

 

If someone comes in with solid C++ abilities and not too much else, it's assumed they'll pick up other things as needed. Whether that's justified or not, that is an intrinsic widespread attitude in the industry. It's never assumed that a junior hire will just pick up C++, so the company basically plans to have to train you for a while before you're capable. And if I'm choosing between the candidate I have to train or the candidate who is ready to go out of the gate, well... it can be overcome, but it's easier just to have that knowledge up front.


 

This comment is ONLY applicable to the game industry. There are many types of software development that don't have this expectation.

 

 

I'd disagree to some extent. If you have a strong expertise in a particular field that a games studio requires, i.e. maths/physics and you have coding experience but not C++ then I think said studio will assume you can pick up C++ on the job. I know a lot of seniors I've worked with in the past started out like this.

 

 

If you're hiring someone to work on the engine, or even gameplay if that's all c++, I just dont see that happening.  I've certainly never worked someplace where we would even consider hiring someone to work on c++ code who didnt already know c++.  I mean, getting someone to be fairly c++ proficient takes time, and why hire someone who has to sit there learning c++ for a long time before they can do anything?  And if by "pick up C++ on the job" means you want that person to be productive as they learn, then that also means having one of your senior engineers taking time to teach and mentor them, and they STILL wont be productive for a while... and certainly not deep in the engine where things will be complex and easy to mess up by someone who's just learning c++.




#5300090 Linux for game development

Posted by on 11 July 2016 - 01:11 AM

 

Why don't you just write the gameplay code in c++?

That's pretty much off-topic when it comes to choosing a linux repo...  :huh:

Why not ditch both and use Java? Because now we're in a language war thread :P

 

 

Well, I was not trying to start a "language war" or anything of the kind.  I know my question is not directly related to the OP's thread subject, but I am addressing something else he/she brought up in the post.  Since this is a forum for beginners, it's often the case that beginners dont always know the right questions to ask.  Or sometimes in the course of discussing one question something else comes up.  




#5300083 Linux for game development

Posted by on 10 July 2016 - 11:07 PM

Thanks for all the answers. With the help of all your wisdom i have chosen to start with Ubuntu. See how it turns out in a few days when I'm done screaming about learning the most basic things :).

 

 

 I will code in C++ and Lua and also use QT for user interface. 

 

Out of curiosity, why use Lua?  I mean, why not just use c++ for all your code.  What's the specific use case that you have that you need Lua for?

 

 

I plan to use lua for the gameplay code and c++ for the engine.

 

Why dont you just write the gameplay code in c++?




#5299939 Linux for game development

Posted by on 09 July 2016 - 11:19 PM

 

 

 I will code in C++ and Lua and also use QT for user interface. 

 

Out of curiosity, why use Lua?  I mean, why not just use c++ for all your code.  What's the specific use case that you have that you need Lua for?

 

 

There are several compelling reasons for embedding Lua as a scripting language.

 

 

My question was about the OP's specific situation.




#5299929 Linux for game development

Posted by on 09 July 2016 - 08:14 PM


 I will code in C++ and Lua and also use QT for user interface. 

 

Out of curiosity, why use Lua?  I mean, why not just use c++ for all your code.  What's the specific use case that you have that you need Lua for?




#5299867 Spring Compression from Rest Lenght and Real Length

Posted by on 09 July 2016 - 06:07 AM

Hooke's law:
F = -kx

Where k is spring constant(stiffness) and x is compression rate. So if the spring is compressed, the force will push each ends of the spring away. If spring is stretched, than it will pull each of the ends together. That's kind of clear.

However, I need to get the compression somehow. I have the rest length(in m) and the current spring length(in m) and I need to get the compression distance(in m).

Currently I do:

compression = rest_length - spring_length

However, I'm not sure if this is correct.

 

Seems like you want :

.

compression = spring_length - rest_length

.

So the variable x ("compression" in your code) is positive when you stretch the spring, giving you a negative force F, and vise versa when you compress it.




#5299852 Posibility of getting to game industry?

Posted by on 09 July 2016 - 01:41 AM

 

 

 

is a great, productive language to get a lot of things done in. But C++ gets you the jobs, not C#.

 
HI, just wanna know if this is kind of true? like for example the industry prefers c++ people?

 


Promit knows whereof he speaks.

 

When it comes to the game industry, it's simply an expected and generally required part of your skill set. It's been the standard for a very long time now, and there's a reasonably healthy supply of capable candidates with that feather in their cap. If someone comes in with solid C++ abilities and not too much else, it's assumed they'll pick up other things as needed. Whether that's justified or not, that is an intrinsic widespread attitude in the industry. It's never assumed that a junior hire will just pick up C++, so the company basically plans to have to train you for a while before you're capable. And if I'm choosing between the candidate I have to train or the candidate who is ready to go out of the gate, well... it can be overcome, but it's easier just to have that knowledge up front.

 

This comment is ONLY applicable to the game industry. There are many types of software development that don't have this expectation.

 

 

Just to expand a little.  C++ is the industry standard for games, and unless you're applying for a studio that specifically and exclusively works in another language like Objective-C, then it's just assumed that you know c++ and you will be grilled on it during your interview.  If you're applying for a senior position you might not be grilled, but for a junior position you will most definitely have to show that you're competent in it.

 

Also, to give you a better idea of what an interviewer is looking for when interviewing a junior engineer, here's basically what I look for (in roughly order of importance):

 

1.  C++ competency.  This is the deal breaker.  If you're not good with c++ I wont hire you.  If you're ok, we'll see.  If you're great, most likely I'll hire you.

2.  Problem solving.  I will ask you to solve problems that you should know how to solve, and problems that you shouldnt.  I want to see how you deal with both.

3.  General software engineering knowledge and hardware knowledge.

4.  3D math, and math in general.  If you're not good with math, you might be useful to me.  If you're great with math, you will almost certainly be useful to me.

5.  General game development knowledge.  If you dont know anything about games, engines, tools, data pipelines, etc, you might be useful.  If you do, your odds are much better.




#5299718 What Language Is Best For Game Programming?

Posted by on 07 July 2016 - 07:04 PM

I'd recommend trying to crawl before you run.  Maybe get an existing engine/tool like Unity and begin by making a game with that.  Maybe there's a better option for 2D games, I dont know since 2D pixel art games are not my thing, but you can ask here and I'm sure someone will help you.  But, you dont want to commit to doing this as your long term goal without first dipping your feet and seeing if you like it at all.

 

If you're using Unity (for example), then pick a language it supports like C#.  Once you make your first game or two, you will know a lot more about how games are made and whether you like it enough to continue.  At that point you could move on to something like C++ which is the industry standard.




#5294257 Open Source game to help me learn code arhitecture

Posted by on 30 May 2016 - 07:51 PM

Cheers for the answer! So would you think it would be wise to just ignore that for now and roll with my own intitution, and then after I am done just let someone do the quick code review?

 

What you can do is either just go ahead and write the game/engine and then look for advice, or come up with whatever ideas you think are reasonable and then post them here to get feedback before you start implementing it.  This way you can get a better understanding of what the pros/cons of that approach are, plus you might be some additional insight into how you might do it better, before you commit to it and then find out it was tragically flawed.

 

And I agree that looking at source code is not that useful.  What you need is some basic understanding of how things work and then you can use that to judge different approaches.  You gain this by practice and experience, but some advice before you start can lead you to gain experience that's more valuable rather than possibly just getting frustrated.




#5293503 Do you usually prefix your classes with the letter 'C' or something e...

Posted by on 26 May 2016 - 12:04 AM

I dont prefix my classes with anything.  My convention is that classes are capitalized and that's it.  Syntax coloring helps a lot in telling what's what, and along with context you dont need anything else.




#5290197 A general question.

Posted by on 04 May 2016 - 10:31 PM

Normally you'd write up a design doc that covers everything in the game to whatever level of detail you feel appropriate.  You'd want to give gameplay examples, with comparisons to existing games if you can, as well as mockups of levels, UI, etc.  That'd be the start.  Then you can proceed to trying to prototype the gameplay to see what works and what doesnt, with the understanding that you'll likely be iterating on the design for a while before you start trying to go into full production.




#5290006 A question for how game engines build their game code for game logic -_-?

Posted by on 03 May 2016 - 11:55 PM

@ 0r0d : 

 

How about making ONE game with your engine.  Then you can worry about "every genre" somewhere down the line.

 

umm I made a game with other engine so realized what structure I have to make for a wide use of every genre.

 

this structure is my engine can support various instructions ( like Script or VM or Compiler and so on ) or can be a core library.

 

If my engine could be like this , all of game makers can make all contents , UIs , logics.

 

I'm really not sure what you're asking.  It sounds like you already know enough to know what you want to put into your engine.  So just make the engine, then make a game.  If you're asking what's the best way to make an engine that will be great at every single type of game... there's no such thing.  Just decide what type of game you want to make, figure out what features the engine need, and then make that.




#5289990 A question for how game engines build their game code for game logic -_-?

Posted by on 03 May 2016 - 07:05 PM

 

 

@ frob : I just want that my engine can be a wide use engine for every genre.

 

 

 

How about making ONE game with your engine.  Then you can worry about "every genre" somewhere down the line.




#5289515 Question about Open World Survival Game Engines

Posted by on 30 April 2016 - 10:35 PM

In the end, they're doing what most dev teams do.  Go with the vision, don't bother listening to the customers.  And they've all paid the price.

Your intentions about listening to the customers are admirable, and you absolutely should.  But dont dismiss the notion of a "vision" outright.  I can tell you from experience that a game project without some sort of vision is a recipe for a big huge mess.  That vision can chance as you get feedback and as you iterate on the design, but the vision is what keeps people focused on finishing the game and what will make it unique.  The vision also tells you what's important and what isnt.  You'll need this when it comes time to start dropping features, characters, levels, etc.

 

Let me ask a hypothetical:

 

You go to Applebees.  You want a steak, fries, and a salad.  The waitress says "well we really want you to try our new sushi".  You've never had sushi, so you try it, but don't like it.  So you ask for your steak, fries, and a salad instead.  Then the waitress says "well we don't really want to go that direction with your dinner, you can have fish stew instead of that".  You don't want it, but you try the fish stew anyways.  It sucks as well and you never do get that steak, fries, and a salad.

 

You go to Airborne's.  You want steak, fries, and a salad.  We give you steak, fries, and a salad.  It was pretty good.  Then the manager comes by and asks if you'd like to see anything else added to the menu.  You say some ribs would be nice.  A LOT of the customer base agrees.  The next time you go to Airborne's, you see that they've added ribs.  So you get that.  And it's pretty good.  Then the manager comes by and asks if you'd like to see anything else on the menu.  You say some pig snout would be great.  But the customer base doesn't agree, so the next time you go, there's no pig snout.  BUT you can still get steak or ribs.  It's still a good place to eat.  You appreciate that they listened to you about the ribs.  There's things there you like to eat, and the management is very friendly.

 

Which restaurant do you go back to on a consistent basis?

I think a vision is more like having a menu.  You serve certain things, but not everything, and the things you do provide are cooked a specific way.  Not having a vision is like telling your customers "tell us what you want and we'll cook it for you".  This is a problem because very often people will come in with requests that your cooks just dont know how to make, or require ingredients that you dont stock, and if you try to stock enough stuff to make even half the people happy then your restaurant will be horribly inefficient and losing money like crazy.  Also, you may be able to cook all kinds of different things on demand, but none of it will be especially good because none of your cooks specialize in anything. 






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