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Uberwulu

Member Since 03 Mar 2013
Offline Last Active Apr 18 2015 06:42 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Game development - Software Engineering or CS?

13 April 2015 - 09:26 PM

SE, not CS.  Your advisor is clearly not an accomplished developer.

 

-A game developer, who pursued both degrees.


In Topic: Game Development Advice Along with Course Help

26 March 2015 - 04:58 AM

None of that makes you a game developer, not even a beginner one.  I second the above response.


In Topic: Future Game Development Question

10 January 2015 - 10:03 AM

I know that HTML and CSS aren't programming languages, and JS is some type of it, since it has programming syntax. And btw, i've seen pretty good browser games made with java script, and since it can be used in Unity Engine, it has to be pretty good.

You're making the classic correlation == causation mistake.  Saying that because JavaScript can be used for scripting in a good game engine, that it "has to be pretty good" for game development, is like saying you want to pursue making cars by learning woodworking, because some nice cars are made with a wooden dash, and therefore woodworking must be pretty good for automobile manufacturing.  The wooden dash isn't what makes the car work, and JS isn't what makes Unity work.


In Topic: Future Game Development Question

10 January 2015 - 08:45 AM

 

Short answer: No.  Those will do little to nothing to enhance your knowledge of game development or even software development in general.  It will give you some very limited web development knowledge, which is a whole separate field of study from software development that has some very slight overlap with it, and nothing more.

So what dо you recommend?

 

Basically what axefrog said.  Try to make a game.  The more you build, the more the fog will clear and you'll have more specific questions to ask.  Right now, the best I can do is tell you to figure out what platform you want to make games for (e.g. desktop PC & console or casual/mobile gaming), so you can figure out which basic tools you're going to need first (e.g. C++ and Visual Studio or Java and Android Studio).

 

HTML isn't a programming language.  It's a markup language (notice the "ML") for tagging content.  CSS isn't a programming language.  It's a style sheet language used for formatting content.  JavaScript is a scripting language used for short bursts of simple logic.  You can write game logic in JS, but it'd be silly to attempt to write the entirety of a game in it.  When you write code in HTML and CSS, what you're doing is not programming.  CSS cannot make a game.  HTML5 cannot make a game.  This is different from saying that HTML5 cannot be used to make a game, in the same way that XML can't make a game, but can be used in one (for example, as a config file).  If you're using the term HTML5 to refer a host of technologies that also includes CSS3, JS, all the browsers that support them, and any web APIs you connect to that do a lot of the backend work for you, then yes, you can write some very simple games utilizing some combination of these tools.

 

Java is a programming language.  It's good for writing your general enterprise applications, web applications, and used as a scripting language on top of game engines which are typically written in C++.  C# is a programming language.  It serves pretty much the same purposes as Java (and in my personal opinion, does it better).  C++ is a programming language.  It's good for writing pretty much everything, but especially for games and simulations (or anything else that's too performance-critical for a managed language like Java or C#).  In my experience as a software engineer and game developer, the mainstream IDE in use for desktop/console game development in C++ is Visual Studio.  The mainstream IDE in use for more general development with C# is Visual Studio, and with Java is Eclipse.  The mainstream IDE in use for Android development is Eclipse, but I'm seeing a shift toward Android Studio more recently (we use both at my company).

 

In any case, if you intend to do these things as a career working for a company, you should be pursuing them in school at at least a baccalaureate level.  If you intend to do these things as a side hobby or as an indie developer, then you may want to compare some existing game engines available for licensing/royalty fees, such as Unreal Engine 4 (my personal favorite) or Unity.


In Topic: Future Game Development Question

09 January 2015 - 05:58 PM

Short answer: No.  Those will do little to nothing to enhance your knowledge of game development or even software development in general.  It will give you some very limited web development knowledge, which is a whole separate field of study from software development that has some very slight overlap with it, and nothing more.


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