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Uberwulu

Member Since 03 Mar 2013
Offline Last Active Apr 18 2015 06:42 PM

#5219281 Game Development Advice Along with Course Help

Posted by Uberwulu on 26 March 2015 - 04:58 AM

None of that makes you a game developer, not even a beginner one.  I second the above response.




#5203289 Future Game Development Question

Posted by Uberwulu on 10 January 2015 - 10:03 AM

I know that HTML and CSS aren't programming languages, and JS is some type of it, since it has programming syntax. And btw, i've seen pretty good browser games made with java script, and since it can be used in Unity Engine, it has to be pretty good.

You're making the classic correlation == causation mistake.  Saying that because JavaScript can be used for scripting in a good game engine, that it "has to be pretty good" for game development, is like saying you want to pursue making cars by learning woodworking, because some nice cars are made with a wooden dash, and therefore woodworking must be pretty good for automobile manufacturing.  The wooden dash isn't what makes the car work, and JS isn't what makes Unity work.




#5203275 Future Game Development Question

Posted by Uberwulu on 10 January 2015 - 08:45 AM

 

Short answer: No.  Those will do little to nothing to enhance your knowledge of game development or even software development in general.  It will give you some very limited web development knowledge, which is a whole separate field of study from software development that has some very slight overlap with it, and nothing more.

So what dо you recommend?

 

Basically what axefrog said.  Try to make a game.  The more you build, the more the fog will clear and you'll have more specific questions to ask.  Right now, the best I can do is tell you to figure out what platform you want to make games for (e.g. desktop PC & console or casual/mobile gaming), so you can figure out which basic tools you're going to need first (e.g. C++ and Visual Studio or Java and Android Studio).

 

HTML isn't a programming language.  It's a markup language (notice the "ML") for tagging content.  CSS isn't a programming language.  It's a style sheet language used for formatting content.  JavaScript is a scripting language used for short bursts of simple logic.  You can write game logic in JS, but it'd be silly to attempt to write the entirety of a game in it.  When you write code in HTML and CSS, what you're doing is not programming.  CSS cannot make a game.  HTML5 cannot make a game.  This is different from saying that HTML5 cannot be used to make a game, in the same way that XML can't make a game, but can be used in one (for example, as a config file).  If you're using the term HTML5 to refer a host of technologies that also includes CSS3, JS, all the browsers that support them, and any web APIs you connect to that do a lot of the backend work for you, then yes, you can write some very simple games utilizing some combination of these tools.

 

Java is a programming language.  It's good for writing your general enterprise applications, web applications, and used as a scripting language on top of game engines which are typically written in C++.  C# is a programming language.  It serves pretty much the same purposes as Java (and in my personal opinion, does it better).  C++ is a programming language.  It's good for writing pretty much everything, but especially for games and simulations (or anything else that's too performance-critical for a managed language like Java or C#).  In my experience as a software engineer and game developer, the mainstream IDE in use for desktop/console game development in C++ is Visual Studio.  The mainstream IDE in use for more general development with C# is Visual Studio, and with Java is Eclipse.  The mainstream IDE in use for Android development is Eclipse, but I'm seeing a shift toward Android Studio more recently (we use both at my company).

 

In any case, if you intend to do these things as a career working for a company, you should be pursuing them in school at at least a baccalaureate level.  If you intend to do these things as a side hobby or as an indie developer, then you may want to compare some existing game engines available for licensing/royalty fees, such as Unreal Engine 4 (my personal favorite) or Unity.




#5203187 Future Game Development Question

Posted by Uberwulu on 09 January 2015 - 05:58 PM

Short answer: No.  Those will do little to nothing to enhance your knowledge of game development or even software development in general.  It will give you some very limited web development knowledge, which is a whole separate field of study from software development that has some very slight overlap with it, and nothing more.




#5199409 Where should I start learning game development?

Posted by Uberwulu on 21 December 2014 - 09:01 AM

Coincidentally years of industry experience really doesn't mean a thing when it comes to educating others. In fact, in many ways, the further you are from being a beginner, often it's hard to even relate to what being a beginner was like. It generally just means you know your stuff.. Nothing about your ability to teach others.

 

This implies that being a developer for any length of time erodes your ability to help others learn your craft, and therefore my insistence to learn C++, the industry-wide standard language of game development, is bad advice to give someone who wants a career in game dev.  This assertion lacks logic.  It is also insulting to aspiring students that they must be too stupid to learn to code a for-loop in C++ before they've done it in PHP or something first.

 

Before my current job I spent three years teaching programming students, and in my spare time today I still make C++ tutorials for beginners with overwhelmingly good reviews.  C++ was my first language too, so I know very well the struggles of learning it.  Learning an "easier" language first won't make it easier to learn C++, and in my teaching experience, more often than not encourages bad coding habits that you'll have to unlearn once you start using a real language like C/C++.

 

So back to the OP, if you want to make games, in a nutshell you'll need to know C++ and linear algebra.  There's much more to it than that, but that's where you start.




#5199354 Where should I start learning game development?

Posted by Uberwulu on 20 December 2014 - 09:06 PM

 

Beginners should almost never choose C++ which is too forgiving of bad coding habits

 

This is terrible advice.  C++ is NOT forgiving of bad coding habits, quite the opposite actually.  Other languages are, which is what makes them "easier" to use.  Knowing Python, Unity, or Unreal won't get you a career in game dev either.  You need to learn C++, so start there.  It's not too hard to learn as a beginner unless you're generally bad at programming anyway, in which case you won't end up in game dev either way.

 

Source: Myself - A software engineer for a game & simulation company with a degree in game development.




#5198517 0 experience in programming and game development

Posted by Uberwulu on 16 December 2014 - 06:59 AM

First of all, you don't even know what aspect of game production you want to do.  You say game development, but that implies software engineering.  You keep mentioning modeling and cinematics, neither of which have anything to do with software engineering or even each other.  Also, liking games doesn't make you a good software engineer any more than liking shampoo makes you a good chemical engineer.  Figure out what profession you actually want to do, then pick the specialty within it that has a strong job outlook.  Lastly, even if you do choose software development, keep in mind that game development is harder, typically pays less, and requires longer hours and more crunch time than ordinary software companies.  It will burn you out fast if you don't REALLY love what you do.  Lastly, stay in school, because the overwhelming majority of recruiters won't even look at you if you don't at a minimum have a baccalaureate level education in a relevant field of study.

 

Source: Myself. I'm a software engineer for a game & simulation company and I hold a degree in Game Development.




#5154315 Game Development - Where to start?

Posted by Uberwulu on 17 May 2014 - 01:12 PM

 

Have you tried Googling this question?  I mean, not like it's already been asked and answered a million times or anything...

Actually scratch that.  Don't go into game development.  If you can't be bothered to research issues yourself and instead expect everyone else to do the work for you, you're not going to make a good programmer.

 

I think you misunderstood the topic here. The OP was asking whether he should go with a regular CS course or a specialized game development one. Please read the question first.

 

I did.  No part of my post indicates that I didn't.  This question has been asked and answered countless times before.  You seem to have the same disability as the OP.




#5154114 Game Development - Where to start?

Posted by Uberwulu on 16 May 2014 - 03:06 PM

Have you tried Googling this question?  I mean, not like it's already been asked and answered a million times or anything...

Actually scratch that.  Don't go into game development.  If you can't be bothered to research issues yourself and instead expect everyone else to do the work for you, you're not going to make a good programmer.




#5121831 Best Laptop for Game Development

Posted by Uberwulu on 07 January 2014 - 12:28 AM

Laptop?  But why?!  I need at least 3 monitors to program comfortably.

 

In any case, for consumers, I recommend AMD video cards.  For developers, I recommend nVidia but ONLY because nVidia is harder to develop for (you can get away with a lot more from AMD cards where nVidia would otherwise crash).  nVidia makes cards more geared for gaming, but it doesn't matter how much performance you squeeze out if your game crashes, which is also more likely on nVidia.  Be sure to get a graphics card and monitor that supports the range of resolutions you intend to develop for.  Beyond that, there isn't much to recommend other than the usual trusted manufacturers (Corsair for memory, western digital for hard drives, etc.).  I'd say go no less than 4GB of RAM and no less than 1GB of graphics RAM and 500GB of hard disk space to fit all the software tools and assets on.  Screen real estate is a big issue for me, as I usually have multiple files open at once for editing, so I'd go for the largest screen you can afford, unless of course you have a handful of extra monitors you carry around with you.




#5121733 Asking for advice to start Game Development

Posted by Uberwulu on 06 January 2014 - 03:41 PM

Are you getting an education in software development?  If not, do that if you plan on actually working as a game developer.  Even if you just want to go indie and don't expect to make a living off it, a proper education is extremely valuable.  In the 2-ish years I knew I wanted to program games before I actually started school for it, I was a little all over the place and didn't know how to use source control, or 3D modeling tools, or Direct3D/OpenGL, or winsock, or even the Win32 API.  A real education will teach you how to write and utilize design docs, work on a team, meet TRC compliance, use source control (useful regardless if working on a team or solo), and get you free access to a wide range of software tools (IDE's like Visual Studio, modeling tools like Maya or 3DS Max, etc.) that you would otherwise have to pay a small fortune for.  Having knowlegeable instructors readily available to answer your questions quickly and accurately will also speed up your learning process.

 

If you flat out insist on doing this without an education, then there are a few must-have books.  If you're still relatively new at C++, then buy SAMS Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days (5th edition, not the newer ones as the authors are terrible).  It covers pretty much everything you need to know about C++, falling short on the STL.  For that, buy The C++ Standard Library, 2nd edtiion to complete your knowledge.  For the math you need to know to program real games, I recommend 3D Math Primer for Graphics and Game Development, 2nd edition.  To learn to work with the Win32 API to make simple Windowed applications, I haven't found any good books but MSDN can answer almost all of your questions.  You can start off in 2D if you want, but I found it easier to just learn in 3D and mimic 2D using quads when needed.  DirectX9 is the easiest way to learn 3D graphics (quick initialization, supported on more hardware, easier to use than D3D11, and DX extensions make it easier to start off with than OpenGL).  To learn DirectX9, I recommend Introduction to 3D Game Programming with Directx 9.0c, A Shader Approach.  To make large-scale games, you'll need a solid understanding of OOP and design patterns.  For that I recommend Game Engine Architecture, API Design for C++, and Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture.  To take advantage of C++11 multithreading features, I recommend C++ Concurrency in Action.  For game network programming, I haven't found one particularly great book, so I would recommend at least taking a class for network programming for that.  For the physics and collision detection needed in games, I recommend Game Physics Engine Development and Real-Time Collision Detection.

 

If you take the advice of others here and use someone else's engine, you'll do a lot of scripting, but you won't learn much about actual game development.  At best you'll learn how to script in some simple game mechanics, but you won't know jack about rendering, networking, input, audio, or any other core game technology.  If you just want to dabble and churn out a bunch of super simple games that you probably won't own enough rights to for substantial profit, then go for that.  Otherwise, I highly recommend pursuing a real education.

 

 

 

-A Game Developer




#5045550 Steps on How to Become a game Developer

Posted by Uberwulu on 22 March 2013 - 02:35 AM

You don't seem like a real game developer.  Do you have any credentials to share with your viewers, such as an education and industry experience?  I'm sure they'd like to know why you're someone they should listen to.




#5041663 Starting a game development team with people from school

Posted by Uberwulu on 10 March 2013 - 06:38 PM

So you want people to do work for you that normally pays in the range of $90,000 salaries, but you want them do it for free.  Then you want to capitalize on their work and hog all the profits to yourself.  What part of that plan do you think would be enticing to ANYONE else?  If you want to make money and not share it with anyone, then develop it yourself.  Seriously...




#5039927 Game development: list of books

Posted by Uberwulu on 06 March 2013 - 04:43 AM


Uberwulu, could you please tell me if Game Coding Complete 4th Edition is a very good book ?

Its summary/source code are really attractive ( architecture of the code for a game, event system/sub system, scripting with lua ... ) but I just wanted to have a comment from a reader.

 

Game Coding Complete 4th Editions is a great book, as were its predecessors.  It alone does not cover every aspect in as much depth as it deserves, but it does cover a lot.  Game Engine Architecture, API Design, C++ Standard Library, C++ Concurrency in Action, and the shader cookbook are all great tomes of wisdom that I found difficult to put down.  As a game/graphics programmer, the DirectX and OpenGL references are indispensable too.  If you buy anything, I'd buy these first.




#5039610 Game development: list of books

Posted by Uberwulu on 05 March 2013 - 12:03 PM

The game-specific books sitting on my shelf include the following:

 

Game Engine Architecture

Game Coding Complete 4th Edition

Real-Time Collision Detection

Artificial Intelligence for Games

Programming Game AI by Example

Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 9.0c (for graphics programming)

Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 11

OpenGL SuperBible 6th Edition

Programming 2D Games

Programming a Multiplayer FPS in DirectX

Creating Games with Unity and Maya

OpenGL 4.0 Shading Language Cookbook

Real-Time Rendering 3rd Edition

Character Animation with Direct3D

OpenGL Programming Guide 7th Edition

Game Physics Engine Development

Cross Platform Game Development

Mathematics and Physics for Programmers

AI Techniques for Game Programming

 

The non-game-specific books include:

 

Effective C++

Effective STL

Data Structures and Algorithms Made Easy

Data Structures for Game Programmers

Design Patterns

Pattern Oriented Software Architecture (5 volumes)

Introduction to the Boost C++ Libraries

The Boost C++ Libraries

SAMS Teach Yourself UML, XML, C#, SQL, some other basic stuff here.

Cross-Platform development in C++

C++ GUI Programming with Qt 4 2nd Edition

Advanced Qt Programming

Component Software

Debugging

Advanced Windows Debugging

C++ Template Metaprogramming

Advanced C++ Metaprogramming

TCP/IP Illustrated, V1: The Protocols

The C++ Standard Library

API Design for C++

C++ Concurrency in Action

 

That's all I can think of at the moment.






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