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FlyingSatin

Member Since 20 Aug 2013
Offline Last Active Apr 02 2014 08:15 PM

#5128908 Accepting BitCoin As Payment And Its Implications

Posted by FlyingSatin on 04 February 2014 - 09:12 PM

I, like a lot of people on this website, develop games. I was thinking about different payment options, and was considering PayPal. I don't want anything complicated where I have to make calls, verify tax ID number, register locally, etc. I just want a simple system, and I'm not sure if PayPal is what I want.

 

Would BitCoin be a suitable payment system for a game? The game itself is completely free, but to get a premium account you have to go to the website and register for around 5 USD. This provides a bunch of cool stuff I won't go into. I am just wondering what you think about BitCoin as payment and the legal/customer satisfaction implications of using BitCoin. What about hybrid BitCoin/PayPal? Are there any other CC services that would be relevant to me?




#5125769 Developing a community around my game.

Posted by FlyingSatin on 22 January 2014 - 07:53 PM

Here are my suggestions in a linear fashion but in no particular order:

 

- Make YouTube videos of your game with you playing it. Be sure to have a personality.

- Implement a gameplay mechanic or two that has never been done.

- Make a "sub-reddit" on Reddit.

- Post on 4chan.

- Get people on YouTube who have garnered a large following playing games to play your game.

- Get a website to review your game.

- Implement a multiplayer system in the game.

- Minimize the bugs in the game software.

- MAKE THE GAME FUN.




#5125550 Need Help Choosing My Path!

Posted by FlyingSatin on 21 January 2014 - 09:30 PM

Believe it or not, there is a huge difference between if you want to learn programming and make games or want to learn programming to make games. The difference being that in the first situation you are equally passionate about both game dev'ing and programming (separately passionate) and want to pursue them both. In the second situation, you are interested in programming, but this as a means to your goal to make games. I have totally separate advice for whichever one you are. Neither way of thinking is better.

 

If you want to learn programming and make games, then I would recommend installing GNU/Linux and using C to start making programs using legendary tools like GCC, make, GNU nano, bash, Emacs, GDB, GNU/Linux itself, etc. This is a whole different topic, but there is still something I must address. I will definitely get a lot of flak here for recommending what I just did, but honestly if you learn this stuff, everything else is just easier and not superstitious. You can then learn C++ if you want to fit in with everyone else, once your projects become too big for C (you can judge this based on what is comfortable size for you). You don't have to use C++ for large projects, it's all preference. C code is valid C++ code, but not vice versa (its like C is the inside layer of a C++ onion). Some might recommend you stick with something like Python, Lua, or Java on Windows ($indows), but if you are passionate about programming separate from games, you might as well learn the mainstays and norms of the modern PC.

 

If you want to learn programming, but programming is just a part of your path to making games, ignore the above paragraph. That would be torture if you really didn't want to learn the stuff. Just go grab something like Unity 3D and use JavaScript, Python, C#, etc. as a scripting language. This is a perfectly legitimate way of making games. I don't care what people say, this is the best option for pretty much all indie devs. The only reason people like me prefer writing our own code is because it is just fun, once you get the train rolling. When using a ready-to-use solution, you also get to sit back in your chair with a pretty HD 3D game after a day or two of work with pride and achievement, whereas going for a homegrown approach you can sit back with pride over your 3D (extremely buggy) game that frequently crashes and has caused you to lose half of your hair (this all after 2 months).

 

Overall, you have some very productive times available to you. Kids have lots of energy at your age, and they also have lots of time. Respond if you want me to elaborate on anything I said.




#5094082 (HELP) The Noobie beginnings. Struggles in beginning Game Programming.

Posted by FlyingSatin on 14 September 2013 - 03:50 PM

Believe it or not, there is a huge difference between if you want to learn programming and make games or want to learn programming to make games. The difference being that in the former situation you are equally passionate about both game dev'ing and programming (separately passionate) and want to pursue them both. In the latter situation, you are interested in programming, but this as a means to your goal to make games. I have totally separate advice for whichever one you are. Neither way of thinking is better.

 

If you want to learn programming and make games, then I would recommend partitioning or wiping your HDD and installing GNU/Linux and using C to start making programs using legendary tools like GCC, make, GNU nano, bash, Emacs, and GNU/Linux itself. This is a whole different topic, but there is still something I must address. I will definitely get a lot of flak here for recommending what I just did, but honestly if you learn this stuff, everything else is easier and not superstitious. You can then learn C++ if you want to fit in with everyone else, once your projects become too big for C (you can judge this based on what is comfortable size for you). You don't have to use C++ for large projects, it's all preference. C code is valid C++ code, but not vice versa (its like C is the inside layer of a C++ onion). Some might recommend you stick with something like Python, Lua, or Java on Windows ($indows), but if you are passionate about programming separate from games, you might as well learn the mainstays and norms of the modern PC.

 

If you want to learn programming, but programming is just a part of your path to making games, ignore the above paragraph. That would be torture if you really didn't want to learn the stuff. Just go grab something like Unity 3D and use JavaScript, Python, C#, etc. as a scripting language. This is a perfectly valid way of making games. I don't care what people say, this is the best option for pretty much all indie devs. The only reason people like me prefer writing our own code is because it is fun, once you get the train rolling. You also get to sit back in your chair with a pretty HD 3D game after a day or two of work with pride and achievement, whereas doing things like above you can sit back with pride over your 3D HD (extremely buggy) game that frequently crashes and has caused you to lose half of your hair (this all after 2 months).

 

Overall, you have some very productive times available to you. Kids have lots of energy at your age, and they also have lots of time. High school is a lot easier than university and you still probably have some productive time on your hands. I would recommend maybe taking classes like calculus and physics (especially if your school has an AP program) so that you can build experience in things that you may not think relate to programming and games, but do indeed. Respond if you want me to elaborate on anything I said.




#5093671 What programming language to use?

Posted by FlyingSatin on 12 September 2013 - 04:26 PM

YES YES YES! A BEGINNER WHO USES LINUX! Take your pick as far as what language you want to use. I use C, but you don't have to. Also, don't take that as a recommendation. Just go with your flow and personal zen, and you can find your inner language. This could be Perl, Python, Haskell, C, C++ (eww), Java (ewwwwwww), JavaScript, Vala, C-UP, etc. etc. etc.




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