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Shade.

Member Since 23 Oct 2013
Offline Last Active Dec 02 2013 02:20 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Spheroid

04 November 2013 - 11:27 PM

Lol Hey there man. Just let me say thank you for bothering to try it out. The responses below are just to answer your questions. They are "not" legitimizations as to why the game plays the way it does. 

The robot sword swinging animation is...there because that portion is supposed to be replaced by an opening cut scene, but we just had that as a place holder.

From Soy Sauce is the name of our group who made the game. The name is a spin off of PlayStation's "FromSoftware". We all liked soy sauce so it became our name. 

There is full screen if you read the text document then it tells you how to do it. We just thought some people might not want it in full screen initially. 
 

The menu is not really finished, so we just made the 3 missions accessible and playable right from the main menu.  

And we have decided that there will be a simple, almost tutorial level, at the beginning of the game to slowly get you accustomed to how to play it. 

 

In that mission you are a commander- 

 

We thought that people would read the controls in the main menu, and learn how to control the game from there. We made the controls as simple as we could. But we also realized, again, people don't read controls, and we again just need to ease them in with that tutorial level.

 

The sword is one weapon, if you scroll up and down on the mouse you can change to a different weapon that has range. 

 

You probably missed the enemy in front of you if he didn't die. 

 

Alright, so do you have any specific recommendations then?
Thanks again for your time man-

-Shade-


In Topic: has anyone here released a game that got no attention and make you depressed...

04 November 2013 - 11:13 PM

So for the exact reasons that you did not find our games enjoyable is probably the same mindset that people did not find your game enjoyable or bother to try it. They either didn't like the type of game you made, didn't like the graphics, or thought it was too simple, not engaging, etc. And the same way you can very casually label off and give our games a low score is probably the same type of mindset other people had when playing your game as well. The same way you have no idea how much effort, design thought, and time we had to muster in order to make these small projects, the players don't know (or really care either) how much effort you put into making your game. All they see is the final product and they "are" comparing them to the "best" indie games out there. If you fall short in one category or another, then your game is not worth playing. It's a harsh world for indie game developers. No one care's about your idea, and unless you can make it look and feel like something fun, no one cares how original, or how hard it must have been to make it. 

 

It's hard, but there really must be a balance between, "I want to make my own idea my way" and "but will people like it if I do it that way?". Like I said, don't let yourself get down. Refine your game, OR in my opinion, just make a better one-


In Topic: Military Jet Copyrights

03 November 2013 - 10:46 PM

This is covered in the forum FAQ and in the little "Getting Started" box for the business forum. Clicky

Talk to your lawyer for a definitive answer. EA is in a financial position where they can choose to fight things out in the court. You probably are not.

My bad Frob. I did try to look for this thread in older sections of the forum, but I couldn't find one that was directly relatable to my topic. 

And thank you for the responses. It seems like I'd probably get away with what I'm doing, But I should really try my best to make up my own jets at this rate. Maybe combining two real ones into one made up one I guess. 

All the advice was really helpful guys, thank you!


In Topic: has anyone here released a game that got no attention and make you depressed...

03 November 2013 - 09:39 PM

I wouldn't say that you should be depressed about it. I worked on a game for about 7 months (It's a 9 month project). I made all the graphics for the characters and animations, and like 70% of the soundtrack. My two brothers programmed and made levels for it. We made a demo just to get a taste of how it would be received, and a lot of the responses in general were 50% neutral, 30% negative, and 20% positive. 

 

Now, as the developer of the game, am I depressed? I think my feeling was more like "Aw man, oh well let's see what I can learn from this". I learned that retro 3D graphics are no longer a good thing, people will judge a book by it's cover, and judge whether the game is good or not before they download it. You shouldn't expect players to have the patience to figure things out, you need to cleverly guise instructions in the form of a basic level. 

It was the first game to put our name out there. And as the first game, we are just happy it's almost done so that we can make something better right afterwards. You just gota keep going and making them better and better, and then if you finally make a good one, hopefully people will try the older games you made before you had a popular one. And then it will be appreciated then. That's how I see it. I'm not depressed, and I don't think you should. Rather, just be happy that you made a game and be proud of it. Make a better one and try to publicize it better. And for the love of god, don't make games for money- Make them because you want to let people experience an idea you thought would be fun. 

For anyone that cares, the game I am working on, and almost done with, it's name is "Spheroid" and you can find it in the "indie project" forum area of gamedev.net here:
http://www.gamedev.net/topic/649361-spheroid/
 

Keep at it man- It's really unrealistic to expect for the first game to be successful anyway. lol
 


In Topic: Feedback needed

01 November 2013 - 09:10 PM

Fair enough- lol 
I guess the rest just comes down to how it all comes together in the hands of the designer-


PARTNERS